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Vikernes' release

Re: Vikernes' release
April 07, 2008, 09:50:22 PM
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Otto Dix, Franz Kafka, Erich Kleiber, Alban Berg, Albert Einstein, Jack London, and Thomas Mann are my favorites. Then there's all of the censored plays and movies, suppression of expressionism & surrealism... and the complete ban of jazz and anything bending the limits of tonality -- but I already know I'm in the minority there, so let's not get into it.


I don't think being in the minority has anything to do with it.

I don't understand the ban on Jack London, who seemed fairly fascist to me.

Thomas Mann had some positive attributes.

The rest? No loss.

I would have been even more extreme than Hitler. Bad art, or "theoretical" art with no resemblance to reality, makes every neurotic shithead think he's an artist.

Isn't that what happened to black metal?

Admit honestly: if you could have gone back in time, and censored all the me-too bands and trend postmodern idiots like Ulver, would you have?

I sure would have. I'm more like Plato than Hitler on censorship: hate the sin and destroy its work, but be gentle on the sinner.

euronymous

Re: Vikernes' release
April 08, 2008, 05:30:22 AM
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Varg sounds like he's afraid of stepping out of prison a celebrity, being followed around by the paparazzi and is taking precautionary measures so as to not ruin the rest of his free life.


I agree with this. He could even be afraid of stepping out of prison in any condition, afraid of just to be out. In that sense that retirement to farm life, although according with his sensibility, looks like a self quarantine.


Re: Vikernes' release
April 08, 2008, 11:31:40 AM
Kafka would have been a major loss.  What he did for the novel is immeasurable.

Nile577

Re: Vikernes' release
April 08, 2008, 05:04:38 PM
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Kafka would have been a major loss


I strongly agree, though we should not trivialise his thinking as a contribution to "The Novel."

It has been my experience that those who have become bitter towards the possibility of thoughtfulness will dismiss that which might lead to a turn in their own thinking. Here are we as the modern man is.

Here we rail against academic pedantry while ourselves diving into whichever "ism" (traditionalism, nihilism, satanism, nationalism, romanticism, activism, neoclassicism, classicism) fits our mood. We expect these ideas, for all their bluster, for all their importance, to be well grounded, to be thoughtful, and yet we find that they are not. We find instead that they are simply bad metaphysics. That they form a candy-stuffed grab bag of speculative "worldviews" and thinkers. That there are no essential differences between ideologies. Here are we as the modern man is.

Here we are concerned with the illness of modernity, with the illness of commodification, and yet we urge "JUST ACT! JUST DO IT!" seemingly unaware of the irony (Nike: Just Do It!).

To "fix" the world, to holocaust people, to pledge allegiance to causes and ideologies and movements is merely to propagate the thinking we oppose. How powerful, how pressing it sounds to accuse one of being "out of touch with reality," and yet, does it not make us tremble to see that this notion of "Reality (TM)," this baseless metaphysical principle, is the greatest barrier to thoughtfulness that we face. Nikeism is the death of thinking. Here are we as the modern man is.

I urge a return to the Earth, that we might nurture an authentic culture, that we might tend the coals of thinking. Culture is not "ideas" and "ideals" in themselves; it is the soil in which those things grow. Let us be gentle, subtle, caring and thoughtful in sowing new seeds.

Re: Vikernes' release
April 08, 2008, 06:21:54 PM
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I strongly agree, though we should not trivialise his thinking as a contribution to "The Novel."


Fair enough.  Point well taken.  And good post.

Re: Vikernes' release
April 08, 2008, 06:38:53 PM
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I strongly agree, though we should not trivialise his thinking as a contribution to "The Novel."

It has been my experience that those who have become bitter towards the possibility of thoughtfulness will dismiss that which might lead to a turn in their own thinking. Here are we as the modern man is.

Here we rail against academic pedantry while ourselves diving into whichever "ism" (traditionalism, nihilism, satanism, nationalism, romanticism, activism, neoclassicism, classicism) fits our mood. We expect these ideas, for all their bluster, for all their importance, to be well grounded, to be thoughtful, and yet we find that they are not. We find instead that they are simply bad metaphysics. That they form a candy-stuffed grab bag of speculative “worldviews” and thinkers. That there are no essential differences between ideologies. Here are we as the modern man is.

Here we are concerned with the illness of modernity, with the illness of commodification, and yet we urge “JUST ACT! JUST DO IT!,” seemingly unaware of the irony.

To “fix” the world, to holocaust people, to pledge allegiance to causes and ideologies and movements is merely to propagate the thinking we “oppose.” How powerful, how pressing it sounds to accuse one of being “out of touch with reality,” and yet, does it not make us tremble to see that this notion of “Reality (TM),” this baseless metaphysical principle, is the greatest barrier to thoughtfulness that we face. Nikeism is the death of thinking. Here are we as the modern man is.

I urge a return to the Earth, that we might nurture an authentic culture, that we might tend the coals of thinking. Culture is not “ideas” and “ideals” in themselves; it is the soil in which those things grow. Let us be gentle, subtle, caring and thoughtful in sowing new seeds.


Overworded and underthought, as per usual.

Re: Vikernes' release
April 08, 2008, 08:18:05 PM
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It has been my experience that those who have become bitter towards the possibility of thoughtfulness will dismiss that which might lead to a turn in their own thinking.


Oh, a thoughtfully disguised ad hom.

I deal in reality. Back in reality, talking about getting back to the soil without any organization is a substitute for simply doing what is right.

At the end of the day, all real solutions are as brilliant as the universe: simple and self-evident, when we've removed the blinders from our eyes.

Kafka took the novel form back several hundred years by returning it to pedantic propaganda of a single level of obvious symbolism. Like the postmodernists to follow, he ignored character in favor of "situation + standard human responses = equality of outlook but not experience." That has nothing to do with life.

At some point, you're either motivated by fear, or motivated by a lack of fear. I choose the latter, but even if I hadn't, it would be irrelevant. I want rising culture that is grounded in ultimate reality, not word games to aggrandize ourselves.

I find it interesting that almost all of the critics here make the same argument: you people (notice how we become faceless masses to suit their convenience) are all exactly what you didn't want to become, which suspiciously resembles what the speakers fears but not what is feared here. All of these assaults attempt to prove hypocrisy, because they have no other offense against something self-evident. They want to believe. They want to show that we are secretly underconfident elitists. So they take an underconfident elitist hipster approach: we just didn't think of the brilliant things they say. Of course.

Nile577, while he makes many interesting conversations, is also like too many caught up in the dream. Let go of yourself.

Re: Vikernes' release
April 09, 2008, 03:23:46 PM
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Kafka took the novel form back several hundred years by returning it to pedantic propaganda of a single level of obvious symbolism. Like the postmodernists to follow, he ignored character in favor of "situation + standard human responses = equality of outlook but not experience." That has nothing to do with life.


The novel has its own history completely separate from philosophy and politics.  Kafka reaquainted the novel with fantasy.  What you call ignoring character I call a calculated decision to leave out the unessential.  Kafka created a new way for novelists to get from point A to point B without getting bogged down in endless details - if you don't believe me read Balzac or Hugo or Joyce - tell me who is the better storyteller, Kafka or them?  Kafka made the novel more "mythical," I mean the Odyssey is pretty light on "character," too, no?  Isn't the Odyssey just situation + standard human response?  In fact Kafka DID take the novel back a couple hundred years - TO THE BENEFIT OF THE NOVEL.  Don't get me wrong, Kafka never wrote anything as important as Don Quixote, but Kafka gave future novelists more "tools"/approaches to work with.

And what do you mean by "propaganda?"  He died in 1924 and ANTICIPATED the totalitarian regimes of Germany and Communist Russia.  I mean if his writings were RESPONSES to totalitarian regimes I could see what you're saying.  But frankly I think it's pretty impressive that what he was writing about essentially came true 10 years after he died!

What novelists do you read, Onan?

"Art isn't there to be some great mirror registering all of History's ups and downs, variations, endless repetitions...It is there to create its own history." -Milan Kundera

Re: Vikernes' release
April 09, 2008, 06:59:18 PM
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The novel has its own history completely separate from philosophy and politics.  Kafka reaquainted the novel with fantasy.  


Not a form of fantasy that has meaning outside the political. All of history is one entity, and novels tell its story. Trying to glorify some guy who made paper-cutout symbolism trendy is like pissing in the wind.

Re: Vikernes' release
April 09, 2008, 07:43:19 PM
You clearly don't want to get too deep into this conversation as you ignored everything else I had to say.  I, frankly, wouldn't even give him the credit of saying that his form of fantasy had political meaning.  I don't think his form of fantasy has any meaning whatsoever - it's merely technique.  But it's a technique that give the novel and the author their own autonomy - that is the importance of reacquatinting the novel with fantasy.  History may be one entity but the novel does NOT tell its story.  All great art strives to resist gravity.  Any novel or piece of art that merely accepts its role as being History's trumpet boy has succumbed to gravity.  Perhaps you should stick to "non"-fiction, Onan, that way you can avoid pesky things like "symbols."

Re: Vikernes' release
April 09, 2008, 10:30:40 PM
My predictions and hopes.

I hope he releases something musical.
I hope it doesnt suck like Dissection's last album because so much years passed between.
I hope it will blow out everything ever made.
(...)
I predict he will suicide anyway  :'(

Re: Vikernes' release
April 09, 2008, 11:47:58 PM
fatalism doesn't seem like a part of his personality. if he's not as vibrant and energetic as before maybe that's because he's learned a better way to accomplish his goals throughout the experience. conviction to his beliefs hasn't deteriorated - the core of his beliefs haven't changed.

Re: Vikernes' release
April 10, 2008, 07:31:46 AM
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If I grow too old and weak, or too sick, I will probably find an old ash tree and simply hang myself, like Odinn and the Pagan initiates did, only I don't intend to return to life (not until I am reborn anyhow). The suicide is the ultimate victory over the body, because the body's natural instincts will force you to try and survive, no matter what, while the spirit and hugr (mind, "soul") always seek to return to the gods. The suicide is also very attractive because it allows me to demonstrate the will to remove the effete, and to give room for the young and healthy, even if the effete is me - and naturally at one point I will become effete too, like we all will.

From the official Burzum site.
Quit making me quote interviews.

Re: Vikernes' release
April 10, 2008, 12:21:10 PM
There's a difference between fatalistic suicide and the suicide espoused above. The second is the ultimate existential declaration, and is doubtless nobler than wasting away in a hospital bed. I'm sure he'd prefer to die in battle, or something, but is realistic enough to acknowledge the unlikeliness of this scenario.

Nile577

Re: Vikernes' release
May 16, 2008, 12:40:32 AM
Kafka’s “symbolism” is amongst the most complex and esoteric in literature, being replete with Kabbalistic mythology. In this regard he is a seer, like Blake, or Eliot, but unlike Eliot his “symbols” are disclosive rather than didactic.

Kafka broadens our understanding of what it is to be human through his masterful exposition of the gesture. A gesture is not an aesthetic symbol but a stand upon what human being constitutively is – for Kafka, in modernity, homeless, cultureless, and desperately trying to cover-up angst. If we wanted to see “pedantic propaganda of a single level of obvious (Kabbalistic) symbolism,” we might look at the Averse Sefira discography.

Fascist literature is all diagnosis and cruelty; all bad metaphysics and Reality™.  It is not thoughtful. It does not approach the task of thinking. It is not holy. I have not read Houellebecq’s poetry but I do not hold much hope for it.

Much black metal is essentially surrealist in that it “mines the past” for nuggets of “culture” to dis-tort in a wall of guitar.  Moron revivalist bands like Bathory and Enslaved dress up in Viking trappings in an attempt to establish a dialectic between past and present cultures, whereby a romanticised past “culture” is aggressively juxtaposed against modernity. However, it isn’t, because, as the ANUS review observes, what results is “grotesque carnival music.” Culture is not top-down ideology but the soil from which thinking springs.

When artistic, surrealism, in its destabilising of metaphysical Reality(Tm) is suggestive of the holy; the sacred truth of being. It is only when metaphysics and Philosophy are destroyed that we grasp human being as being-in-the-world, that the common-place can become wondrous and strange. If we are to be symbolic: the Earth is not a factory but a cathedral; our comportment within it should be one of awe.