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Pop music with meaning

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 20, 2008, 01:09:17 AM
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I think putting some sort of barrier between metal and "normal" popular music -- avant-rock and the like -- is a bit ridiculous. What makes Darkthrone so much more special than, say, Magma?


i honestly think it differs quite drastically (from other musics). maybe not structurally but in its intent and affect. there's really nothing to compare to ancient black metal the first time a person hears it, not even the great composers communicate that range of emotion/anti-emotionality to the modern listener. which is probably why true underground metal has such a dedicated following compared to other music sub-cultures.

while ANUS has expanded to include other music, and could continue to expand - all of this seems like a preparation (or setting of the scene) for the real issue - how metal will evolve.

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 20, 2008, 02:00:24 PM
Future Sound of London perhaps...

Late

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 21, 2008, 04:47:37 PM
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Future Sound of London perhaps...


"Dead Cities" is good stuff.

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 22, 2008, 01:35:35 AM
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I think putting some sort of barrier between metal and "normal" popular music -- avant-rock and the like -- is a bit ridiculous. What makes Darkthrone so much more special than, say, Magma?


I think it makes sense to describe what makes them different. I don't know much about Magma, but Darkthrone were in their best releases able to capture a sense of structure and change in emotion that is not matched in popular music.

There may be exceptions but, in all forms of design, you have to look at the intent. Pop music is there to make people feel content with what they have while showing them "the other side" that really isn't all that different.

Progressive rock has some exceptions, but compared to the Romanticist articulation of metal, it's primitive, even the best stuff, like Yes and Camel and King Crimson. Metal takes music a step further back toward reality, which has always been and always will be, and connects us to the similar eternity of transcendental thought.

We can also point out metal bands like Cannibal Corpse that don't fit this pattern, but then again, I'd call them pop music masquerading as metal.

Once we get past the bullshit that bad use of language thrusts upon us, we can see that like in literature, different forms of music are structured around different ideas and manifest those ideas in their form and content.

Upon that alone I say the difference is fundamental. How else can one tell in an instant that Opeth doesn't get it and "Under a Funeral Moon" does?

VorteIX

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 22, 2008, 01:54:26 AM
Metal is remembrance. Metal is affirmation of the present. Metal is forward perspective. Resuming, metal is energy in movement.

In common pop music, one can play any song knowing the melody, the chords, and the "genre" (rhythm) and you improvise as the song goes.

In metal this is impossible, as well as classical, one must understand and respect the arrangement as made by the composer, otherwise it gets meaningless. The context that surrounds our motivation is extremely important here, so, there's the need of a historical and philosophical understanding of the works.

But we found metal in form, but disposable in essence. Is there pop in form, but trascendental, or at least worthy, in essence?

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 22, 2008, 02:10:10 PM
What pop and jazz call "improvisation" however should be called "one-dimensional" improvisation, because it's not thematic improvisation, as improvisation is in classical. See here for more info.

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 22, 2008, 11:07:57 PM
Alice in Chains

VorteIX

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 23, 2008, 12:24:57 AM
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What pop and jazz call "improvisation" however should be called "one-dimensional" improvisation, because it's not thematic improvisation, as improvisation is in classical. See here for more info.


Classical improvisation focus in context, whereas jazz has it just as a mere pretext.

However, this pre-elaborated improvisation of classical, subtract the freedom of the musician in the moment . It's interesting to hear what some Jazz  musicians do at their level of spontaneity and I respect that, but unfortunately a lot often falls in licentiousness.

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 25, 2008, 10:35:29 AM
My Bloody Valentine is fine for pop.

Re: Pop music with meaning
March 28, 2008, 02:20:40 PM
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What pop and jazz call "improvisation" however should be called "one-dimensional" improvisation, because it's not thematic improvisation, as improvisation is in classical. See here for more info.

Patently false. Motivic organization is an important part of jazz improvisation. Quite simply, you haven't the ear to parse it, or atleast not yet.