Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Classical Guitar

Classical Guitar
July 21, 2009, 07:59:22 PM
Albeniz.  Sor.  Carulli.  Segovia, particularly Asturia Leyenda.

Loads of others.  The John Williams recordings "The Baroque Guitar" has a lot of amazing music on it. 

Usually I can tell if I like a classical guitar piece within the first three notes or so.  If it's in a major key I almost certainly won't like it.  And many minor pieces shade into major keys partway through the piece.
You got faith in the end... but you can't fucking see!

Re: Classical Guitar
July 22, 2009, 03:33:56 AM
Francisco Tarrega interests me a bit, but I can't seem to find much by him other than two or three well-known pieces. He's the only one I listen to, really, but I wouldn't mind changing that either.

Re: Classical Guitar
July 22, 2009, 10:15:08 AM
In my experience they all have a few extremely beautiful compositions and about 50 atrociously cheerful ones.  Kind of like the Beethoven sonatas.

Just look for some romantic guitar compilations because those usually include the highlights of a number of artists.
You got faith in the end... but you can't fucking see!

Re: Classical Guitar
July 22, 2009, 08:28:15 PM
The Villa-Lobos complete solo guitar works album up in Audiofile is really good. It's available online for like two or three dollars if you look hard enough. Dude was underrated as hell; the final in his series of twelve etudes has a really cool black metalesque tremelo-based midsection.

Re: Classical Guitar
July 22, 2009, 11:54:13 PM
Francisco Tarrega interests me a bit, but I can't seem to find much by him other than two or three well-known pieces. He's the only one I listen to, really, but I wouldn't mind changing that either.

... two or three well-known pieces...

the only one I listen to, really,

you don't mean the Nokia tune, do you?

Re: Classical Guitar
July 23, 2009, 12:00:20 AM
you don't mean the Nokia tune, do you?

Well, I was saying that there are several I'm familiar with, but no, that wasn't one of them.

Re: Classical Guitar
July 23, 2009, 12:04:42 AM
I know, donīt take me serious  ;)

Re: Classical Guitar
July 24, 2009, 09:38:40 AM
It is probably very difficult to compose good music for this instrument and not make it sound like procrastination music. You know, lazy southern Europeans sitting outside and wasting time, enjoying their easy lives? I often have this picture in mind when listening to guitar music.
Whatever you honor above all things, that which you so honor will have dominion over you.

Re: Classical Guitar
July 26, 2009, 12:09:59 AM
It is probably very difficult to compose good music for this instrument and not make it sound like procrastination music. You know, lazy southern Europeans sitting outside and wasting time, enjoying their easy lives? I often have this picture in mind when listening to guitar music.

 bullshit

Re: Classical Guitar
July 26, 2009, 01:23:34 PM
Quote
lazy southern Europeans sitting outside and wasting time, enjoying their easy lives?

As opposed to what?  Sitting in a grey box for 9 hours and then going home to make some derivative, bitter black metal about how drab, meaningless and empty life is?

ChapelofTorment: I'm interested in hearing that VillaLobos etude, got a link?
You got faith in the end... but you can't fucking see!

Re: Classical Guitar
July 27, 2009, 12:41:13 AM
If it's in a major key I almost certainly won't like it.  And many minor pieces shade into major keys partway through the piece.

Oftentimes sadness and despair seem to carry a greater weight than joy and happiness. I found that as a teenager I did not generally enjoy classical works in major keys. However I found it to be trapping as I was trying to find something within classical music rather than accepting what it was trying to do. Just as a soft piece can hit one as hard as the loudest I have come to find that works in a major key can go as deep as those in any somber scale. If one looks at the second movement of Beethovenís 8th piano sonata one can see a great sadness amidst the more apparent peace and tranquility.

Re: Classical Guitar
September 15, 2009, 08:30:42 AM
If it's in a major key I almost certainly won't like it.  And many minor pieces shade into major keys partway through the piece.

Oftentimes sadness and despair seem to carry a greater weight than joy and happiness. I found that as a teenager I did not generally enjoy classical works in major keys. However I found it to be trapping as I was trying to find something within classical music rather than accepting what it was trying to do. Just as a soft piece can hit one as hard as the loudest I have come to find that works in a major key can go as deep as those in any somber scale. If one looks at the second movement of Beethovenís 8th piano sonata one can see a great sadness amidst the more apparent peace and tranquility.
Great example! I used to be very biased towards the darker sounding modes in classical, but something I realized by countless exposures was that often the perceived major/minor-ness is actually more of an interpretive construct based on the series of repetitions. An example of what I'm talking about is Beethoven's Sonata no. 23 mvmt. 3 (a very grim, headbanging piece, especially the last movement) where you have the main theme which starts on an f minor arpeggio (starting from the fifth, C) and then an alternating scale pattern (also f minor in first inclusion) which is recurrent in the piece. No one will deny that this is aeolian/minor/heavy sounding (for the uneducated) but something to watch out for as the piece re-iterates this theme is that as it traverses positions, it also changes in modality, to major. Now, in context it is no less powerful than the minor patterns, and in fact is necessary for Beethoven's true effect, which is the effortless mastery of making a single, simple idea diversified in many ways throughout an entire piece. It may be all well and evil to only play minor chords in black metal, but there is a huge void where the genius foresight of the masters would expand, modify, contort, and re contextualize. You won't find only one single type of chord in Beethoven's "atrociously happy" sonatas. From the superficially grim, to the majestic and downright jubilant, masters will utilize most, if not all of the basic triad modalities (major, minor, diminished, augmented) to re contextualize ideas.
I'm not attacking metal for its simplicity, and I'm not really criticizing the bias towards the darker sounds, I'm just talking about a different paradigm of heaviness perhaps, where it's not the sheer "minorness" that makes it epic, but the vast genius of utilizing multiple connotations of a single idea.
You wanna start talking about adhering to modality? Don't even get me started on Bach...

Re: Classical Guitar
September 15, 2009, 10:22:28 AM
The major mode works best in classical music because it has the strongest sense of harmonic direction.  Beethoven's most powerful pieces are in major keys ie. the final movements of the fifth and the ninth.  As for the actual emotional quality of the mode, it is not 'better' or 'worse' than any other (real) mode, people who get stuck in the mindset that music is a vehicle for a specific emotion (or group of emotions) are bitter individualists.