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Did all music die in the 1990s?

Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 23, 2009, 06:48:20 PM
Quote
With new albums out this 4th quarter it is certain that music ( hip hop especialy ) is at an end !

you have the metro homo's that wear a scarf around the neck & act gay & then you have the old school artist that are stuck trying to switch up & make auto tune tracks because they don't know what to do anymore. Lack of fans & the internet also don't help them.

then you have washed up artist that think they are going to save hip hop & bring it back to the 90's. then you have the unclassy trash of the south rap & the fans of that should have no say when it comes to anything that is important !

the 90's are done & are not coming back , so it's better for alot of the classic artist to just stop trying to make new albums that are not going to sell & take the classic title away from the old albums they had anyway.

Shit's over it aint coming back & music is evolved into pure bullshit with no talent or creativity !! It's not hip hop & it's been done for a while now so at this point it's better for most people to stop clogging up the internet with home made music & just find something else to do !!!!!!!!!!!

there is no money left so the hustle is pointless . It's just better to leave the classics alone stop supporting artist & keep the good memory of hip hop that once was alive & breathing then to drag it out & hope it will change .

Sure we can diss weezy & them for days but why even bother . they killed hip hop with the lack of creative lyrics & dope beats . also we killed it to because the real hip hop world cant unite for more then 30 seconds before we go back to beefing with each other over dumb ass reasons. FUCK MUSIC It's over with & nothing will save it !

have a nice day from your people at real hip-hop !

http://www.myspace.com/xrlrx

I wonder if it was an entropy of sorts: rock started in the 1950s, and got so quickly industrialized it assimilates anything because, hey, the audience is there and they want dumbed-down.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 23, 2009, 07:05:39 PM
This seems to be the case for nearly everything I can think of, that gets exposure to "the mainstream". For some reason, the 90's were just the pinnacle of cheese and over-saturation, which led those arteries to get so clogged with bullshit that the entity as a whole ended up dying. Once that last breath was heaved, the maggots; the groups, acts, bands, writers, etc that we see today, started to infest the corpse - feeding off it, and at the same time destroying what once was.

Naturally there are still people who "defend the faith", but you'll notice they are not worming around in the husks of the great ones who came before.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 23, 2009, 07:27:56 PM
From what i heard independent label sales haven't gone down tremendously during the downloading phase people are going through, and the fact of the recession. I know I still manage to buy decent albums, or represses of old shit that i enjoy. I think people are finally realizing when they buy popsinger_001 they arent gunna be listening to that record more than 2 or 3 times and for 15 bucks thats ridiculous waste.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 24, 2009, 01:42:33 AM
Hip-hop went through the exact same life-cycle as extreme metal, despite having less ambitious artistic goals to begin with.  The 1st generation in the mid to late 80s got by on sheer energy, the 2nd generation perfected the craft, the 3rd generation had no ideas of their own and became successful on the back of their predecessors.  Surprisingly hip-hop fans are in general more aware of this than most metal-heads are.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 24, 2009, 03:23:53 AM
Hip-hop went through the exact same life-cycle as extreme metal, despite having less ambitious artistic goals to begin with.  The 1st generation in the mid to late 80s got by on sheer energy, the 2nd generation perfected the craft, the 3rd generation had no ideas of their own and became successful on the back of their predecessors.  Surprisingly hip-hop fans are in general more aware of this than most metal-heads are.

That's quite true. Though I thought it started in the 1970s? Regardless, I won't forget a discussion I had with a hip hop fan a few years back. It went something like this.

Me: Why is it that your average hip hop fan doesn't choose to acknowledge the founders and originals of their genre?

Fan: Well, to them, its cheesy. They don't understand that hip hop isn't all about bling and bitches and money and cars and shit. See the shit you listen to, metal and punk, you guys have "classics". In modern hip hop culture, there are no classics. Just whatever wack motherfucker who wants to put his rhymes to a beat, don't matter if its saying something or not. Thats why you got stupid shit like Lil Jon in hip hop today.

Me: Well a lot of metal and punk fans appreciate the classics, but they don't understand how to interpret the classics and just wind up trying to copy them.

Fan: At least you guys appreciate it!

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 24, 2009, 06:38:12 AM
Goa/psychadelic trance died some time in the 90's (I'm no expert) and in come beeps, whistles and urban beats replacing well composed intricate melodies with simple rhythms for accompaniment that led to fierce climaxes. I went to a few Chicago "raves" last year and left feeling embarrassed in front of my date.   

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 24, 2009, 02:30:15 PM
Civilization exhaustion affects more than music. Salvatore writes some of the last epic fantasy fiction in the 90s.

In computer science, GUI and OOP are matured but not improved upon. The same goes for web scripting: Perl, JS, VBS, Active X were all matured more than a decade ago. The other stuff is semi-propietary fluff.

Warfare is not noticeably more advanced. Thermal imaging, DU and tungsten munitions and armor, ceramics, explosive reactive armor, cluster, thermobaric and FASCAM rounds have long been perfected. The only thing that raises an eyebrow is upcoming railgun naval cannons that are not yet implemented.

Transportation is not improved upon at all. Cars just look a little different, a lot of them now have tracking devices and there are more than ever in the world.

All the hustle and bustling activity everywhere is an illusion. Stagnation is setting in.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 24, 2009, 03:24:30 PM
You speaking about RA Salvatore? I enjoyed his books about artemis entreri far more than any of the other stuff, but I don't know I just like Jarylaxle and Artemis' personas they are good foils for one another. Every society goes through stagnation, its not until they are pushed to "need" something, or someone feels its missing that the wheels of innovation turn. Or some just stumbles on a good idea (IE: Black Sabbath, I guarantee they had no idea what their sound would end up bringing, and probably weren't even trying to be that innovative with it, just jam out some tunes, do some drugs, and drink some beers)

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 24, 2009, 04:38:26 PM
Every society goes through stagnation, its not until they are pushed to "need" something, or someone feels its missing that the wheels of innovation turn.

Most of the great ones thus far exhausted themselves and never returned to their former glory. Perhaps Germania and China will have another go at the greatness thing.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 05:11:38 AM
Goa/psychadelic trance died some time in the 90's (I'm no expert) and in come beeps, whistles and urban beats replacing well composed intricate melodies with simple rhythms for accompaniment that led to fierce climaxes. I went to a few Chicago "raves" last year and left feeling embarrassed in front of my date.   
I never saw any value at all in that genre, can you point out a few albums that might be worth checking out? And what is there at a rave that's worth experiencing? I never have gone but it appears its just repetitive dance music and MDMA.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 05:58:18 AM
Goa/psychadelic trance died some time in the 90's (I'm no expert) and in come beeps, whistles and urban beats replacing well composed intricate melodies with simple rhythms for accompaniment that led to fierce climaxes. I went to a few Chicago "raves" last year and left feeling embarrassed in front of my date.   
I never saw any value at all in that genre, can you point out a few albums that might be worth checking out? And what is there at a rave that's worth experiencing? I never have gone but it appears its just repetitive dance music and MDMA.

I went to my first rave recently, and it was interesting. I was surprised how dark the music was and the laser and light show seems to be a major part of it. The people were rather friendly, it was more like a metal show than the nightclub experience I expected. Unfortunately I wasn't on any drugs.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 06:31:23 AM
I went to my first rave recently, and it was interesting. I was surprised how dark the music was and the laser and light show seems to be a major part of it. The people were rather friendly, it was more like a metal show than the nightclub experience I expected. Unfortunately I wasn't on any drugs.
Did the music have any depth aside from being "dark"? Were the people actually intelligent and not just friendly with the personality of a brick? Why would you rather have been on drugs? It seems odd that such a apparently decadent place would have any appreciators here.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 06:46:21 AM
I went to my first rave recently, and it was interesting. I was surprised how dark the music was and the laser and light show seems to be a major part of it. The people were rather friendly, it was more like a metal show than the nightclub experience I expected. Unfortunately I wasn't on any drugs.
Did the music have any depth aside from being "dark"? Were the people actually intelligent and not just friendly with the personality of a brick? Why would you rather have been on drugs? It seems odd that such a apparently decadent place would have any appreciators here.

From what I gathered, the music is not intended to have much compositional value, the purpose is to create an atmosphere and rhythm for bodily expression. For me drugs would have enhanced this atmosphere. I didn't chat to many people, so I wouldn't know about their intelligence but if we used the same standards at metal shows we'd have to conclude most metalheads aren't very intelligent. I'm not recommending everyone go to raves, just thought I'd mention that it seems a much more spiritual place than the way it is portrayed, people aren't just there to get drunk and laid like nightclubs or your average local metal show.

NHA

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 07:01:19 AM
In computer science, GUI and OOP are matured but not improved upon. The same goes for web scripting: Perl, JS, VBS, Active X were all matured more than a decade ago. The other stuff is semi-propietary fluff.

In 6 months anyone caught using OOP will be sent to concentration camps in Arizona.

www.haskell.org

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 07:55:45 AM
From what I gathered, the music is not intended to have much compositional value, the purpose is to create an atmosphere and rhythm for bodily expression. For me drugs would have enhanced this atmosphere. I didn't chat to many people, so I wouldn't know about their intelligence but if we used the same standards at metal shows we'd have to conclude most metalheads aren't very intelligent. I'm not recommending everyone go to raves, just thought I'd mention that it seems a much more spiritual place than the way it is portrayed, people aren't just there to get drunk and laid like nightclubs or your average local metal show.
Why listen to music with no compositional value and only atmosphere and rhythm when music with compositional value that also has rhythm and atmosphere exists? I *might* be able to understand using sacred mushrooms or something similar for a special experience, but it appears the drug most commonly used at raves is MDMA, which is likely a neurotoxin. I also have a hard time believing people go there for "spiritual" purposes and not just low hedonism. I might be jumping to conclusions, but how you are defending raves as reminds me of the many people (mostly teenagers) who romanticize drug use as some way of breaking out of modern society, when in fact it is more likely to drag you into the depths of decadence that you despise. Particularly drugs such as MDMA. Psychedelics are a waste of time and money. At the end of the day, no matter how beautiful of an experience you have, it was all just an illusion.