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Indian classical and Carnatic music

Indian classical and Carnatic music
January 14, 2010, 10:25:36 PM
http://www.last.fm/group/Indian+classical

I'm learning more about this. It's like halfway between really technical baroque (Bach) and really technical German or Swedish folk (Vaesen).

I don't like the tropical drums but the rest is awesome.

Do we have any experts here who can help? I feel like an idiot knowing only a little more than "Ravi Shankar kicks ass" (I'm still not listening to Norah Jones though).


Re: Indian classical music
January 14, 2010, 11:26:08 PM
I've recently downloaded a very interesting collectiotn through this torrent http://isohunt.com/torrent_details/15769103/indian+classical?tab=summary
I really liked G.S. Sachdev, makes me want to read the Gita all day long. It takes a lot of getting used to its sounds and phonological jargon, so I'm still only exploring his works. When I'm through it I'll move on to other stuff off that collection.

Re: Indian classical music
January 15, 2010, 10:55:38 AM
http://www.wyastone.co.uk/nrl/world/raga/intro1.html

This link is an introduction to ragas, frameworks for melody and composition, which allow for indian classical music composers to be very dynamic and improvisational in their work. An interesting facet of ragas is the division of the day into Prahars or time periods at which a certain raga is best suited to be heard, in order to "colour" the mind of the listener most effectively. The concept of ragas is over two millenia old, and I believe is the basis of all music.

Ragas are very powerful and among the legends about singers such as Tansen ( 16th century A.D.) are stories of his bringing down the rains with Raga Megh Malhar ("Giver of Rain")and starting fires with the legendary raga Deepak ("Light")

Norah Jones has nothing to do with indian classical music. The beauty of indian classical music is that it is like watching an artist at work (dynamic flow of composing within a raag) rather than seeing just the final product (composition) which is why I think it is superior to Western CLassical.

eg, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hveeMDC6Dro&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwE-G0CFgtg&feature=related

Both maestros are playing a raag called Raag Malkauns, best suited to be heard after midnight. What they are playing is improvisation. It is like watching a sculpter sculpt or a potter shaping wet mud into a pot. A continuum, just like nature.

Also it would be better to look at not the technicality of the music but rather the spirit and philosophy of the cultures. According to me, Western Classical tries to build immense, magnificent structures , whereas Indian Classical is more zen in its approach, it flows with the universe, and celebrates it more than anything.

Re: Indian classical music
January 15, 2010, 11:24:38 AM
I often hear congruences between the application of 'tropical drums' (tabla) within Indian Classical music and Death/Black Metal like early Deicide or Mayhem. You could even imagine that the authentic Celtic rhythms Graveland utilize is a kind of intermediary between the tribal sound + high-'bpm' sound that tabla players can achieve, which are the most 'Metal' elements. (I'm sure, as with other elements of Celtic folk music - from the melodies to the use of drone - that these drumming traditions converge at some point in the past).

In addition to the names already recommended above, I found paying close attention to the work of flautist Hariprasad Chaurasia to be very fruitful in coming to understand the melodicism of Indian Classical music, which can be quite difficult to pick up from the kaleidescopic form of a raag, with all the other instrumental interfaces going on.

Re: Indian classical music
January 15, 2010, 03:01:03 PM
With early European music holding most of my attention for the past year, I haven't delved into this music yet.

This site surveys both genres of Indian Classical music, Hindustani (North India) and Carnatic (South India), and suggests some recordings:
http://www.medieval.org/music/world/india.html

Some fingerwork has produced the following suggested introductory recordings. Hopefully, the links are still good; I'd like to check these out this weekend.

Carnatic - http://differentwaters.blogspot.com/2008_06_01_archive.html
India: Une Anthologie de la Musique Classique de l'Inde du Sud - "The best general primer for the vocal and instrumental music of South India."

Hindustani - http://onurlar.blogspot.com/2009/04/survey-of-74-hindustani-ragas.html

Happy listening!

Re: Indian classical music
January 15, 2010, 07:59:43 PM
http://www.archive.org/stream/danceofsivafourt01coomuoft#page/72/mode/2up

It's an introduction to Indian music. This one's from the book recently mentioned in another discussion, "The Dance of Siva".

Re: Indian classical music
January 18, 2010, 05:17:14 PM
http://www.swarganga.org/raagabase.php

An excellent website that has a thorough database of articles, artists, raags along with samples and other information about Indian classical music.
It also has information about events happening in India as well as the United States.

This should be quite helpful to almost everyone with an interest in Indian classical.

Re: Indian classical music
January 20, 2010, 01:02:04 AM
That is Norah Jones? Indian? She is beautifully captured in this photograph anyway.

As for the serious discussion, I suggest you listen to Qawwali. Qawwali singer Rahat Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan recorded a self-tited album produced by Rick Rubin (Slayer). Qawwali is Sufi music and is mostly performed in Pakistan.

Re: Indian classical music
January 20, 2010, 06:40:38 AM
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan made a lot of cool music (I have two of his CDs), but it's worlds away from Indian classical... Of course, to our brutish Western ears a lot of very different shit from other cultures initially sounds the same ;)

Re: Indian classical music
January 26, 2010, 07:16:22 PM
If you want to listen to Carnatic Classical violinists, suggestions would be L. Subramaniam, T.N. Krishnan and Lalgudi Jayaraman for a start. L. Subramaniam has a lot of fusion and Western Classical projects too, so make sure you pick up his pure Carnatic Classical work.

Re: Indian classical music
January 31, 2010, 06:24:54 AM
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan made a lot of cool music (I have two of his CDs), but it's worlds away from Indian classical... Of course, to our brutish Western ears a lot of very different shit from other cultures initially sounds the same ;)

Excuse my brutish ear, must be due to too much Burzum.

Re: Indian classical music
February 05, 2010, 03:16:01 PM
Despite being an Indian I don't care a damn about Indian classical music, I once heard just a seconds worth of ravi shankar's music. Given my temparement and view of life and having hardly listened to it, any given day a composer like wagner, beethoven, tchaikovksy would be preferred by me if I had to make a choice between listening to Indian and Western classical music. One may try looking for Shubha Mudgal's Underscore Records, ITC Sangeet Kala Academy, Kolkata, India Today/Living Media group's label Music Today, Late M.S.Subhalakshmi. Shubha is an Indian classical singer and so was Late M.S.Subhalakshmi

Re: Indian classical music
February 06, 2010, 02:52:06 PM
Despite being an Indian I don't care a damn about Indian classical music, I once heard just a seconds worth of ravi shankar's music. Given my temparement and view of life and having hardly listened to it, any given day a composer like wagner, beethoven, tchaikovksy would be preferred by me if I had to make a choice between listening to Indian and Western classical music. One may try looking for Shubha Mudgal's Underscore Records, ITC Sangeet Kala Academy, Kolkata, India Today/Living Media group's label Music Today, Late M.S.Subhalakshmi. Shubha is an Indian classical singer and so was Late M.S.Subhalakshmi

I think there are severe inconsistencies in your taste of classical music. Shubha Mudgal as a great classical singer? What are you kidding me? Your are recommending compilations by unprofessional rip off "record labels" like India Today magazine? Most of the great Indian Classical albums since the last 30 years have been released on HMV.

I do agree that M.S.Subbalakshmi is a great singer.

But I would like to mention L.Subramanian as a great introduction to Carnatic Classical music(violin, instrumental)

For more info, check http://www.carnaticcorner.com

Re: Indian classical music
February 07, 2010, 02:04:56 AM
I need some help. I absolutely love the sound of the sarod, and I REALLY like the following piece of music::
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2OnBtNPTms

I've tried looking for Indian classical albums that are lively and sound "metal". However, pretty much all the albums I've found on the net have been awful, hipsterish nonsense where they try to sound spiritual and transcendental by being useless and playing one beat per minute (and yes, I've tried downloading stuff by several of the famous names). So far the genre to me just seems to be another form of technical masturbation designed to appeal to weird peace and harmony types who do yoga, listen to "world music" and practice wicca.

Can anyone recommend me some albums that might be more to my taste?

Re: Indian classical music
February 07, 2010, 04:52:57 AM
I need some help. I absolutely love the sound of the sarod, and I REALLY like the following piece of music::
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2OnBtNPTms

I've tried looking for Indian classical albums that are lively and sound "metal". However, pretty much all the albums I've found on the net have been awful, hipsterish nonsense where they try to sound spiritual and transcendental by being useless and playing one beat per minute (and yes, I've tried downloading stuff by several of the famous names). So far the genre to me just seems to be another form of technical masturbation designed to appeal to weird peace and harmony types who do yoga, listen to "world music" and practice wicca.

Can anyone recommend me some albums that might be more to my taste?

If you like the sarod, then I would recommend http://www.sarod.com/ - Ustad Amjad Ali Khan's works.

If you like the violin, I recommend Lalgudi Jayaraman, T.N.Krishnan, L.Subramaniam and Chowdayyah.

If you like the Veena(Indian Lute), then I suggest Chitti Babu

You can also go thro this list, seems pretty good for starters http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_prominent_Carnatic_artists