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Did all music die in the 1990s?

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 09:21:06 AM
From what I gathered, the music is not intended to have much compositional value, the purpose is to create an atmosphere and rhythm for bodily expression. For me drugs would have enhanced this atmosphere. I didn't chat to many people, so I wouldn't know about their intelligence but if we used the same standards at metal shows we'd have to conclude most metalheads aren't very intelligent. I'm not recommending everyone go to raves, just thought I'd mention that it seems a much more spiritual place than the way it is portrayed, people aren't just there to get drunk and laid like nightclubs or your average local metal show.
Why listen to music with no compositional value and only atmosphere and rhythm when music with compositional value that also has rhythm and atmosphere exists? I *might* be able to understand using sacred mushrooms or something similar for a special experience, but it appears the drug most commonly used at raves is MDMA, which is likely a neurotoxin. I also have a hard time believing people go there for "spiritual" purposes and not just low hedonism. I might be jumping to conclusions, but how you are defending raves as reminds me of the many people (mostly teenagers) who romanticize drug use as some way of breaking out of modern society, when in fact it is more likely to drag you into the depths of decadence that you despise. Particularly drugs such as MDMA. Psychedelics are a waste of time and money. At the end of the day, no matter how beautiful of an experience you have, it was all just an illusion.

The function of the music is tied up with the event, it wouldn't make sense to experience outside of this context.  I really don't see the issue with allowing the atmosphere of a rave to absorb you.  It may not serve a 'higher' spiritual purpose'  but it's a good form of exercise which gives the individual potential for creativity and transcendence of ego, the drugs simply aid this.  Dance music in this context basically unifies the consciousness of the audience, especially if everyone is high as a crackhead on welfare check day.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 12:31:16 PM
Bah, I don't know what you're talking about esoteric. I've been to a few raves before, and with the exception of a few friendly faces, most of the people there were baggy chain pants wearing X-addicts who were content with waving brightly colored sticks around in weird patterns. I saw little degrees of intelligence in any of the people there. Perhaps the most amusing moment was when a friend faked a seizure and was thrown out of the house where it was taking place. Real life trolling at its best!
No.

Having reviewed the thread, baby Jesus is most definitely weeping at this point.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 25, 2009, 06:22:57 PM
At the end of the day, no matter how beautiful of an experience you have, it was all just an illusion.

The same could be said of real, sober, conscious life.

PRAISE OF DEATH, LIFE'S A DREAM!

Remember, rock music was called rock, because you were supposed to rock your baby in the back of your car all night long after the big show got you all hot and bothered.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 26, 2009, 12:04:59 AM
Goa/psychadelic trance died some time in the 90's (I'm no expert) and in come beeps, whistles and urban beats replacing well composed intricate melodies with simple rhythms for accompaniment that led to fierce climaxes. I went to a few Chicago "raves" last year and left feeling embarrassed in front of my date.   
I never saw any value at all in that genre, can you point out a few albums that might be worth checking out? And what is there at a rave that's worth experiencing? I never have gone but it appears its just repetitive dance music and MDMA.

Sure

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y64yrjDdriQ&feature=channel_page
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0FbcqFObRo&feature=channel_page
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACP_Ohnlb4o&feature=channel_page
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bKTB89cjgo&feature=channel_page
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1boYTkcsli8&feature=channel_page
http://www.amazon.com/Clandestine-Electronic-Subculture-Symbiosis/dp/B000004BS4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1253922434&sr=1-1

The last one is electronic ambient. Whether these examples would qualify as art by Anus standards, I don't know. However, there is composition and narration in Goa. And like I said, I've never been to an authentic rave. I was expecting this kind of music and experience with the three I went to, but what I experienced was:

Bah, I don't know what you're talking about esoteric. I've been to a few raves before, and with the exception of a few friendly faces, most of the people there were baggy chain pants wearing X-addicts who were content with waving brightly colored sticks around in weird patterns. I saw little degrees of intelligence in any of the people there.

and a lot of useless beeps and urban beats.
Keep in mind too that apparently, “Psytrance is not rave. Rave is for whistle and glowstick wielders,” so I guess these are two different things.

NHA

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
September 26, 2009, 12:26:31 AM
Techstep is probably more palatable around here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9THMxkCzXUo

(ignore the pointless visuals)


Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
October 02, 2009, 03:20:52 AM
I used to go to raves when I was younger. Not every weekend, but maybe once a month or so. I didn't get much from it. Actually, the music wasn't too bad, it was the people who made it shitty. Every dumbass on some kind of drug, and stupid whores giving each other hand rubs while inhaling vicks vapor rub.

Recently, I attended a drum and bass party, and that I enjoyed a lot. It was void of all the kiddie crap and hardcore drugs. The vibrations alone were quite intense. I suppose in a way, it was sort of a drug-inducing effect, but at least you were sober of mind, and actually had some lasting thoughts when the show was over.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
October 03, 2009, 01:13:14 AM
I guess here's my contribution:

At the end of every hallway is a man with a shotgun. You can't get past him; he has the fucking shotgun; he will win.

You will try to stay at the other end of the hallway as long as you can. Yes, this is the right thing to do.

However, at some point the clock strikes and the man with the shotgun picks up his Bible and blacks his boots, oils his shotgun and cocks it, and comes down the hall.

Experience is knowledge if interpreted correctly, and is the only real value in life, because the only real commodity is time.

The quantum of experience is also time.

Adults have one salient advantage over youth: they have seen how actions, ideas and attitudes have worked out over a lifetime.

So what seems like you get away with it today and next year and a decade hence... may be death in two decades. More than death, it may be the true horror of adulthood, which is regret.

Regret is what makes you want to walk on down the hallway early. It's the knowledge that with the same resources, in the same time, it could have been elsewise -- and better, since you've seen how each approach worked out.

Humans, we're like a sheaf of wheat, each stalk choosing a path. When the reaper comes, we know how each approach worked out. And I don't mean theoretically: we know in practice, literally, without doubt. That's regret and the man with the shotgun in one, because you can't go back. You can't redo an experience because the experience is context and your own knowledge and how new things were to you (imagine being able to listen to Pure Holocaust again without ever having heard it -- you're both excited and afraid you won't see in it what you do now).

Thomas Wolfe is right: you can't go home again. Siddhartha is right: you can't step in the same river twice. Arjuna is right: we are all symbols of the meaning of a time, not the other way around!

If life is a tapestry... if life is a symphony... if life is an equation... context matters more than the tangibles. The pattern is all. (Understand that and you've mastered idealism. Hint: takes about 11 years, which is why 33 is the age of prophets.)

You can't get your innocence back.
You can't have another first love.
You can't redo the decade from 18-28.
You can't get your virginity back.
You can't change a pathology once it has been with you for two decades.

Decisions are decisions; decisions are done. They are the vanguard of the man with the shotgun. When they have done their work, he comes. In most cases, his targets are compliant.

If reincarnation exists, it is so you can try again and have a first love that triumphs, or listen to Pure Holocaust the first time again and run screaming down the street: I get it, I get it!

All is all and all is now, all is one and one is now.

At some point, you start to want to stop fucking around with the dead pathways. Difficulty: people who have taken these pathways 90% of the time are going to face a choice -- (a) admit you were wrong or (b) defend what you did as if it was right -- and they'll pick option (b). Hippies, I'm looking at you. Aging punkers, even most aging metallers.

The point is that while there are experiences that fit every part of life, there's also always stupid and not-stupid. And really, doing things the smart way has more in common between the ages than it does different. What's smart at 16 is smart at 36 is smart at 64.

The sooner you find transcendent, brilliant, abstract and realistic truths, the sooner you step ahead of error.

Maybe, or it could just be, youth culture music is crap. Dubstep is crap, techstep is crap, most metal is crap... it's all designed to keep you busy in confusion until they use you for something. Aim higher.

You cannot beat the man with the shotgun. What you can do is make the hallway come alive.

Re: Did all music die in the 1990s?
October 05, 2009, 07:02:11 PM
Let's look at three industries in trouble -- movies, books and music.

Each seemed to "peak" in the 1990s with really rampant sales.

Each is stagnant now, revisiting old themes and cliched patterns.

All are having sales trouble and are blaming MP3s, but I'm thinking it's probably the obvious: the 1990s gave them the perfect technological cost/benefit balance to do everything radical they thought they could, and democratize the artforms.

Now, these forms are flooded -- and the talented people are either staying away, or becoming sick hacks like Iris Johanseen, Maeve Binchy, Jodi Piccoult, Richard Dawkins, Michael Moore, etc. who preach to the choir and offer nothing really insightful.

That's the same state metal is in.

Could it be this is an end of history pattern?