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Deathspell Omega

Re: Deathspell Omega
January 17, 2006, 09:32:41 PM
Besides, I don't go as far as others here in my derision. In point of fact, I don't think they're necessarily "following trends" but then again, they aren't what anyone would call groundbreaking.

They're good at what they do. What they do isn't exactly relevant, thus they are somewhat superfluous, but this doesn't stop them from being good at what they do.

DSO is a tricky band, and I refuse to outright condemn them, even though they have quite a bit going against them. I'd love to see them go electronic (a la late-era Burzum) :)

Re: Deathspell Omega
March 04, 2006, 01:57:54 AM
I know this is resurrecting an old topic, but if you want a direction to go in for newer black metal, try and see if you can locate a band that understands the direction Sacramentum was headed in with Far Away From The Sun.

Either that, or try and find a band that has the brilliance of Averse Sefira.

DSO are pretenders, aesthetic imitators, and nothing more.

Re: Deathspell Omega
March 04, 2006, 03:30:17 PM
Quote
I know this is resurrecting an old topic, but if you want a direction to go in for newer black metal, try and see if you can locate a band that understands the direction Sacramentum was headed in with Far Away From The Sun.


Perhaps Watain was the closest in that respect, though in the end their music became simply that of Dissection instead.  

Re: Deathspell Omega
March 04, 2006, 04:05:55 PM
Deathspell Omega's Infernal battles is crap. The drums are buried, seems like they're not there at all.  Inquisitors of Satan is alright.   Way overrated and I don't know what kind of sick idiot would pay hundreds of $$ for their lp's on Jewbay.

Re: Deathspell Omega
March 04, 2006, 05:09:49 PM
The Deathspell Omega hype intrigued me somewhat and I gave it a few listens then deleted it from my hard drive. Though it's better than emo-black metal like Leviathan.

Re: Deathspell Omega
March 04, 2006, 08:38:19 PM
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The Deathspell Omega hype intrigued me somewhat and I gave it a few listens then deleted it from my hard drive. Though it's better than emo-black metal like Leviathan.

I still dont understand why people call Leviathan "Suicidal" or "Depressive"..I mean 10th Sublevel of Suicide was the only album where he actually talked about suicide but other then that the music isn't very depressing....I have a friend who feels that Burzum in general is depressive does that make Burzum "Emo Black Metal"?

Re: Deathspell Omega
May 12, 2006, 06:30:10 PM
Props to Deathspell Omega for trying to revitalize the metal style. Like Satyricon, they fail... I'm not sure they know what they want to say. Do I want to hear someone talking, even if eloquently, if nothing is being transferred? I prefer silence...garbage clogs your mind like loose condoms in the ass will constipate you.

Sorry for all the fecal, gay, drug, death, parasitism imagery. I'm re-reading Naked Lunch for the fifteenth time. I like to leave it out on top of Moby-Dick and Mein Kampf to disturb visitors... generally, a few pages of Naked Lunch disturbs them far more than anything Hitler or Melville wrote. Then again, Burroughs did create the artistic concept of "heavy metal"...


Annihilaytorr

Re: Deathspell Omega
May 14, 2006, 01:30:31 PM
Deathspell Omega always struck me as a fancy clone. Philosophically they are laughable. I would rather listen to Metallica. Thanks.

Re: Deathspell Omega
May 15, 2006, 06:34:48 PM
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Sorry for all the fecal, gay, drug, death, parasitism imagery. I'm re-reading Naked Lunch for the fifteenth time. I like to leave it out on top of Moby-Dick and [/i]Mein Kampf[/i] to disturb visitors... generally, a few pages of Naked Lunch disturbs them far more than anything Hitler or Melville wrote.


I'm currently reading this for the first time. I was reading the part about methods of sexual torture on the train this morning and was laughing so hard that I was getting funny looks. The looks might have been funnier if they had known what I was laughing at.

Re: Deathspell Omega
May 15, 2006, 10:46:43 PM
The more I hear about DSO, the more I agree with the statements here.  They're very 'clever', but clever in and of itself isn't difficult to do.  Let everyone remember that Glen Benton was 'clever' at one point.  They seem to lack a genuine love of black metal in favor of a genuine love of pretense.

Vajra

Re: Deathspell Omega
May 16, 2006, 06:07:50 AM
Didn't the Hoffman brother's compose the earlier albums? I have no idea, but they strike me as more plausible authors.

I suggest fans here listen to Deathspell Omega's split with Mutiilation for pretentious vs. honest music presented in one recording. It's about 3 tracks, if I remember correctly and you can easily obtain it from the kvlter-than-thine-filelist Black Metal hubs on DC++.

Re: Deathspell Omega
May 16, 2006, 07:10:05 PM
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Didn't the Hoffman brother's compose the earlier albums? I have no idea, but they strike me as more plausible authors.

I suggest fans here listen to Deathspell Omega's split with Mutiilation for pretentious vs. honest music presented in one recording. It's about 3 tracks, if I remember correctly and you can easily obtain it from the kvlter-than-thine-filelist Black Metal hubs on DC++.



About Benton, I meant lyrically.

I personally find DC++ repugnant, and the ultimate example of quantity over quality.

Re: Deathspell Omega
May 17, 2006, 05:40:56 AM
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I personally find DC++ repugnant, and the ultimate example of quantity over quality.


And we are glad not to have you there.  ;)

Re: Deathspell Omega
May 17, 2006, 05:47:56 AM
It always gets me how mediocrity can spawn so much more discussion than genius; lets change this discussion to one about Naked Lunch.

SRP raves about it and uses it to fuel his immoral non-sequiters. which is fine with me.

But I wasn't caught in its world at all. I enjoyed it at the time of reading (some years ago), but subsequently I've condemned it as another case of the impossibility of making art in modernity, and the result of the quest birthed by desire for novelty: extremity for its own sake much like de Sade and B E Ellis. Is the iconoclasm worthwhile? (perhaps not a great question on a metal board.)
Is it more than juvenile excess? Is shock the only form our confrontation can take?

Am I a boring idiot?

Re: Deathspell Omega
July 18, 2008, 08:15:24 AM
A different take on Kenose...

With this  EP  Deathspell Omega have advanced compositional technique in metal to include progressive tendencies, 
which are so intricate as to be reminiscent of a symphonic layout, however this band do away with the excesses of 
that form, staying well within the confines of metaphysical contemplation, evidenced here by the ability to create 
music which is held together in the most precarious way, through vastly distributed and interlocking themes. This 
EP is the work of a band who place no inherent limitations upon themselves, and as such it appears that this 
EP is merely a stepping stone on their way to further greatness.

 Clearly lovers of atmosphere,  Deathspell Omega use dissonant, and often  arpeggiated chord formations to 
create their riff patterns, accompanied by battering percussion which often strays away from the main melodic 
features to create its own rhythmic ideas which then link back into the composition. The riffs are at first appear 
to be structured in logical pairs, which build create internal tension only to severely jar the listener when the 
next section enters. In these transitions the drums come into their own, being the only immediate link between the 
two riff pairs. As the songs build in complexity the sections are juxtaposed against  eachother, creating obvious 
dualities, which then either explode into blasting sections of ferocious intensity, or collapse in on themselves 
and give way to luscious but dissonant arpeggios, preparing the way for the next assault on the listener.

 It may not be fair to call these pieces songs, as this is clearly written as a single, if very extended, 
work. The juxtaposition of sections means that one is often given the impression that two separate songs are being 
played, although the appearance of duality is always resolved in cataclysmic collisions. It is like watching two 
strands being wrapped around one another, until they no longer appear as two, but are reduced to a single strand. 
Consequently, different point in the composition have to logically relate to previous and future points,  Deathspell Omega,
rather than merely repeating riffs, use many variations which rely heavily on rhythmic similarity. Just as how points in
two different cycles are analogous, so is every point in this work analogous to countless other points. This is the most
ingenious feature of  Kenose, it is structured according to a complex set of interrelating points, warping the listeners
conception of time into a swirling chaotic void in which all dualities are destroyed in the fire of One. After this has
gone on for some time, repetition is used which great selectivity, but they are forced against riffs from the opposing
cycle, and so the final collision is achieved.

 Leaving the listener with a sense of wonder at the depths and terror of the cosmos and existence beyond, 
Deathspell Omega have created a lasting icon in the world of metal music, it is with great joy that this reviewer 
comes upon works which still push metal towards greater metaphysical heights (depths?), and this work certainly 
does that.  Deathspell Omega are a band worth taking notice of, not because of their merely aesthetic achievements, 
but because they, along with bands like Averse  Sefira, show the way of the future for metal, if it is to survive as  a viable  artform.