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Conditions for Art

Conditions for Art
January 02, 2009, 03:02:20 PM
234

"Value of the middle of the path. Perhaps the engendering of ge­nius is reserved to only a limited period of humanity. For one cannot expect the future of humanity to hold at the same time everything that only very particular conditions in some past time could produce-the amazing effects of religious feeling, for exam­ple. This has had its time, and many very good things can never grow again because they could grow from it alone. Thus there will never again be a religiously defined horizon to life and cul­ture. Perhaps even the type of the saint is possible only along with a certain intellectual narrowness, which is apparently gone for­ever. And so, perhaps, has the highest level of intelligence been reserved for one single era of humanity; it came forth (and is com­ing forth, for we still live in this era) when, by way of exception, an extraordinary, long-accumulated energy of the will was diver­ted through inheritance to intellectual goals. This highest level will end when such wildness and energy are no longer cultivated. Perhaps mankind, in the middle of its path, the middle period of its existence, is nearer to its actual goal than it will be at the end. The energies that condition art, for example, could very well die out; pleasure in lying, in vagueness, in symbolism, in intoxica­tion, in ecstasy, could come into disrepute. Indeed, once life is structured in a perfect state, then the present will no longer offer any theme for poetry whatsoever, and only backward people would still demand poetic unreality. They would then look back longingly to the times of the imperfect state, the half-barbaric so­ciety, to our times."

Friedrich Nietzsch, Human All to Human

Was reading this the otehr day and it occurred to me that perhaps this more than anything explains the rise and fall of metal. Art never exists in a vacuum and it is not simply down to the people involved why such an art failed.




Re: Conditions for Art
January 05, 2009, 11:19:33 AM
Indeed, once life is structured in a perfect state, then the present will no longer offer any theme for poetry whatsoever, and only backward people would still demand poetic unreality. They would then look back longingly to the times of the imperfect state, the half-barbaric so­ciety, to our times.

Nietzsche said in other writings that only a diseased time needs philosophers. However, he has praised the value of art as eternal. The problem inherent to this is that art in a perfect time would be limited to expressing what the society already knew; kind of like saying "happy cat is happy," it would be tautological. Then again, the idea of perfection has no grounds in reality and artists will always find something fantastic or interesting to create, so I'm sceptical of his conclusions here. As an addendum, however, I've found that smart people are content to read art like reference books, and appreciate its beauty but learn from it, while idiots need a steady flow of "new art" of shallow depth in order to feel hip and cool an shit.

Re: Conditions for Art
January 05, 2009, 02:13:12 PM
Then again, the idea of perfection has no grounds in reality and artists will always find something fantastic or interesting to create, so I'm sceptical of his conclusions here.

I seriously doubt that human beings, that are by nature pieces of the greater framework of the universe, with our naturally limited perception (we are not reality, we experience it from one viewpoint) will ever run short of things to marvel at.  Agreed in full.

Re: Conditions for Art
January 07, 2009, 09:40:20 PM
...as long as human beings learn to love (not the liberal definition) before they become embittered and filled with resentment...

Re: Conditions for Art
March 16, 2009, 11:13:18 PM
Was reading this the otehr day and it occurred to me that perhaps this more than anything explains the rise and fall of metal. Art never exists in a vacuum and it is not simply down to the people involved why such an art failed.
How has it been a failure? We're here, aren't we? Contemplating, planning, living. Nothing is static. Energy is neither created nor destroyed; it merely changes forms. And life is opposed to entropy.

Re: Conditions for Art
March 28, 2009, 07:17:01 PM
Was reading this the otehr day and it occurred to me that perhaps this more than anything explains the rise and fall of metal. Art never exists in a vacuum and it is not simply down to the people involved why such an art failed.
How has it been a failure? We're here, aren't we? Contemplating, planning, living. Nothing is static. Energy is neither created nor destroyed; it merely changes forms. And life is opposed to entropy.

Dude, metal now is a total failure. It's soulless crap for idiots. This means somewhere on the way to this point, the genre failed.

I don't think what we have now is appreciably more shitty than Def Leppard, Quiet Riot and all the glam noise from the mid-1980s like Poison, Cinderella, Bon Jovi, Bang Tango, and so forth. I think those bands were working from a rock framework and made better music, however, because they were less neurotic.

Metal now has no goal. There are a few exceptions, but far fewer than anyone here thinks, since I know how trendy it is to insist "there's good metal out there!!!" and then list fifteen obscure bands that upon listening are discovered to be the same old shit with minor variations.