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This Ain’t the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk

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Despite its distracting academic jargon, Steve Waksman’s This Ain’t the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk (University of California Press) pinpoints an underappreciated truth: While elite critics have championed punk as the vanguard of pop cultural revolution, “the emergence of metal has never been treated as a historically significant event.” Punk struck the intellectuals as properly conceptual and arty; metal just seemed like brutal noise for brutes.

Waksman, who teaches music and American studies at Smith College, retells the history of pop music from 1970 to the present. His topics range from the depth and richness of Motörhead’s pioneering thrash to the genre- (and gender-) bending theatricality of Alice Cooper and David Lee Roth. The two quick-and-noisy musical arts communities, separated by the critics, have mingled and cross-pollinated on their own, helping to create today’s dynamic and delightful world of self-chosen, mix-and-match subcultures and musical identities.—Damon W. Root

http://www.reason.com/news/show/133092.html#metal

The topic is great -- haven't read the book yet.

Objection. Roth grandfathered flamboyant wiggerdom and naught else. Van Halen opened for Black Sabbath's Never Say Die 1978 tour. Dave observed, mimicked and eventually monkeyed-down Ozzy's stage antics. That's where we got hairspray hard rock acts like Great White, Kix, Winger and the rest. They in turn gave "metal" its fun circus (remember Circus magazine in the 80s?) atmosphere that academia has been dismissive toward. If it's rock and roll, it isn't metal.
”The Revolution ends by devouring its own children” – Jacques Mallet du Pan, 1793

Objection. Roth grandfathered flamboyant wiggerdom and naught else. Van Halen opened for Black Sabbath's Never Say Die 1978 tour. Dave observed, mimicked and eventually monkeyed-down Ozzy's stage antics. That's where we got hairspray hard rock acts like Great White, Kix, Winger and the rest. They in turn gave "metal" its fun circus (remember Circus magazine in the 80s?) atmosphere that academia has been dismissive toward. If it's rock and roll, it isn't metal.

Your point is unclear.

Are you saying that, because the writer chooses weak examples of heavy metal bands, the observations themselves are flawed?

Or are you pointing out that when the writer is discussing an often-overlooked genre (as he himself says), he is required to use those bands most familiar to the wider readership?

It's the second one, isn't it.

Roth had his own antics going on waaaaaaaaaaay before they opened for Sabbath....Ozzy wasn't in the greatest form then anyway, and was no one to 'lift' anything from..

Or are you pointing out that when the writer is discussing an often-overlooked genre (as he himself says), he is required to use those bands most familiar to the wider readership?

I think you're right; we're overlooking the big picture and real topic in favor of some objection that doesn't matter. (Someone can always write a sequel later using only trve kvlt vndergrovnd bands.)

This is the real story:

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While elite critics have championed punk as the vanguard of pop cultural revolution, “the emergence of metal has never been treated as a historically significant event.” Punk struck the intellectuals as properly conceptual and arty; metal just seemed like brutal noise for brutes.

Go with that. It's important. Bicker later, when the battle's won.
ASBO

“Kurt Cobain was, ladies and gentlemen, a worthless shred of human debris.” - Rush Limbaugh