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Are Aspies the superman?

Are Aspies the superman?
July 21, 2009, 09:42:56 PM
http://scienceblogs.com/gnxp/2009/06/neurotypicals_are_irrational_b.php

The gist of this article is that, as seen through the eyes of an autistic genius or computer, normal people are irrational. They are ruled by emotion and drama. While I think emotion is a form of logic, the kind of "emotion" normal people have is reactive, paranoid, selfish, etc. Maybe Aspies should be our future rulers.


Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 21, 2009, 09:54:20 PM
Aspies excel at ordering and analyzing data, but humans of the higher type excel at ordering people.  We call this latter function 'leadership,' and it pretty much requires that one be able to socialize efficiently and move between human relationships effectively, and Aspies do neither.

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 21, 2009, 10:02:42 PM
There are certain things in evolutionary biology where a trait that may appear disadvantageous for an individual is advantageous in a tribe setting.

Let's say in a primitive tribe, a man arises who is almost unable to care for himself because his behavior is so bizarre and absentminded.

At the same time, he has an absurdly good memory for facts and figures.  He is a human computer, far, FAR beyond anyone else in the tribe or hundreds of miles around.

In certain situations this man is able to become absolutely dominant.  He runs the tribe, impregnates numerous women and his seed is flung far and wide.

Some people don't like him.

That's just fucking tough.

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Maybe Aspies should be our future rulers.

Hmmm, I wonder if there are any aspie leaders in the past.  There was some political group but I can't quite... oh yes, it was called the Aspie Party or something like that.
You got faith in the end... but you can't fucking see!

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 21, 2009, 10:20:55 PM
Maybe Aspies should be our future rulers.

An eclectic approach is usually best and not just for advanced research and development projects. Caste was a stable ordering in various civilizations for example. An emperor should have consice analytical ability and the commanding presence of a general or demigod to motivate. You won't get the latter from a human android.
”The Revolution ends by devouring its own children” – Jacques Mallet du Pan, 1793

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 21, 2009, 10:24:51 PM
Keep in mind that there are other ways of motivating people.

Ranking high among them is this thing called fear.

Many human behaviors decompose pretty easily into systems.  Systems are something Aspie people are real good with.   I'm pretty sure Machiavelli had Asperger's.  Reading his "Art of War" it's easy to see that he had some extremely esoteric intense interests, notably among them troop formations.

Also realpolitik.

It's a common misconception that aspies don't understand human emotions.  They understand-- they just don't give a shit.
You got faith in the end... but you can't fucking see!

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 21, 2009, 10:57:50 PM
It's a common misconception that aspies don't understand human emotions.

At the risk of sounding like a psychopath, these emotions are a tool. It would be best to keep all tools available in our toolbox and to master their uses.
”The Revolution ends by devouring its own children” – Jacques Mallet du Pan, 1793

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 22, 2009, 12:15:17 AM
You sound like an aspie.
You got faith in the end... but you can't fucking see!

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 22, 2009, 01:23:38 AM
I have one for ya. I understand Aspies. They're either data crunching and task focused tools or they have no place among us.
”The Revolution ends by devouring its own children” – Jacques Mallet du Pan, 1793

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 22, 2009, 05:33:28 AM
Is Asperger's a form of autism?

It is commonly considered to be so now but I believe there has always been, and still is some debate. It is considered to be an Autism Spectrum Disorder and some will refer to it as high functioning autism, although again others will refrain from calling it autism for different reasons. I think it has something to do with the variety of different characteristics a child can display that can be considered to fall under the diagnosis of Asperger's, which also makes it difficult to pin down what AS actually is. This Wikipedia article is actually far more complete than some of the autism websites I was looking at for a reference while still being accurate: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome It also considers the problems of diagnosing AS that I mentioned in the other thread about Asperger's:

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The cost of screening and diagnosis and the challenge of obtaining payment can inhibit or delay diagnosis. Conversely, the increasing popularity of drug treatment options and the expansion of benefits has motivated providers to overdiagnose ASD.[58] There are indications AS has been diagnosed more frequently in recent years, partly as a residual diagnosis for children of normal intelligence who do not have autism but have social difficulties.[59] In 2006, it was reported to be the fastest-growing psychiatric diagnosis in Silicon Valley children; also, there is a predilection for adults to self-diagnose it.[60]

Aspies excel at ordering and analyzing data, but humans of the higher type excel at ordering people.  We call this latter function 'leadership,' and it pretty much requires that one be able to socialize efficiently and move between human relationships effectively, and Aspies do neither.

This is the problem. People with AS are often devoid of an emotional component in decision making, making them tend towards the most logical decision. However, emotion doesn't simply inhibit us from seeing things rationally, it also drives our desire to find a solution to problems in the first place as well as recognizing this in others. People with AS may have an easier time looking at things for what they are empty of emotional investment, but leaders have to be able to both understand empathy and know when to move beyond it.

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 22, 2009, 05:57:58 AM
Many movies have nightmare scenarios of computers being in charge and then treating life cheapy (2001 is the at least one everyone should know).


But this is from a society where everyone needs to live forever, take drugs to avoid the actual living of that eternal life, and then relies on armies that are made up of the lowest class of men who will only serve for two years.  Maybe a computer running things for efficiency would at least be worth a try.

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 22, 2009, 06:21:50 AM
Most importantly, Aspies (or maybe I am thinking autists) seem to be lost, with no goal in mind or sense of purpose beyond the rudimentary survival instincts.

Check any of the even most cold-hearted logical evaluations of social systems - Foucault, Kaczynski, Linkola, even ANUS... they are very sensual, filled with yearnings for peace and beauty, emotional content in ways the standard newspaper columnist does not even begin to imagine. You don't get that from an Aspie. I assume Aspies detest us.

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 22, 2009, 10:02:57 AM
Aspies being supermen? Wouldn't think so. Many aspies (while having uncanny abilities in science/computing/math etc.) have difficulties dealing with everyday stuff like paying bills, taking verbal instructions at work or whatever; stuff you'd expect a superman to grasp quickly without much effort.

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 22, 2009, 10:51:00 AM
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/transport/article6719191.ece

Kid with Asperger's fools airline executives.

But in answer to the thread title, no. Only an Aspy kid on the internet pretending to be normal would make that assertion. When I was younger I used to pick on kids like that.

Re: Are Aspies the superman?
July 22, 2009, 12:08:27 PM
Keep in mind that there are other ways of motivating people.

Ranking high among them is this thing called fear.

Fear is a blunt instrument, and societies ruled by it inevitably reap a big bucket of fail (see also liberalism, Christianity, and Communism).

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Many human behaviors decompose pretty easily into systems.  Systems are something Aspie people are real good with.

Aspies are "real good" with certain kinds of systems and pattern recognition, but that skill doesn't translate to dealing with human behavior and interactions (which is one reason why talking to an Aspie is a bit like talking with a six year old: he may be bald and gainfully employed in the tech sector, but he's still just babbling about his Pokemons).

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I'm pretty sure Machiavelli had Asperger's.  Reading his "Art of War" it's easy to see that he had some extremely esoteric intense interests, notably among them troop formations.

Not exactly an "esoteric interest" among political figures in war torn Renaissance Italy.  Besides, Machiavelli was a professional politician and diplomat, with a long history of successful interactions with people, which pretty much precludes a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome.

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It's a common misconception that aspies don't understand human emotions.  They understand-- they just don't give a shit.

They may understand, but they don't process or recognize the emotional reactions of others, and so miss out on the social cues that allow humans to function cooperatively.  This isn't the same as "don't give a shit," which is a characteristic of sociopaths, not Aspies.