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Good deeds

Good deeds
October 31, 2008, 05:35:00 PM
Yesterday, I helped an old lady lift her suitcase up and down a flight of stairs. I hadn't had this opportunity before. Despite being a cliché, and really being no bother at all, I felt a tangible sense of glee at being able to help to a worthy cause. A real worthy cause, mind you; not like a damaging placation of guilt such as donating to third world charity con. I then went to work afterwards with what felt like a rainbow behind my eyes. Work is normally a bothersome trudge to get through, but I found myself, unawares, happily talking away to my imperfect work neighbours and customers on the telephone, interactions which would normally quietly frustrate me. It was a real shift of interpretation, and today I have been practising the piano with renewed vigour.

I guess the point of this ASBO-inspired thread is to say that metal can often paint a worthless, fatalist picture of humanity and our actions within it. But actually the ability to help the good, and not just criticise the bad, has an immediate and personal sense of uplifting, if you let it. A nihilist shouldn't lose all sense of right and wrong, he just interprets it better and adjusts his actions accordingly.

Re: Good deeds
October 31, 2008, 08:19:50 PM
I have a very similar feeling when a man I helped in a wheel chair hit a pot hole and fell off and was unable to get back on. Worst of all was that it was bucketing down and because he was behind parked cars no one could see him.

Re: Good deeds
November 02, 2008, 01:42:57 AM
what was your point More Celt Then Sassenach?

just to talk about how you helped someone, somehow boosting your ego? quite a pointless and self-indulged post.

Re: Good deeds
November 02, 2008, 02:43:05 AM
what was your point More Celt Then Sassenach?

just to talk about how you helped someone, somehow boosting your ego? quite a pointless and self-indulged post.

And what was your point with the attack on motivations when the post obviously had something to do with the thread topic?
"Love thy neighbour" is a fucking joke, for few are worthy of my love.

Re: Good deeds
November 02, 2008, 05:05:06 AM
what was your point More Celt Then Sassenach?

just to talk about how you helped someone, somehow boosting your ego? quite a pointless and self-indulged post.
sounds to me like he was relating to the original post's author by telling him about a similar experience of his own. this is a normal behavior for a group of people who share common values, as it reinforces the bonds by which those values are held. which, unlike unwarranted speculations on intention, makes it the absolute opposite of egotism
HE WHO REAPS STORMS, SOWS WINDS. HE WHO SOWS WINDS, REAPS STORMS.

"It is better to go to a house of mourning than to go to a house of feasting, for death is the destiny of every man; the living should take this to heart."
-Ecclesiastes 7:2

Re: Good deeds
November 02, 2008, 08:32:52 AM
I have a natural urge to aid the elderly. Sure, some of them are probably living out long, overdrawn pointless lives, thanks to common pity for them, and the false belief that a long life is a good one.

However, the few that I have had the experience of actually talking to and hearing whatever they have to say, they impart an awful lot of life experience and wisdom, and it stays with you. Particularly the few World War veterans that are still alive. For this, it's often just worth it to do the least and aid them whenever it's suitable. It's common knowledge that the elderly are wise, but a lot of us probably take this for granted, and don't give a shit.

It's often said that they don't respect the youth and our recent generations, and rightly so; they've embraced modernity, and the ones that made it out alive and have a level head still will basically tell you that it's a bunch of bullshit, in one way or another. Nobody heeds their 'warnings', and they die alone in a nursing home, comforted occasionally by volunteers or whomever, out of pity, and without any actual sincerity or respect.

Pity sucks.

Re: Good deeds
November 02, 2008, 11:42:23 AM
Being a nihilist or whatever doesn't mean you can't or ever shouldn't practice random acts of kindness.

http://meaningoflife.tv/video.php?speaker=wilson&topic=goodwogod

I get the feeling when I do something like CB or MCTS did, or the giving directions like the example in the video.  However I'll admit though that I don't get this feeling when I am practicing compulsory community service, mostly because it just ends up being a pity party and you don't actually end up helping anyone!  Perhaps this is my own particular personal experience....
Formerly known as "Metalist"

Re: Good deeds
November 02, 2008, 04:46:54 PM
I typically do "good deeds" if I feel I would do someone's task more efficiently. An old man opening a door, who has a cane -- I would rather open the door myself, for example.
I typically open/hold doors open for the general public. I know I dislike having doors close on my face, and it requires extra effort to stop the door, and reverse it's direction. It's a normal part of my life. I typically help out when someone is in need. I really don't feel much satisfaction helping them though; it's more of a feeling that I'm contributing to holistic well-being.

In essence, the thing that hurts me the most is seeing struggle or suffering. I understand helping out the elderly. It is doubtful in my mind that they are parasitic enough to get to that stage in life.

I have no remorse for people born "handicapped". Every time I see them, I just wish I could end them so they wouldn't have to suffer. I try to avoid these people best I can. Some liberal dipshits may say, "it's not their fault they're the way they are". My point of view is: they're living, they're suffering, they're parasites, so fuck 'em. Same with those starving children of Africa. I don't give a shit about them.

Re: Good deeds
November 03, 2008, 01:38:50 AM
The bigger point is that abortion needs to stay legal.  The liberals got one thing right.
I live in my own place
Have never copied nobody even half
And at any Master who lacks the grace
To laugh at himself, I laugh!

Re: Good deeds
November 03, 2008, 01:55:03 AM
In a utopian society I'd envisage people being as independent as possible and if nature should smite them down then I would not complain. I'll admit that no one can master every skill, hence we all need help at some point in our life; however, I believe some people are more deserving of help than others. I don't want to sound like a Christian idealist by stating that: people should be helped if they help themself first. Perhaps the Christians got that one right? What they got wrong is the over emphasis of pity and praising the weak.

However, the few that I have had the experience of actually talking to and hearing whatever they have to say, they impart an awful lot of life experience and wisdom, and it stays with you. Particularly the few World War veterans that are still alive. For this, it's often just worth it to do the least and aid them whenever it's suitable. It's common knowledge that the elderly are wise, but a lot of us probably take this for granted, and don't give a shit.

Common knowledge is not so common, anything that truly is common knowledge then it is almost certainly unprofound: breathing is necessary to live. I cringe at the use of the platitude "wisedom comes with age", I've found that to be untrue. My evidence is anecdotal at best but I'd guess that is true for most. What I'll grant you is that the very eldery tend to have very different opinions and principles than the youth of today, they are a product of their of generation's society as today's youth are a product this society. While they might have better principles, I'd be willing to admit that, they are not necessarily 'wise' because they have good principles. I think it makes more sense to associate wisedom with the ability to think critically, if Nietzsche could do that at 25 then I think that destroys the notion of wisedom coming with age.

Quote from: My AIDS, Your Arse
It's often said that they don't respect the youth and our recent generations, and rightly so; they've embraced modernity, and the ones that made it out alive and have a level head still will basically tell you that it's a bunch of bullshit, in one way or another. Nobody heeds their 'warnings', and they die alone in a nursing home, comforted occasionally by volunteers or whomever, out of pity, and without any actual sincerity or respect.

This is too ad hominem to be a good argument; I agree that the "youth" of today (most people <60 years old) have fallen into the liberal democratic status quo but we should find better arguments than emotion and morality for highlighting their flaws. Otherwise we have succumbed to their methods of debate.

Re: Good deeds
November 04, 2008, 09:59:33 PM
By helping people in this way we exert our power over them; that's where the buzz comes from. Nietzsche, kids. But the buzz is no less real or pleasurable from being understood.

Re: Good deeds
November 04, 2008, 11:32:14 PM
Don't do it for the buzz.

Align your thinking to reality: do it because it's the right thing to do, for the maintenance of a harmonious and positive/creative order for man and nature alike.

This is also more realistic, because this way you will not spend your time rescuing AIDS patients, but might devote more to productive people fallen on hard times (widows, etc).

ASBO

“Kurt Cobain was, ladies and gentlemen, a worthless shred of human debris.” - Rush Limbaugh

Re: Good deeds
November 05, 2008, 04:45:44 PM
That was my point, ASBO. I was worried some may take this thread wrongly; I wasn't endorsing a pity-hedonism 'buzz', I was saying in the right situations and with the right perceptions, the reaction still exists and is enhanced by recognising its legitimacy.

Re: Good deeds
November 05, 2008, 10:32:49 PM
How do you justify helping even war veterans without resorting to Christian (or other but similar) morality, unless you are doing it for the power buzz? Why should they be helped? What is the desired end result of this activity, and why - from your point of view - is it desirable?
We cannot claim to be 'nihilists' and then swallow one of the precepts of modern Christian morality - that it is worthy to help the helpless - wholesale.

Re: Good deeds
November 06, 2008, 12:03:18 AM
one could easily make the argument that veterans, by being former warriors, should be honored. not because they are weak and helpless now, but because they offered themselves to the greater values of their culture. a better way to ask the same question would be to use non-veteran cripples or drug addicts
HE WHO REAPS STORMS, SOWS WINDS. HE WHO SOWS WINDS, REAPS STORMS.

"It is better to go to a house of mourning than to go to a house of feasting, for death is the destiny of every man; the living should take this to heart."
-Ecclesiastes 7:2