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Eugenics for better musicians

Eugenics for better musicians
May 28, 2009, 03:12:35 AM
In the study high music test scores were significantly associated with creative functions in music (p< .0001), suggesting composing, improvising and arranging music demands musical aptitude. Creativity is a multifactorial genetic trait involving a complex network made up of a number of genes and environment. Here was shown for the first time that the creative functions in music have a strong genetic component (h2 =.84; composing h2 =.40; arranging h2 =.46; improvising h2 = .62) in Finnish multigenerational families. Additionally the heritability estimates of the musical aptitude were remarkable.

To elucidate the neurobiological basis of music in human evolution and communication the researchers demonstrated an association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) gene variants with musical aptitude. In the previous studies the AVPR1A gene and its homologies have been associated with social, emotional and behavioral traits, including pair bonding and parenting. The results suggest that the neurobiology of music perception and production is related to the pathways affecting intrinsic attachment behavior.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090526093925.htm

From NIHILISM and EUGENICS mailing list.

Re: Eugenics for better musicians
May 31, 2009, 03:40:35 PM
Before getting too deeply into those data, try this:

Linda S. Gottredson - The General Intelligence Factor (found on the Amerika links page).

General intelligence, plus discipline and a sense of awareness to the world around you and your own motivations, are even more important than inherent musical ability -- you can develop musical ability with some work (even the tone deaf like Robert Fripp have become genius musicians) provided that you have raw ability.

While I am a strict biological determinist, I think that even a hardline view of that position includes the ability of smart people to use self-discipline to become more than they are. There are two fallacies in paying attention to your intelligence without that caveat: (a) you will conclude you are smart, and then stop trying, and justify yourself by claiming that society/God/African-Americans/Caucasians/Satan wronged you, and (b) you will conclude you are unable because you do not have the AVIH++ gene, and therefore do nothing.

Re: Eugenics for better musicians
May 31, 2009, 07:23:13 PM
(a) you will conclude you are smart, and then stop trying, and justify yourself by claiming that society/God/African-Americans/Caucasians/Satan wronged you, and (b) you will conclude you are unable because you do not have the AVIH++ gene, and therefore do nothing.

Haha, perhaps people like that are genetically predisposed to fail?

Re: Eugenics for better musicians
October 08, 2013, 01:03:57 AM
Until now, genome sequencing has been used mostly in research involving curious adults or to help diagnose children or families plagued by mysterious illnesses.

But many specialists say it's almost inevitable that DNA mapping eventually will be used for healthy young children, too, maybe as an addition to traditional newborn screening for at least some tots. It takes a few drops of blood or a cheek swab. And while it's still too costly for routine use, the price is dropping rapidly. Whole genome sequencing is expected to soon come down to $1,000, what it now costs for a more targeted "exome" sequencing that maps only certain genes and may be enough.

http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/health/2013/10/07/ethical-issues-emerge-as-scientists-peek-into-baby-genes