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Horror films

Raise_the_Dead

Horror films
March 31, 2008, 05:33:40 PM
The horror genre has always intrigued me and watching these films as a child probably had a major effect on my eventual interest in metal.  They also had an obvious effect on the development of metal and probably deserve more discussion around here than they get.

Some of the greats:

the Exorcist
Suspiria
Rosemary's Baby
Last House on the Left
Night of the Living Dead
Dawn of the Dead
Hellraiser

There are many more.  Does anyone else enjoy this form of art (yes I said it), which is by now far more lost (in my mind) than metal is?

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Horror films
March 31, 2008, 06:44:45 PM
The original M is a masterpiece. Nosferatu and The Thing are brilliant, as well.

Re: Horror films
March 31, 2008, 06:53:23 PM
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The original M is a masterpiece.


I wouldn't consider that technically a horror film, but yes, it is brilliant nonetheless.

Re: Horror films
March 31, 2008, 07:49:06 PM
Most horror films, like most films in general, are rubbish, but I suppose that could be said of anything.

Night of the Living Dead and Psycho are the two that stand out most to me, particularly the former; its ending is one of the most nihilistic attacks against modernity to be committed to film -- and has quite the aesthetic appeal, given the abrasiveness of the background noise accompanying the bleak still shots. The zombies are a metaphor for the mindlessness of the modern individual, their countenances reminiscent of figures in Munch paintings.

Unfortunately, the audio doesn't synch up with the video in the following link, but it's the only one I could find for the ending:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXJrzCheiXw

Psycho has one of the more memorable scores. I've long searched for composers who approximate it in their works, and have found some satisfaction in Ligeti -- and, thanks to this forum, Alfred Schnittke -- but I often wonder if there's an entire compendium of 'horror'-style classical music from the 20th Century of which I am simply not cognizant.

As for M, I don't see anything overtly 'horror' in its style, but German Expressionism as a whole was notorious for its 'horror' leanings. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is an example, though I thought it relied too heavily on visuals to convey anything meaningful, and it strikes me as dated and silly.

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Horror films
March 31, 2008, 08:46:16 PM
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Psycho has one of the more memorable scores. I've long searched for composers who approximate it in their works, and have found some satisfaction in Ligeti -- and, thanks to this forum, Alfred Schnittke -- but I often wonder if there's an entire compendium of 'horror'-style classical music from the 20th Century of which I am simply not cognizant.


I'm glad you like Schnittke! Make sure you have the complete works for cello and piano, Boris Berman's recording of the piano works, and symphonies 1-5.

I recommend investigating Giacinto Scelsi. There are many composers that'd fit the "haunting, dark, horror-movie esque" bill, but he stands superior. I won't try to describe it with words. Get the Aion / Pfhat / Konx-Om-Pax disc.

(More names: Penderecki, Crumb, Gubaidulina, Berio... just branch out from there.)

Raise_the_Dead

Re: Horror films
March 31, 2008, 09:44:26 PM
It's worth noting that John Carpenter worked on the musical aspects for some of his films - I find it fucking awe-inspiring when artists have a real complete vision of what they want and find a way to stretch that vision across multiple forms of artistic media.

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The zombies are a metaphor for the mindlessness of the modern individual, their countenances reminiscent of figures in Munch paintings.


The sequel is like that too but 10x as obvious - it takes place in a mall!

Anyways, how do you guys find the time to listen to all of these composers I have never even heard of?

chrstphrbnntt

Re: Horror films
March 31, 2008, 11:37:38 PM
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Anyways, how do you guys find the time to listen to all of these composers I have never even heard of?


I'm a classical musician, so it comes with the territory.

It doesn't really take much effort to download semi-obscure modern classical off of blogs or SLSK, though.

Re: Horror films
April 01, 2008, 12:31:59 AM
the Evil Dead series is hilarious, yet still well put together.

so is Dead/Alive.

Re: Horror films
April 01, 2008, 02:44:29 AM
easy to say that as an adult ... but when you are a 6 yr old then its a different story  ???

Re: Horror films
April 01, 2008, 06:36:17 AM
Despite all its flaws and silliness Canibal Holocaust. It's some sort of protest film. Resembles grindcore (slightly moralistic and hippie) but is also nihilistic when it comes to show us the "healthy way", and how we are living in illusion. It has very obvious musical theme. Very simple and direct. Symbolism not lay in structure but in tone rather.

Re: Horror films
April 01, 2008, 01:33:42 PM
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is fuckin' great!  Dated, maybe, but not silly.  Essential for understanding the history of film and also for understanding Germany in that time period.  Really, it's the FIRST horror movie (I think it predates Nosferatu, but I might be wrong).  And "relying heavily on visuals" is the essence of filmmaking.  A great film needs nothing but visuals to tell a story.  I mean Dr. Caligari is a silent film to begin with, this forces the actors to physically tell the story with their expressions and their bodies - true acting!  By the way, the monster in the film is a Somnambulist.  There is famous quote of Hitler right at the time of the reoccupation of the Rhineland:  "I follow my Providence with the precision and assurance of a somnambulist!"  What an odd thing to say.

Re: Horror films
April 01, 2008, 02:51:00 PM
Dagon and Call of Cthulhu are both very good Lovecraft adaptions.

Re: Horror films
April 01, 2008, 05:41:44 PM
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Despite all its flaws and silliness Canibal Holocaust. It's some sort of protest film. Resembles grindcore (slightly moralistic and hippie) but is also nihilistic when it comes to show us the "healthy way", and how we are living in illusion. It has very obvious musical theme. Very simple and direct. Symbolism not lay in structure but in tone rather.



when i first saw this movie, i believe i witnessed the censored version on TV at around 2-3 am. i was only 10. needless to say it scared me witless.

i just saw it again recently, and i do have to admit it is rather silly. still, i enjoyed it highly.

Re: Horror films
April 01, 2008, 07:26:01 PM
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And "relying heavily on visuals" is the essence of filmmaking.  A great film needs nothing but visuals to tell a story.  I mean Dr. Caligari is a silent film to begin with, this forces the actors to physically tell the story with their expressions and their bodies - true acting!


Abstract Expressionism and Minimalism are both purely visual forms of art, but I'd much rather look at a Bouguereau painting. Behind the immediate aesthetic imagery, there needs to be actual content.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari seems to be limited to Harry Houdini-level magic tricks and histrionics; excusing this simply because it's a silent film is too forgiving. If you want stunning visual acting without any sound, The Passion of Joan of Arc trumps this film in every respect.

Oh, and I just checked out some of Scelsi's work -- exactly what I'm looking for. Thanks!

Re: Horror films
April 01, 2008, 09:05:12 PM
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If you want stunning visual acting without any sound, The Passion of Joan of Arc trumps this film in every respect.


I have yet to watch this, good reccomendation.