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The role of bass guitar in Metal.

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
December 18, 2008, 07:06:27 PM
Quote
ve heard that album many times and Ive got to honestly say that Ive never heard that kind of bass playing in there. Not to mention that the bass is heavily buried in the mix.

Only on the remaster: it's pretty up front in the original mix.

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
December 18, 2008, 07:07:53 PM
Quote
  Ive heard that album many times and Ive got to honestly say that Ive never heard that kind of bass playing in there. Not to mention that the bass is heavily buried in the mix. It seems to me that european death metal is more "bass-free" when compared to american death metal.

It's the difference in musical cultures: the impact of jazz on American music can't be overstated.

Cigno

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
December 20, 2008, 05:21:34 AM


Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
December 22, 2008, 09:52:19 PM
I've listened to Necromantia and apparently they only use an 8 stringed bass or whatever, and they stink.

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
December 23, 2008, 03:53:14 PM
Agreed that later in death and especially black metal bass guitar tends to be sort of forgotten and just keeping up with everyone else. Atheist and Sadus created some beautiful works in the spirit of jazz fusion bass and Barathrum (early), Necromantia (early) and Ride For Revenge have used bass as the main melodic instrument.

'Midgard's Eldar' by Enslaved is a unique Black Metal example in how it assigns the rhythm guitars to provide the ambient backdrop to the bass guitar playing the lead melody, a configuration reversed as the song concludes to great effect.

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
January 25, 2009, 09:14:09 AM
Base does tend to be used to simply enhance the music, and that is a very important role - although simplistic, yet very-very important. I've read some quotes here where it mentions about baroque music, where mainly two lines (one base and one alto or tenor), work independently to create a melody. It is possible and there are many bands that I've heard doing so, however, they do it only in some parts of the music.

I studied music own my own for a few years and played guitar for many years. I am no master by no means, but my thoughts are that base is difficult to hear even when it is doing a lot of work, perhaps because of the over empowering sounds of all the other instruments playing at the same time with higher notes. I do agree that there is a lot more that composers can do to give the base more justice. I've created a few compositions and one of my rules is to mix the base: Keep with the root for some time, and in other parts where required to enhance the music, have it do something else to create a variation, but I don't like to make the base different all the time. I guess I could compare it with a guitar...Everybody likes to hear a solo, but if you do it throught out the whole song, in all of your songs, it might not sound that great.  A good mixture is my preference.
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Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
January 25, 2009, 09:19:55 AM
Base does tend to be used to simply enhance the music, and that is a very important role - although simplistic, yet very-very important. I've read some quotes here where it mentions about baroque music, where mainly two lines (one base and one alto or tenor), work independently to create a melody. It is possible and there are many bands that I've heard doing so, however, they do it only in some parts of the music.

I studied music own my own for a few years and played guitar for many years. I am no master by no means, but my thoughts are that base is difficult to hear even when it is doing a lot of work, perhaps because of the over empowering sounds of all the other instruments playing at the same time with higher notes. I do agree that there is a lot more that composers can do to give the base more justice. I've created a few compositions and one of my rules is to mix the base: Keep with the root for some time, and in other parts where required to enhance the music, have it do something else to create a variation, but I don't like to make the base different all the time. I guess I could compare it with a guitar...Everybody likes to hear a solo, but if you do it throught out the whole song, in all of your songs, it might not sound that great.  A good mixture is my preference.
Loud Trends [www.loudtrends.com]
Apparel and Accessories Store
Styles from Alternative Rock to the Darkest Metal

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
February 03, 2009, 12:38:05 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uL11qPAqasI

I always ask myself why there is no review or any quotation of this band on ANUS. I'ts one of the best black metal bands with great music composition i have ever heard...

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
February 03, 2009, 01:51:11 AM
i play bass in a metal band as well and i've never had anyone give me anything about it being the least talented instrument or anything you mentioned. it takes a good amount of skill to master any instrument. it depends on the musician not the instrument

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
February 10, 2009, 07:19:07 PM
I'm surprised the brilliant bass lines in Atheist's Unquestionable Presence album have been overlooked, while also (though not to my taste) Cynic's Focus and demos.

Jay

Re: The role of bass guitar in Metal.
February 11, 2009, 12:43:22 PM
How about presenting the evolution of bass guitar in metal music on the basis of its sound, aiming at presenting the most extreme examples in history?

Starting with the chugging, brutal sound of Geezer, through dirtier and coarser attempts by Cronos, the abhorrent sound of Repulsion's bassist, and finishing on the more experimental sound of Sunn O)))