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Class conflict in metal

Re: Class conflict in metal
January 16, 2009, 05:05:38 AM
The correlation between classes and metal is very shakey, because most metal is not political music. Blak metal and a lot of death metal is Scandinivian which is a veryrich part of the world and has created some of the most intellignetly written music, but there are many examples of working class based bands that don't fit thesteriotype of stupid beer drinking headbangers.

I think a great deal is both relative and subjective to both the persons involved and the manner in which they take hold of the subculture, regardless of class/social status.  Although there can be variation and exceptions, maybe even overlaps.

Not every working class/urbanite metalist or Hessian is a dumb "partygoer" with the homo-erotic hedonism entailed with the stereotype.  Just the same, not every middle class or upper-middle class metalhead is inherently a "poser" or "hanger on" nor is every one of them innately capable of producing quality metal music.
The mind is a product of the brain; the soul is a product of the choices that brain makes. Nothing is equal; in physics, they refer to a state of equality as "entropy."

Re: Class conflict in metal
January 16, 2009, 08:47:35 AM

Within metal, some music appeals to one group over others, and the creators vary widely. At the Gates came from an upper middle class background, as did Sepultura.

Sepultura were poor, they had to build their own bullet-belts for the Morbid Visions photoshoot out of used batteries.

Re: Class conflict in metal
January 24, 2009, 03:53:06 AM
Early DM was a direct outgrowth of Speed and Thrash Metal, and was both created and enjoyed by essentially the same people. Back in the 80's and early 90's virtually all the people I personally knew in the burgeoning DM world(primarily in the NYDM movement - in and out of NY)hailed from at best working class to lower middle-class backgrounds. No one in that scene had a "rich mommy and daddy" that I can recall - and if they did it made no difference because that rich mommy and daddy had long since kicked them out of the house by then!!

I spoke to Mike Smith once after a Suffocation show, and he told me that his family lived in the suburbs of New York and none of the other members were in the inner city, contrary to the "street-level" interpretation I've read on this site. He said the band used to practice at his house in his basement because his parents didn't mind the noise. From talking with him I just got the impression that the band was more middle class than anything. I also once spoke with Sam Inzerra, drummer of Morpheus Descends, who said he was 16 when Ritual of Infinity was recorded. Normally I'd think having parents rich enough to buy you a drumset suitable for a Death Metal band would mean they're at least somewhat well-off financially, but that's just my assumption. Records, equipment, leather jackets, patches, postage - all these have to be paid for somehow, and to me it seems pretty hefty considering the extent of their consumption by a metal freak. I know some people like Fenriz dropped out of school in order to work full-time to pay for their bands' equipment.

What, now we're Christians who must suffer and be martyrs before we're allowed to note that the world is fucked up?  Personally, I think it reflects rather well on the intelligence and principles of the early Norse scene that it's primary figures rose up against a world they knew was heading for failure, despite the privileged positions they could have occupied merely by accepting the status quo. 

Hardship builds character. I'd take the opinion of someone who's had to work hard to get somewhere over some brat who was coasted through life. The word "spoiled" in this context should apply in the literal sense, as it does to fruit: just rotten people. You want a fucked up society? Try Bosnia, Africa or Afghanistan, not the most affluent and secular parts of Europe. Personally, I think it reflects rather well on the intelligence and principles of the early Norse scene that Fantoft is still standing and these key figures eliminated themselves either through murder, imprisonment or just leaving the scene to the homosexual pedophiles and corpsepaint mannequins who run it today, but you're welcome to subscribe to whatever opinion you want, at least in this society.

Re: Class conflict in metal
January 24, 2009, 04:52:04 AM
Early DM was a direct outgrowth of Speed and Thrash Metal, and was both created and enjoyed by essentially the same people. Back in the 80's and early 90's virtually all the people I personally knew in the burgeoning DM world(primarily in the NYDM movement - in and out of NY)hailed from at best working class to lower middle-class backgrounds. No one in that scene had a "rich mommy and daddy" that I can recall - and if they did it made no difference because that rich mommy and daddy had long since kicked them out of the house by then!!

I spoke to Mike Smith once after a Suffocation show, and he told me that his family lived in the suburbs of New York and none of the other members were in the inner city, contrary to the "street-level" interpretation I've read on this site. He said the band used to practice at his house in his basement because his parents didn't mind the noise. From talking with him I just got the impression that the band was more middle class than anything. I also once spoke with Sam Inzerra, drummer of Morpheus Descends, who said he was 16 when Ritual of Infinity was recorded. Normally I'd think having parents rich enough to buy you a drumset suitable for a Death Metal band would mean they're at least somewhat well-off financially, but that's just my assumption. Records, equipment, leather jackets, patches, postage - all these have to be paid for somehow, and to me it seems pretty hefty considering the extent of their consumption by a metal freak. I know some people like Fenriz dropped out of school in order to work full-time to pay for their bands' equipment.

I'm not interested in relating my whole life here, nor do I believe anyone else would care anyway. However, as someone who, as it happens, also grew up in suburban New York, was fully connected to the Metal scene there, personally know(and have known for over twenty years) one individual you specifically noted in your post, I can only say that I speak from first hand experience. That some may have different stories to tell is altogether possible.

Most of us bought our own leather jackets, drumkits, guitars, etc., and had little if any help from 'ol mom and dad by the way. A motivated teenager can do wonderful things, even with a part-time, manual labor job's income. It's just the way it was.               

Re: Class conflict in metal
January 24, 2009, 04:57:47 AM
The big human fiction is that people get money at random.

If your parents are middle class, they worked for it, and most commonly, they're not going to buy you a whole bunch of stuff. They want you to know the value of labor.

The exceptions are parents who are new to wealth. They spoil their kids because they don't know how to manage wealth.
ASBO

“Kurt Cobain was, ladies and gentlemen, a worthless shred of human debris.” - Rush Limbaugh

Re: Class conflict in metal
January 26, 2009, 03:35:31 PM
Coming from a financially upper middle class background, having had a Classical education, and holding significant estates in Devon - ergo, being, for all intrinsic purposes, upper class - I have never, until recently, been under the impression that Metal, of any kind, is associated with the lower classes.  It had never crossed my mind that metal had been a part of that whole class divide nonsense, indeed.  I knew, of course, that early metal bands (Black Sabbath spring to mind instantly) came from lower class backgrounds.  However, the bands of the early Norwegian Black Metal scene were, as far as I know, middle to upper middle class.  Look at Akercocke - an obvious sign that Metal is not simply music for the "brutes" of society, as friends of mine have so politely put it.

Conversely to my own class background, a cousin of mine has most notably taken the appearence and affectations of a member of the lower/lower middle classes.  He, too, listens to Metal predominantly.  I find it interesting, however, that he is more inclined to listen to the heavier, more aggressive, and more popular styles of metal.  Bands like Hatebreed, early Slipknot, Korn, etc, feature on his list of favourites.  He was, at one time, an avid fan of Children of Bodom, but, unfortunately, that foray into European Metal ended rather abruptly after the release of "Are You Dead Yet".

It is my belief that Metal, being so diverse a musical genre, can engender interest in any individual, regardless of class.  However, when it comes to subgenres, there can be clear class distinction.  I tend to find that the more eloquent and better educated fans that I talk to tend to listen to the more technical/musically interesting bands - Decapitated, Emperor, Dream Theatre, etc.  Black, Death, Progressive, Power Metal.  Those with lesser intelligence (or, perhaps, those who simply choose to have an inability to type proper English or use correct grammar, syntax, vocabulary, brain power, etc) tend towards what I would dub the reflections of popular music - bands like Slipknot, Atreyu, Avenged Sevenfold, who are most certainly "mainstream", and far closer, musically, to "traditional popular music", if such a thing exists.