Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

429 exoplanets documented

429 exoplanets documented
February 21, 2010, 10:25:54 PM
Our place in the cosmos is far less significant than our humanzee pop culture, modern religion, and liberal politics would have us believe. This collective fantasy ego drama robs our present and future of greater possibilities.

Quote
Among the more than 400 planets found beyond our solar system, there are volcanic Super Earths, gas giants that dwarf Jupiter, and worlds with multiple sunsets.

http://www.space.com/php/multimedia/imagegallery/igviewer.php?imgid=5220&gid=383

In ascending order by host star name http://planetquest.jpl.nasa.gov/atlas/atlas_search.cfm?Sort=Star&SorDir=ASC
”The Revolution ends by devouring its own children” – Jacques Mallet du Pan, 1793

Re: 429 exoplanets documented
February 21, 2010, 11:22:55 PM
In terms of feeling insignificant I've always remembered (very vaguely) what I was taught in astronomy at first year uni level; that there are certain stars that can blast off incredible energy that would obliterate any life in its path for many lightyears.
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_ray_burst
I'm guessing this is it.

Quote
a typical burst releases as much energy in a few seconds as the Sun will in its entire 10 billion year lifetime

Extremely rare, but still humbling.

I've never seen expansion into space as an inviting or purposeful ideal. It seems like a meaningless fantasy to me; a blind discontentment with mother earth. I'm of the belief that if people went into the "great outdoors" more often we wouldn't be in such a sorry state; that this concrete jungle we've created has completely denatured us and put us out of touch with the beautiful, humbling reality of existence.   

Re: 429 exoplanets documented
February 21, 2010, 11:44:49 PM
That's a giant star going supernova:
1 pops out a neutron star "bullet" big as a modern city; the densest type of object known aside from a black hole singularity
2 blows off a superheated shell of gas; the misleadingly named planetary nebula due to its sheer scale over time
3 stray gamma ray bursts that would probably flash fry Earth into an ash cinder in moments

1 and 3 are continual variables out there that could end our drama for us without warning
”The Revolution ends by devouring its own children” – Jacques Mallet du Pan, 1793

Re: 429 exoplanets documented
February 22, 2010, 03:21:39 AM
Quote
a typical burst releases as much energy in a few seconds as the Sun will in its entire 10 billion year lifetime

Extremely rare, but still humbling.

I've never seen expansion into space as an inviting or purposeful ideal. It seems like a meaningless fantasy to me; a blind discontentment with mother earth. I'm of the belief that if people went into the "great outdoors" more often we wouldn't be in such a sorry state; that this concrete jungle we've created has completely denatured us and put us out of touch with the beautiful, humbling reality of existence.   
Not to disagree with you, I do see the importance of our biosphere, but ultimately what "carries" humanity's survival is the ultimate goal of our species, so let's not hop on the naturalist perspective yet. Populating other planets is key to our survival, as our planet/solar system will not last forever. I like to think of Earth as a giant spaceship, where you must understand all of its functions to be able to sustain the population aboard. Of course, our sustenance depends on the carbon cycle (very simply put) which is dependent upon biodiversity, which is what we define as nature.

I yearn to see the day where a space vessel can sustain itself indefinitely, or even replicate/maintain itself. Populating another planet is definitely on my list of "things to do," but we need to figure out our shit on Earth before we can accomplish this. I would argue that our technology is very close to accomplishing this, but the feasibility isn't there due to the backassed way this society works. Perhaps we'll never reach this point, so all of our work should be invested into Earth? This would seem rather fatalistic to me.

Re: 429 exoplanets documented
February 22, 2010, 02:52:28 PM
I do respect your view point, certainly it is the natural instinct to survive no matter what. However, as you've noted, there are many complications. The only real option at present is inhabiting the moon, mars or perhaps a moon on another planet in our solar system which would pose many of the same threats as we have on earth (the only real reason for doing such a thing is if we have completely destroyed the earth beyond repair; and yet preparing one of these planets for this purpose would surely take hundreds of years).

Now, without relying on wormhole theories etc,  I'll present the idea of building a vessel that could travel to a planet outside of our solar system; a journey lasting thousands of years if we're lucky. (Maybe there is a better plan of action, please tell me if you can think of one.)

Assume: we have found the perfect solar system with the perfect planet (almost identical to ours but untainted by intelligent beings) to aim towards; we have calculated the path with an astounding amount of precision (now I don't doubt this, but then there are things to consider like dark matter); we have cryogenic freezing nailed (if it's possible); we have a vessel that can self repair and with almost autonomous intelligence, as you've said; we have chosen the 1000 best people on the planet to insure a good diversity and quick expansion (never mind a government who will think in this way and be ruthless about selection, even towards themselves). There are probably many other things I've missed, but I think this is paints a fairly stretched picture as it is.

Is it not just pure fantasy? Perhaps we should readdress this in a thousand years, then I might have to eat my words (certainly the sign of still being alive would point to this!). At the moment however, I'd rather hold on to the hope of a 2012 transcendent being theory.