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Metal Score Project

Re: Metal Score Project
August 27, 2009, 07:54:28 AM
this a great fucking idea! can someone re-upload that Obscura MIDI sequence?



Re: Metal Score Project
August 29, 2009, 06:44:23 AM
I don't know of a better way to learn about the technical aspects of a piece of music. In this one, I found that the riffs from the beginning and end of the song frequently reuse an Aminor - Asus2 - Aminor - Asus4 "progression." (<- also used in the beginning of Gorgoroth's "Gorgoroth") This lends further credence to the idea that metal is "key less modal music" as described in another thread.

"Key less modal music". Well, I don't think that the term "modal" fits in all cases, there are a lot of melodic movements that doesn't fit in any particular ecclesiastic or modern mode (unless you have a broader categorization that I don't know, perhaps including "exotic" modes). 

It is very important to compare the monophonic properties of early music and metal. Do you think that it would be possible in sheet?

Re: Metal Score Project
August 29, 2009, 03:22:18 PM
"Key less modal music". Well, I don't think that the term "modal" fits in all cases, there are a lot of melodic movements that doesn't fit in any particular ecclesiastic or modern mode (unless you have a broader categorization that I don't know, perhaps including "exotic" modes). 

It is very important to compare the monophonic properties of early music and metal. Do you think that it would be possible in sheet?

I think the term "key-less modal music" meant that it was written like modal music, with each voice playing a melody and together they form a co-incidental harmony, except it is the chromatic scale that is used and the harmonies are mostly 5ths and 4ths. I noticed this in "Primal Breath" where the bass doesn't play chord roots, it plays a slow melody going up the scale every two bars.

Why wouldn't it be possible in sheet music? That, and, metal isn't always monophonic. Neither of the two I did where monophonic, and I wouldn't spend much time on a song that was, or I wouldn't be a good arranging exercise.


Re: Metal Score Project
August 30, 2009, 06:33:41 AM

I think the term "key-less modal music" meant that it was written like modal music, with each voice playing a melody and together they form a co-incidental harmony, except it is the chromatic scale that is used and the harmonies are mostly 5ths and 4ths. I noticed this in "Primal Breath" where the bass doesn't play chord roots, it plays a slow melody going up the scale every two bars.

Why wouldn't it be possible in sheet music? That, and, metal isn't always monophonic. Neither of the two I did where monophonic, and I wouldn't spend much time on a song that was, or I wouldn't be a good arranging exercise.



Sure, metal isn't always monophonic, sometimes it gets homophonic and poliphonic, but the concept of mobile fifths in metal is clearly rooted in monophony. I'm amazed precisely by this likeness of monophony in metal to early music, but I wonder what scored example would be iconic for this purpose, or even if it becomes necessary besides the texts in ANUS metal f.a.q.

Re: Metal Score Project
August 31, 2009, 10:32:05 PM
I was trying to avoid emphasizing the constant use of powerchords, because I don't consider it one of metal's strong points. If you did want to illustrate monophonic metal on non-metal instruments, a piano translation might be more appropriate than the symphonic arrangements I've been doing. Do you have any more strictly monophonic metal songs in mind? I could try to do a scores for one of them.

Gorgoroth - "Gorgoroth"
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=6I2OO8RG
MP3 - MIDI - Sibelius 6 Score - PDF

I used trumpets for the tapping part, which didn't come out as well as I'd hoped and had the timpani+cymbals in various parts. If you ever try to play Antichrist for someone and they don't like it, try playing them this next.

Re: Metal Score Project
September 06, 2009, 08:09:25 AM
Interesting results with that Gorgoroth song. The textures created by orchestral instruments doesn't work very well with powerchords and parallel conduction, so you're doing a good job finding a voicing of common practice as arrangement.

As for monophonic metal, it doesn't works in orchestra for obvious reasons.  An arrangement in early ensembles would be better.

Re: Metal Score Project
September 06, 2009, 03:17:02 PM
Guitar Pro is the way to go here, and there's already plenty of songs transcribed with GP.
There's also a freeware software called "Powertab" but it does not have the ability to add drums which is a big loss.

Re: Metal Score Project
September 21, 2009, 10:45:30 AM
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=48LP6C9S (piano arrangement of Obscura (song))

I think piano arrangements are good because it shouldn't be too hard to organise performances, which is something people around here should endeavor to do if they wish to promote metal ideals.  String quartets are also a good medium provided you are on speaking terms with at least one. 

Concerning the arrangement here, I haven't written in expression or articulation, but given that this lacks the drums or vocals, it will be necessary to make use of the myriad possibilities of variation on a classical instrument.  Seeings as most people who take the time to learn this will be aware of the core values of extreme metal, I think it is best to leave such decisions up to the instrumentalists.

PS. fixed

Re: Metal Score Project
September 22, 2009, 10:28:42 AM
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=76SR0AG7 Darkthrone - Skald av Satans Sol from Transilvanian Hunger arrangemed for piano.

As I have already mentioned, it would be a good idea for people to try and organize recitals where these type of arrangements are performed.  If you play piano or know someone who does, do it at their house, invite friends, family and academic acquaintances.  Use the DLA reviews as program notes etc.  If we as hessians want metal to be taken seriously, this is the type of thing we have to do.

A note on the arrangement itself, this is not a note for note transcription, as that simply wouldn't work on the instrument.  The material in Gorguts is complex enough to stand by itself, this however requires additional harmony to compensate for the lack of 'harmonic noise' provided by distortion.  I've kept it relatively simple, triadic harmony and droning bass notes to retain the ethereal texture of Transilvanian Hunger.  Without this type of adjustment, the clean tone provided by the piano will sound hollow.

I also included a brief quote from the classical repertoire, playing this is optional though, I don't have the score handy so I can't be sure how accurate the quote is.  For those interested the quote is from Rachmaninov's C# minor prelude (can't remember the number) and I used it to extend the climactic riff in this track.

Re: Metal Score Project
September 22, 2009, 03:35:45 PM
Just a suggestion for getting it out there: why not upload these to YouTube instead of megaupload - with whatever kind of video accompaniment you feel would be appropriate?

Re: Metal Score Project
September 27, 2009, 11:09:00 AM
Just a suggestion for getting it out there: why not upload these to YouTube instead of megaupload - with whatever kind of video accompaniment you feel would be appropriate?

When I have time to book a studio and record a few of these properly I will, but I'm not letting people make judgments based on midis.  The files on megaupload are sheet music only, no sound.

Re: Metal Score Project
October 02, 2009, 07:35:17 AM
Demilich - The Putrefying Road in the Nineteenth Extremity (...somewhere inside the bowels of endlessness...) (for piano and drums)

There might be a balance issue with leaving the drum part in here, although any drummer worth his salt should have dynamic control

Also a warning, transcribing this for piano gave rise to multiple technical difficulties, only reasonably adept pianists will be able to play this.

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=7S87X9LB

Re: Metal Score Project
January 10, 2010, 01:53:01 PM
This may same really random but a guy made Angel of Death on Mario Paint composer. Should I post the link here? Maybe it doesn't do enough justice not being a serious rendition, but it is accurate to say the least.

Re: Metal Score Project
April 28, 2010, 05:56:14 AM
Immortal - Unsilent Storms in the North Abyss - MIDI string trio version

Bumping this thread, because this is one of the most potentially fruitful things going on on this board.

Re: Metal Score Project
April 28, 2010, 04:36:37 PM
Immortal - Unsilent Storms in the North Abyss - MIDI string quartet version

Bumping this thread, because this is one of the most potentially fruitful things going on on this board.

I really liked how what you did here - instead of just taking the guitar pro tab and replacing "Distortion Guitar" with "Violin" you arranged it in a more appropriate manner - so I imported your midi into Sibelius and gave it a proper score.

And a better rendering since the default MIDI playback that comes with windows sounds terrible, I'd say.

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=GY09CTKI
PDF + Sibelius File + MP3 128kbps + the original midi