Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Black Metal Art

Black Metal Art
June 30, 2005, 09:04:19 PM
BANKS VIOLETTE: UNTITLED
Whitney Museum of American Art
May 27-October 2, 2005

The Whitney has commissioned Banks Violette, whose work was featured in the 2004 Biennial, to create a new project for his first single-artist museum exhibition. The work, a multi-media sculptural installation with a sound component, re-imagines the romantic sublime via narratives drawn from popular culture. The sound component is a piece of music written by Snorre Ruch, part of an insular music subculture called Black Metal, whose ethos embraced nihilism, theatrical morbidity, aggression and violence. The central sculptural component evokes a minimalist representation of the ruined skeleton of a church, a reference to the romantic iconography of such painters as Caspar David Friedrich and to an image drawn from a Black Metal album cover. Cast in salt, the ghost-like church skeleton, a familiar image of romantic decay, is reinvested with meaning both through the formal seduction of the piece and the viewer’s interaction with it in the space.



http://www.artnews.info/news.php?i=3582&t=news

TC

Re: Black Metal Art
July 01, 2005, 11:31:02 AM
there was actually a better article on it three weeks or so ago here.

euronymous

Re: Black Metal Art
July 03, 2005, 06:25:06 AM
Quote
BANKS VIOLETTE: UNTITLED
Whitney Museum of American Art
May 27-October 2, 2005

The Whitney has commissioned Banks Violette, whose work was featured in the 2004 Biennial, to create a new project for his first single-artist museum exhibition. The work, a multi-media sculptural installation with a sound component, re-imagines the romantic sublime via narratives drawn from popular culture. The sound component is a piece of music written by Snorre Ruch, part of an insular music subculture called Black Metal, whose ethos embraced nihilism, theatrical morbidity, aggression and violence. The central sculptural component evokes a minimalist representation of the ruined skeleton of a church, a reference to the romantic iconography of such painters as Caspar David Friedrich and to an image drawn from a Black Metal album cover. Cast in salt, the ghost-like church skeleton, a familiar image of romantic decay, is reinvested with meaning both through the formal seduction of the piece and the viewer’s interaction with it in the space.



http://www.artnews.info/news.php?i=3582&t=news




The original skeleton was already an art masterpiece.


Why "insular"?