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Dialectical materialism in metal

Dialectical materialism in metal
January 31, 2009, 03:14:57 PM
Marx and Hegel made a big deal of dialectical materialism: something happens, then its opposite, then compromise and that makes the next level of history.

They're describing a process, not an ideal; in fact, endless compromise is a quick way to end up in the shitter.

However, it does describe THE HUMAN PROCESS, which is to zigzag between extremes because we are emotional creatures (emotions are quick responses designed to avoid intellectual lock-up for those who cannot articulate in logic a logical path).

Metal followed this.

Black Sabbath was one of those bands that no one could quantify, so the English bred it into a lower order (Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple) and came up with a rock-metal hybrid called "heavy metal" but now seen more as "hard rock."

Then there was the non-commercial response to that commercial response to a non-commercial response: the NWOBHM.

After the NWOBHM petered out, probably about the same time Def Leppard dominated the charts with "Pyromania," speed metal came around. Non-commercial response.

Then a few years later, speed metal was burnt, and death metal took over.

Then Cannibal Corpse... we all know that sad tale.

Then black metal...

Then Dimmu Borgir...

And so now we need a non-commercial response. Wonder what it'll be.

Re: Dialectical materialism in metal
February 01, 2009, 01:08:30 AM
I think some would argue that it has already come and it is ambient/noise.

Re: Dialectical materialism in metal
February 01, 2009, 06:18:09 AM
DMBM - even though the dialectic you described does exist to some degree, I think that the best metal (art, idea, etc.) is not that which is derived exclusively through the socially constructed impulse of action/reaction, but that which exists because someone looked past or forgot about the dialectic altogether, and reached towards that which is enduringly real. In fact, I have always enjoyed metal partly because it wasn't, like punk, a form of protest music spawned by and essentially focused on social context. Instead, it dealt with an abstract world represented through dark imagery, which I felt I had 'a priori' been aware of.

Re: Dialectical materialism in metal
February 01, 2009, 01:38:21 PM
DMBM - even though the dialectic you described does exist to some degree, I think that the best metal (art, idea, etc.) is not that which is derived exclusively through the socially constructed impulse of action/reaction, but that which exists because someone looked past or forgot about the dialectic altogether, and reached towards that which is enduringly real. In fact, I have always enjoyed metal partly because it wasn't, like punk, a form of protest music spawned by and essentially focused on social context. Instead, it dealt with an abstract world represented through dark imagery, which I felt I had 'a priori' been aware of.


I think that dialectic described by DMBM was about natural cycle of occurence rather than some rational reactionism. Maybe mentioning Marx forced percepting it only as a social mechanism.

Re: Dialectical materialism in metal
February 01, 2009, 09:49:32 PM
Then black metal...

Then Dimmu Borgir...

And so now we need a non-commercial response. Wonder what it'll be.

I believe some of the replies to this topic are hinting at the answer. But what makes it elusive? The change in the dynamic of the market means the bands' development is out of labels' control and there are too many bands. Metal in the 80's and 90's was like Euclidean geometry; proceed in a straight line and you will find Slayer, and Darkthrone, like the rest of us did. In nowadays hyperbolic geometry everyone has their elite favorites others don't know about, don't care about and when hearing them can't relate to.

Re: Dialectical materialism in metal
February 01, 2009, 11:49:58 PM
As much as I would love to hear a brave new direction for black metal (the most developed form of metal), I think from now until the future we will only see very smooth refinement and development of current principles and techniques, if we are lucky. Averse Sefira is the jewel in the crown of current black metal. Summoning's next album may be interesting if it can move away from Oath Bound's very ambient/linear direction into something with a little more dynamism. I can't help but feel that Wolves In The Throne Room could be building up to something really worth listening to, but I'm a fag. Beherit's new album will probably be pretty radical, which is interesting. Of course, we're all waiting on Varg to get out and make the proper follow up to Filosofem. He's already admitted that his future sound is similar to that album, albeit that that was said a few years ago now.

Hopefully, ANUS will become effluently attatched to all that will be good.

Re: Dialectical materialism in metal
February 03, 2009, 04:51:02 PM
I think some would argue that it has already come and it is ambient/noise.

I agree, and innovators like Beherit claim that's also the future musical area of interest. The question is how much more we can squeeze out of that genre. I think the noise genre is artistically dead, save for a few genius acts like Claustrum. Ambient is also reaching a definite dead-end, but maybe we can do more to combine metal and electronic music, and even classical? Maybe something similar to Burzum's later two albums, but in smaller orchestral versions.