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Geeks

Geeks
March 29, 2010, 03:00:08 AM
Anyone else in here like to hack, code, or geek around on operating systems?

I've been kicking around the idea of installing an old PC somewhere with Linux or FreeBSD on it, as a kind of ANUS hacker box, although I'd have to know that our users wouldn't apply it to something nefarious AND GET CAUGHT.

I really enjoy some of this stuff. It's 75% frustrating, obtuse, obscure boredom like most technology, but getting it to work is a total rush.

Things I dig:

  • UNIX and many Linuxes
  • Networking and security
  • Programming, especially C/C++
  • Virtual worlds


Maybe there are others.

Re: Geeks
March 29, 2010, 05:20:36 AM
I used to work in network operations. I am currently working in the field of storage.

Interests:

Operating Systems Design and Implementation(currently focusing on Windows internals)

Cloud Computing

Virtualization

Network and System Security

Non-Comp Sc. -

Biology and Medicine(specifically Homeopathy and natural cures)

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 12:51:17 AM
i begin my journey modestly, studying for the CompTIA A+ Certification exam

JTA

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 02:29:23 AM
Programming: C#, Java, PHP mostly. I like designing/developing software projects when I have the time. I've also been doing some web development on the side (custom content management systems mostly) to bring in some extra income as I search for full time employment.

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 03:04:51 AM
Among some small to medium size coding projects "back in the day", I hacked a document keyword retrieval and web based search function integrated with a DBMS for a Fortune 500 company's end users. Other than some custom C scripting for a couple online MUDs, not much for a few years. I'd like to get a simple Perl document keyword search function together for one of the affiliated domains. Like home auto mechanic and home construction work, networking and building PCs is somewhere between mildly interesting and nuisance for me, so I prefer programming or short essay writing; the non-good with hands type tasks.

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 05:10:06 AM
I went to vocational school for IT, database administration a few years back. I learned some basic Java, C/C++. Did some work with SQL as well,  mostly basic language structures, and some attributes of each. Unfortunately, I couldn't really go into the in-depth coding work with such a slow class, and be graded on it.. so I did so on my own. I found it came natural to me, having prerequisite knowledge from reading through some old programming books at the local library when I was younger.. I ended up writing a QuickBASIC application to be used as an example for my instructor to use with other classes. Ahh, the good old days.. listening to Summoning and firing up ol' qBasic in class.. lots of fun. :) 

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 06:40:00 AM
I want to know how you geeks retain all these computer languages into your memory. 

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 08:59:56 AM
The same way I speak fluent French, enough German and Spanish to live comfortably in Germany/Austria or Spain/South/Central America, some Italian, some Portuguese, some general Scandinavian (Norwegian/Danish, Swedish, Faeroese [thank you, Tyr]), a fair amount of Russian, and a not immodest amount of Japanese (which I am studying at the moment).

On top of that, in terms of programming languages, I learnt Basic, Pascal, and Python (for lulz).  I know (X)HTML, PHP, CSS, Javascript, and all of that web-related crap (it wouldn't take me long to work out how to translate regular SQL into MySQL).

I used to be massively into the whole packet editing "scene" back in the beginning of the last decade (when I was 12/13/14), developing hacks/cracks for online games when there was nothing better to do.  It was entertaining, screwing with "the system", and revealing all only to a select few, but then I simply lost interest in most things "computer" (primarily because I started seeing/being shown how fucking terrible computer science is).

JTA

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 01:41:20 PM
I want to know how you geeks retain all these computer languages into your memory.  

Once you've mastered one programming language, learning others is a relatively simple task. For instance, in languages such as C, C++, C#, and Java, you declare variables like so:

int x;

Basic: dim x as integer
PHP: $x;

Each accomplishes roughly the same thing. The only difference is the syntax. Once you've learned one language, learning others is relatively easy. It becomes not so much memorizing each new language you want to learn from the ground up, but instead using the basic rules you've learned from one language (how programs are structured, how they "work", etc..) to simply adapt to a new syntax.

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 03:52:53 PM
Well, you do have the imperative/declarative differences, but, aside from that, McLeon is right.

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 07:38:18 PM
So, after you learn the language, you have to train your mind to create algorithms for programs in a short time, or you must learn the subject the program is based(music software,medical calculations, etc) thoroughly before you can even start.  Programmers are always the underdogs in the IT world for some odd reason and it takes the most skill and work to be one. Management who don't know two shits about programming likes to boss you around, give you insane deadlines, etc.  Being a programmer professionally is like being a slave behind a computer.  Probably the reason why a lot turn rogue. 

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 09:08:53 PM
Probably the reason why a lot turn rogue. 

Don't forget "fun". It's terrifically amusing, fucking things up for other people.

Re: Geeks
March 31, 2010, 09:25:27 PM
The same way I speak fluent French, enough German and Spanish to live comfortably in Germany/Austria or Spain/South/Central America, some Italian, some Portuguese, some general Scandinavian (Norwegian/Danish, Swedish, Faeroese [thank you, Tyr]), a fair amount of Russian, and a not immodest amount of Japanese (which I am studying at the moment).

That's pretty amazing, but it is a misleading response. In programming languages, the syntax is a lot of short-term memory, but all the rest is the same as asking, "how do you remember the way to solve various basic math problems?" That's the part retained long term. Once you've got the variables, conditionals, function calls, and loops structure down, switching language syntax is easier. I know structurally how to ask where the pub is located, but I don't know how to ask by speaking French, Italian, etc. There's the difference new people need to grasp.

Re: Geeks
April 01, 2010, 07:38:42 PM
Computer languages are converging at this point. There's always going to be a difference between machine code and a compiled/interpreted language, but other than that, we're seeing similar stuff. Object-oriented code has a lot to do with this.

This book:

Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software

Influenced much of how programmers think now: how to use abstraction to make programs that can easily be modified to do many different things. I recommend it to all of you codeheads.

Regarding programming as a job, yes it's ass -- most of those who are good at it are intelligent but not in any way beyond detail management. However, there are some great and genius programmers out there.

Re: Geeks
April 01, 2010, 08:08:43 PM
I prefer batch processing, myself.  Means I have more time to watch anime.

That's pretty amazing, but it is a misleading response. In programming languages, the syntax is a lot of short-term memory, but all the rest is the same as asking, "how do you remember the way to solve various basic math problems?" That's the part retained long term. Once you've got the variables, conditionals, function calls, and loops structure down, switching language syntax is easier. I know structurally how to ask where the pub is located, but I don't know how to ask by speaking French, Italian, etc. There's the difference new people need to grasp.

Well, the main point of my post is that it's not even terrifically difficult to learn several entirely different languages (syntactically, grammatically, phonetically, alphabetically, and so on) - the differences between two programming languages of the same paradigm(s) are largely "aesthetic", in that it's merely the translation of the machine code into semi-English which is different (though, of course, different languages focus on making different tasks more easy to code/faster to compile, which is why one might choose to write a program suite in many different languages).

Edit: Oh, fine - the main point of my post is that I speak an awesome number of languages.