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Cooking

Cooking
November 29, 2009, 01:14:57 AM
Shane Bugbee (of A Year at the Wheel) has been sharing recipes online at Facebook, and so I figured I'd send some of my own, as I used to do with the 'larm back in the day. You have my permission to call me a faggot ("Opeth fan") for this, but I have a family and love them, and if you love something, you'd be amazed to what lengths you will go to feed it a nutritious meal.

Quote
BOLT THROWER BRUSSELS SPROUTS

- 6 slices bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
- 2 small onions, cut into 1/4-square-inch pieces
- 1 teaspoon sea salt
- 1 cup sour cream
- 2-4 serrano or jalapeno peppers
- 1 tablespoon dry Coleman's mustard
- One or more of the following:
 - 1/2 cup zucchini in 1/4-square-inch pieces
 - 1/2 cup red pepper in 1/4-square-inch pieces
 - 1/4 cup radishes in 1/4-square-inch pieces
 - 2 cups cauliflower in 1/2-square-inch pieces
- 1.5 pounds Brussel sprouts, with bases whacked off and outer leaves removed
- 3/4 cup feta cheese

1. Pour 1/2 cup of water in pan, put it on high, and toss in bacon with sea salt. Cook for 10 minutes.
2. Toss in onion and peppers, reduce heat to high medium. Cook for five minutes. Toss in mustard.
3. Chuck in the brussels sprouts. Cook for ten minutes.
4. Add in cream, stir in well, reduce heat to low. Dump in feta and stir in. Remove from heat.

Serve over rice or noodles. Serves four.

Others please feel free to share.

Re: Cooking
November 29, 2009, 01:35:43 AM
Ah! This is my expertise!  How about some classics:

Serves six to eight.Yields about 4-1/2 cups
enough for 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 pounds of pasta.


2 Tbs. unsalted butter
2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
1 small yellow onion, finely diced
1/2 medium carrot, peeled and finely diced
1 medium rib celery, finely diced
1 lb. ground pork (preferably from the shoulder)
1/4 lb. thickly sliced prosciutto di Parma, very finely diced
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 can (28 oz.) Italian plum tomatoes with their juices, passed through a food mill to remove their seeds
1 cup homemade or low-salt canned chicken broth or beef broth
1/2 cup hot milk

Heat the butter and oil in a small Dutch oven or a wide, heavy-based saucepan over medium heat. When the butter begins to foam, add the onion, carrot, and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until they’re lightly golden and soft, 5 to 7 min. Raise the heat to high, add the pork and prosciutto, and season lightly with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring and breaking up the pork with a large spoon until the meat loses its raw color, 3 to 5 min. (the meat won’t brown). Add the wine and cook, stirring, until it’s almost completely reduced, 3 to 5 min.
Cook the finely diced carrots, onions, and celery in butter and oil until the vegetables are soft and turn light brown.
Small bits of prosciutto give the sauce rich, full flavor and a traditional Italian feel.

Add the tomatoes and the broth. As soon as the liquid comes to a boil, reduce the heat to low and cook the sauce at a bare simmer for 2 hours. Add the hot milk and simmer half an hour longer, stirring occasionally. At this point, the sauce should have a thick but saucy consistency and a light reddish-brown color. If the sauce has thickened before the cooking time is up, cover the pot. If the sauce is still too thin at the end of cooking, continue to simmer gently, uncovered, until it’s thick. Taste and adjust the seasonings before serving tossed with your favorite pasta.
Adding 1/2 cup whole milk to the reduced sauce smooths out and enriches its flavor.
At the end of cooking, the ragù should have a thick but saucy consistency and a light reddish-brown color, tinted by the addition of the milk.


Ciambutella

Serves 4

   
3    ounces pancetta, diced
3    tablespoons olive oil
2    sweet Italian sausages, preferably fennel-flavored (about 1/2 pound total)
1    large red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and sliced
1    small green chili pepper, cored, seeded, and sliced
1    medium onion, coarsely chopped
3-4    ripe tomatoes, chopped
1/2    cup red wine
   Salt and pepper, to taste
6    eggs, lightly beaten
3    leaves fresh basil, torn into strips
   Big pinch of dried oregano
   Handful of flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped

1. In a heavy skillet over medium heat, combine the pancetta with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the fat in the pancetta starts to run and the mixture begins to brown. Meanwhile, remove the skins from the sausages and break the meat up. Stir the sausage meat into the pancetta and brown thoroughly.

2. Add the bell and chili peppers, and onion, with 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil if the pan seems dry. Cook, stirring, for 8 minutes or until the vegetables soften.

3. Stir in the tomatoes and red wine. Turn up the heat and let the mixture bubble rapidly to reduce the liquid in the pan and make a thick sauce; very little visible liquid should be visible. Add salt and pepper.

4. In a bowl, combine the eggs, basil, and oregano. Pour the egg mixture into the tomato mixture. Cook, shaking the pan and running a palette knife around the edge to loosen it (without mixing it all up), until the edges set. Lift the vegetables and other ingredients gently to let a little of the egg run underneath. In the end you should have a layer of mostly vegetables on the bottom and a layer of mostly egg on the top.

5. Turn on the broiler. Stir the parsley into the vegetables. Slide the frittata under the broiler to set the top and brown it slightly. Serve with plenty of bread.


Enjoy if you make these dishes! Having wine in the recipes is not crucial but adds a rich taste  to the dishes.

Re: Cooking
December 01, 2009, 04:55:10 AM
Making a Korean meal is really simple, can be healthy, and can be made in large amounts on Sunday for weekday lunches.

갈비 [Korean BBQ]

Meat:
1 pound of lean beef or pork, thinly sliced into 1 inch

Sauce:
1-2 cups of soy sauce
black pepper
crushed ginger
crushed garlic
chopped onions
sesame oil
1 cup of pure fruit juice. Use apples, pears or pineapple. If good juice can't be found use fresh chunks

Mix the sauce and marinate the meat for as long or as short as you like.


"Hot" sides: Things to be grilled with the meat:
4-6 oz of garlic cloves, cut into slices
King Oyster mushrooms, cut into small, thin parts
1 sweet onion, chopped likewise
Any seasonal produce can be added along, I personally like bell peppers or tofu.


"Cold" sides: things to be eaten with the meat
Green onions, chopped into strings and dusted with red pepper
Bean Sprouts, lightly boiled and drained mixed with sesame oil and salt
Lettuce: romaine works well. If you can find Perillo leaves buy those too.
Dipping oil: simply put some sesame oil in a bit of salt and pepper mixture

Don't forget the rice!



How to eat:
Grill the meat and cut it into small bite sized portions. Wrap the "hot" sides in foil and grill them along with the meat.

Take a lettuce leaf and use it to wrap the meat along with the other goodies. Rinse repeat. A tasty way to get all your veggies. This can be cooked inside as well, just toss the "hot" sides in a pan with the meat.

Re: Cooking
December 02, 2009, 05:53:57 PM

Enjoy if you make these dishes! Having wine in the recipes is not crucial but adds a rich taste  to the dishes.

Cooking with wine is like night and day.  Highly reccomended.

Re: Cooking
December 03, 2009, 08:49:59 AM
You have my permission to call me a faggot ("Pink Frothy AIDS fan") for this, but I have a family and love them, and if you love something, you'd be amazed to what lengths you will go to feed it a nutritious meal.

There is a perception of cooking being a woman's domain.

Cooking is challenging.  Doing it well requires patience, discipline and attention to detail.  Not only this, it fulfills a survival need; it is functional.

When the time calls for it, being capable of providing a nutritious meal for yourself and for your family is something to be proud of.

Re: Cooking
December 03, 2009, 09:20:20 AM
You have my permission to call me a faggot ("Pink Frothy AIDS fan") for this, but I have a family and love them, and if you love something, you'd be amazed to what lengths you will go to feed it a nutritious meal.

There is a perception of cooking being a woman's domain.

Cooking is challenging.  Doing it well requires patience, discipline and attention to detail.  Not only this, it fulfills a survival need; it is functional.

When the time calls for it, being capable of providing a nutritious meal for yourself and for your family is something to be proud of.

Most famous cooks and food experts are men. Women often cook a lot more basic while men tend to indulge themselves in details. But it's nice to have an excuse to call the admin a faggot :D

Re: Cooking
December 03, 2009, 03:07:00 PM
In Italy, most interestingly enough, it is women who are in the kitchen and men are outnumbered by far. I am very proud to say my wife is a great chef whose professionalism is outstanding. There is no cuisine she cannot cook, and how she approaches the food is the classic italian outlook: understanding iingredients in their season, as well as their traditional values. I myself value my italian traditions when it come to food, as there is an endless array that I can chose from.

Re: Cooking
December 03, 2009, 04:16:45 PM
My father is an outstanding chef. Like most Greeks, he once owned a restaurant.  Here's a recipe of his for beer grilled potatoes.

A few bottles of your favorite beer
Potatoes
Any herbs and spices you want to put on (he used oregano and Adobo I believe)

You'll need some tin foil. Peel or cut the potatoes in half in order for them to more fully absorb the spices. Alternatively you could throw some cheese in there if you like. Make small aluminum foil packages, twisting one end shut as you would see a piece of candy or a cough drop packaged. After you do that, simply pour in a small amount of beer, add in the spices, and twist the other end shut. Grill for about 5-10 minutes, depending on whether or not you like soft or crunchy potatoes.

Serves as many as you want, you can use however many potatoes you need. They come out rich and delicious. I would caution cooking them beyond 10 minutes as theyre likely to burn.

Re: Cooking
December 03, 2009, 08:07:29 PM
Thats a very good use of beer! I will have to try that!

Re: Cooking
December 07, 2009, 12:50:32 AM
Excellent topic, thanks for the posts.

Re: Cooking
December 07, 2009, 02:43:23 AM
New Orleans Bread Pudding:

2  Baguettes, cut into cubes and toasted
8 eggs
1 1/2 tsp salt
2  tsp pure vanilla extract
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/3 cup bourbon
2/3 cup milk
2/3 cup cream
2/3 cup raisins or currants
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar



Whisk ingredients (Except raisins) until fully mixed, soak bread and raisins in mixture- coat deep baking pan- cover with foil- poke many holes wit a toothpick to vent- bake @ 350 1 hour- 75 minutes. Remove foil for last ten minutes to crisp the top.

The sauce- Crème anglaise
4 egg yolks
1/3tbsp sugar
1 cup heavy cream
2 tsp vanilla extract

Place cream in a saucepot and put on MEDIUM heat.
Whisk egg yolks and sugar until fully mixed and the color changes slightly.
 
Add yolk mixture to the heated cream- stir for about ten minutes until the mixture congeals. When it coats the spoon, you're there.

Run through a mesh strainer if desired. Cool and enjoy!

Thought a pastry recipe was in order.




Re: Cooking
December 09, 2009, 12:26:58 AM

Easy tofu:
1 block of solid Tofu
2 tbsp of Olive Oil
1 tsp of Sesame oil
3 tbsp of soy sauce
A pinch of: crushed garlic, red pepper flakes, orange peel
A few finely sliced green onions

Evenly and thinly coat the pan with the olive oil and bring to a low heat. Cut the tofu into thin, rectangular squares. Mix all other ingredients [but the onions] together.
Heat the tofu until it just starts to change color, then add the sauce. Remove and plate. Toss the green onion sprigs on top.

Doenjang [된장] is a traditional Korean food that, since it is a fermented food, is believed to have health benefits. It's less offensive than natto, but since there are no parallels in western food maybe you won't know how to use it.

3 tbsp of doenjang
2-3 dried sardines, or you can use small clams
1/2 onion, chopped
1-2 hot peppers, don't use mexican peppers, chopped
chunks of tofu/potato/summer squash/bell pepper/carrot
mushrooms

Bring a small pot of water to boil, add the seafood. If you are using sardines remove them when the water is like broth, if you are using small clams just leave them in. Stir in the doenjang and add root veggies and hot peppers. When they start to get soft add the tofu and mushrooms. Serve boiling hot.

These two recipes should take no more than 10 minutes to cook, maybe 15 minutes if you include chopping. Low carb, low fat, but high sodium. Beats the hell out of canned ravioli.

Re: Cooking
December 09, 2009, 01:12:16 AM
Thanks for the great recipes! I love to see this variety and I will be trying these at one point...

Re: Cooking
February 08, 2010, 09:42:42 PM
Choosing to bump this, as I thought I'd share a recipe for a favorite Greek dessert of mine. (Also I'd love for more people to post recipes)

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/galaktoboureko/Detail.aspx

This is a good recipe, and for a bit healthier choice you can choose to cover the layers and the pan with whipped butter or a light syrup as opposed to regular butter. Also, nonfat milk can be used in place of whole milk, though the end result will come out slightly less "rich" tasting.

Re: Cooking
February 08, 2010, 11:32:03 PM
Best thread I've seen in a while. I'll be contributing some of my own recipes shortly.