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Anus.com mentioned in Terrorizer's "Secret History of Black Metal"



From pages 10-11

"Quorthon's first genre shift would not only divide fans forever, but would also give him the opportunity to take credit for starting yet another genre, or sort of genre at least - 'Viking metal.' 'Blood Fire Death,' released in 1988, is arguably Bathory's most consistent and better aged album. Because it is the transition album between eras, it is still harsh enough to be called black metal and please fans thereof, but it also introduced an imagery and a swooping, epic musical approach that is at the core of any Viking band you can name today. A good explanation for this unexpected evolution is found in an interview for www.anus.com

'I began to listen to classical music shortly after forming Bathory, and from 1985 to 1986 it was all I would listen to... Around 1986, I realised we were actually just writing albums full of religious hocus-pocus, satanic rubbish and demonic crap. I was not a Satanist and knew absolutely nothing about occultism or demonic affairs, so I asked myslf why I should really be writing about that shit... that's when the idea to bring the whole pre-Christian Swedish Viking era into Bathory came about'"


Also, churcharson.com is mentioned, and quoted from as an example of "atheist extremism" in "The Dawkins Letters: Challenging Atheist Myths," by David Robertson. I don't have the book to hand to check the page number.


"Quorthon's first genre shift would not only divide fans forever, but would also give him the opportunity to take credit for starting yet another genre, or sort of genre at least - 'Viking metal.' 'Blood Fire Death,' released in 1988, is arguably Bathory's most consistent and better aged album. Because it is the transition album between eras, it is still harsh enough to be called black metal and please fans thereof, but it also introduced an imagery and a swooping, epic musical approach that is at the core of any Viking band you can name today. A good explanation for this unexpected evolution is found in an interview for www.anus.com

Yeah, I've seen that about one week ago but I didn't think it was something worth to talk about.

Good spotting.

I won't be happy until we get ANUS.com in http://www.takimag.com/