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Dogs

Dogs
December 08, 2009, 10:40:54 AM
Has anyone here raised and cared for a canine? I know this may come across as some mundane babble dressed poetically, but I think caring for a dog is an expression of yearning. There are an almost limitless number of distractions from life to waste your money on, and almost none of them will leave any lasting impression. When you are taking your last few breaths, do you think you'll fondly reminisce about your fifth HD t.v.? Indispensable portions of your life are such because, without them, your life would not have that same sense of worth. It's almost inconceivable to think of life without these indispensable, fond memories - such as your grandfather's 67th birthday, your child's first day at school, or those long walks through the small patch of woods outside of town - and that's because they are the very essence of life. When you ask yourself if life is worth living, you are either immediately inundated with these memories, or (hopefully not) overwhelmed by regret. But I digress. Why would a dog qualify as such a priceless piece of existence? Many of us have witnessed clueless, middle-aged people purchase a rat-like mutt that has been bred into an inability to be self-sufficient, and then proceed to buy all of the self-perceived necessary dog products like blankets, coats, and massaging beds. Not only do they feel that such extraneous possessions are necessary to have the "dog experience", but their attachment to the creature seems to be surface level, at best. If the dog dies, they simply rush out to the nearest breeder and find a replacement. Yet they too are searching for something invaluable when purchasing their rodent-esque companions; even if they don't necessarily find it. What they are searching for is that tug on the heart-strings late at night, when you think about life without your dog and realize that it just wouldn't be what it is, and thus not as worthy. These people want that meaning, that ability to say, "I loved the hell out of that dog, and I miss it every day." Even if that relationship is something only we perceive, and has no material value in the world around us, it makes all the difference. It is our choice to carefully raise that puppy: to be stern with it, to laugh at it when it's goofy, and to cry when it finally let's go of its weary existence. We didn't have to think of such a thing as important, we could have coldly decided that the mourning was too much bother, but we did anyway. Have you ever seen someone talking about a dog they had as a child? They may have tears in their eyes, but they often smile. They smile because, even if the dog is gone now, they had the experience. They are able to look back and say, "Gah, remember Jackie? Remember when she was little, and she wanted up on the couch with us so badly, but she was too little to reach, so she would hop up and down for what seemed like forever trying to make it up there with us? Remember when she finally got big enough to jump up there, and she looked so triumphant? I miss Jackie..." Of course she will be missed; she was an indispensable part of your soul.

EDIT: For the record, Jackie is very young, and still alive and well. I look forward to seeing her every time I come home.

Re: Dogs
December 08, 2009, 10:38:11 PM
Man and canine have a long history together. But, the history was a working relationship until modern times. The beasts today are often mere accessories and entertainment which is another indication of our modern decadence. They used to go to war, hunt with us and guard the land. For canines, about the only legitimate, non-disgraceful role remaining for them is in law enforcement and fire-rescue.

Re: Dogs
December 08, 2009, 11:06:31 PM
For canines, about the only legitimate, non-disgraceful role remaining for them is in law enforcement and fire-rescue.

Not hunting?

Re: Dogs
December 08, 2009, 11:15:51 PM
I was going to say, we still use dogs for hunting, in England.

Re: Dogs
December 09, 2009, 01:22:57 AM
My father had the fortune of find a half siberian husky and half wolf mix in the woods during the time we were living in upstate New York. Wow, this beautiful creature had such a spirit to him. He always protected my brother and I, and he truly was like a brother as we had great experiences in the our forest lands in the upstate.

As far as dogs persay in Italy they use them to seek truffles, as using pigs was not ideal: the pigs really enjoyed those truffles!

Re: Dogs
December 09, 2009, 01:45:02 AM
I was going to say, we still use dogs for hunting, in England.

There's plenty used here (the US) for duck, grouse, turkey, goose and pheasant hunting, but only fowl from my experience.  I know quite a number of people who own dogs for that express purpose.

Re: Dogs
December 09, 2009, 01:58:33 AM
I was going to say, we still use dogs for hunting, in England.

There's plenty used here (the US) for duck, grouse, turkey, goose and pheasant hunting, but only fowl from my experience.  I know quite a number of people who own dogs for that express purpose.
They are useful for deer hunting as well. They have the ability to fish out buck and draw them near you.

Re: Dogs
December 09, 2009, 03:21:30 AM
Man and canine have a long history together. But, the history was a working relationship until modern times. The beasts today are often mere accessories and entertainment which is another indication of our modern decadence. They used to go to war, hunt with us and guard the land. For canines, about the only legitimate, non-disgraceful role remaining for them is in law enforcement and fire-rescue.

It's sad really, to have to see some dogs paraded around dressed up in clothing for instance, they aren't meant to wear clothes.. they are creatures. The owners simply get dogs because they look "cute and cuddly" nowadays. Owning a dog takes a huge amount of attention and responsibility, for someone that doesn't know much on the matter of owning a dog or aren't prepared, shouldn't get one at all.

As in canine roles in society, I saw that hunting was mentioned(that's a big one, rather popular), search and rescue or also known as tracking is another one. This seems to be getting more common, just about any dog could do given the training, while certain types of dog breeds are fitted for a specific purpose, such as a English Foxhound was bred for hunting foxes.

Re: Dogs
December 09, 2009, 05:55:11 AM
Owning a dog takes a huge amount of attention and responsibility, for someone that doesn't know much on the matter of owning a dog or aren't prepared, shouldn't get one at all.

This is true, I hate to see dogs left in the backyard all day when their owners go off to work. Also the ones that bark all day are annoying, and there are plenty of those around here. Cats would suit a full time worker better as they are more independent and can be left alone. I would like to get a dog but I think it is important to find the right breed first. I like affectionate ones but I don't like the ones that need too much attention.

Re: Dogs
December 10, 2009, 12:11:45 AM
This is true, I hate to see dogs left in the backyard all day when their owners go off to work. Also the ones that bark all day are annoying, and there are plenty of those around here. Cats would suit a full time worker better as they are more independent and can be left alone. I would like to get a dog but I think it is important to find the right breed first. I like affectionate ones but I don't like the ones that need too much attention.

They think that by buying a dog, you just force it in your backyard and that it needs to be chained up to a tree or always penned up. In actuality, the less interaction given to a dog or better yet any pet, will cause the animal to feel distant and hostile to being social with you. Domesticating and building trust will lead to a rather rewarding experience of you and your dog, you must be willing though.

I agree, cats don't require as much care and they are usually very confident, they tend to figure things out on their own. Cats are easy to litter train as well, start them off as a kitten showing them a litterbox or even finding cats at animal shelters that already have learned that behavior.

Deciding to get a dog can be a big decision to think about. The first thing you can do is just by using the internet and looking up different dog breeds- the vast temperaments, grooming needs, space needed, health issues and many other things you will look for in a dog. Spend the time researching and reading into dog breeds is really what you should do. Another option- Mixed breeds, most of the time cheaper to come by and mutts have a smaller chance of having health problems, which alot of pure breeds posses.

Re: Dogs
December 12, 2009, 05:44:23 AM
This just about affirms Erosion's statements about people who choose "rat dogs".

Calif. Shelters See Surge in Chihuahuas
Quote
A Hollywood-fueled demand for Chihuahuas in California has morphed into shelter populations that make up 50% of the dogs in some places. “It's been a slow and steady climb,” a San Francisco animal control spokeswoman tells the Los Angeles Times. “We call it the Paris Hilton syndrome.”

To stem the tide, which has made Chihuahuas more common than pit bulls at some shelters, cities are getting creative. San Francisco held “Chihuahuapalooza” to encourage adoption. LA took a more drastic step: “Flying Chihuahuas,” an airlift of 25 dogs to Nashua, NH, where they were snapped up immediately. While the situation is “alarming,” an official says, it’s not shocking. The reality of the dogs is that they’re “small, fragile, door-dashers, nervous, not a good fit for families." Uhh, and please adopt one.

How unfortunate - these poor animals are selected and bred without regard to how the animal will fare in the real world. Only to suit the needs of potential owners who want a little toy, not a good dog.

They're chosen, on the whole, by shallow people who need weak animals to make them feel better about their "higher" position in the world, I think. Sorta for the same reason why Nietzsche says certain people like charity.

Re: Dogs
December 12, 2009, 10:51:58 PM
I noticed that a lot of you said that dogs have no use beyond law enforcement/hunting/etc. What about the security of your property? My dog is so sensitive to his "territory" that he will bark at anyone who ventures near and thus alert us of anything suspicious.

Re: Dogs
December 12, 2009, 11:43:44 PM
I noticed that a lot of you said that dogs have no use beyond law enforcement/hunting/etc. What about the security of your property? My dog is so sensitive to his "territory" that he will bark at anyone who ventures near and thus alert us of anything suspicious.

Yes, well I have another opinion about vicious dogs. I used to deliver newspapers when I was young and one of them put a huge bite mark in my leg. I really don't think these dogs should be kept at all, unless the owner wants to pay a large amount of money for doing injury to an intruder.

Re: Dogs
December 13, 2009, 12:01:25 AM
Good post My Aids, Your Arse.. I agree, whatever looks easy to care for because it's such a small dog, people get duped and then give them away because they are a hassle. Makes me wish there was no such thing as the dog breed group- Toy breeds..

I noticed that a lot of you said that dogs have no use beyond law enforcement/hunting/etc. What about the security of your property? My dog is so sensitive to his "territory" that he will bark at anyone who ventures near and thus alert us of anything suspicious.

Being territorial is a trait dogs have, it's just a natural instinct. Just like their ancestors, like wolves, they defend their homeland and boundaries that they are familiar with and that they call their own. If it's a major problem, keeping them indoors and intervention will be needed to solve it with an animal behaviorist.

Re: Dogs
December 13, 2009, 01:08:46 AM
I noticed that a lot of you said that dogs have no use beyond law enforcement/hunting/etc. What about the security of your property? My dog is so sensitive to his "territory" that he will bark at anyone who ventures near and thus alert us of anything suspicious.

Yes, well I have another opinion about vicious dogs. I used to deliver newspapers when I was young and one of them put a huge bite mark in my leg. I really don't think these dogs should be kept at all, unless the owner wants to pay a large amount of money for doing injury to an intruder.

My dog has yet to bite anyone, and I've had him for around 10 years.

Dogs that will go after someone and attack them definitely need a behaviorist, but a dog that bites someone that encroaches on its territory is acting out of fear. Did you ever try carrying dog treats? That will usually get them calmed down.