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I have to ask this: Tough philosophical moral question

I am rather surprised at some of the responses here. I see where  Mr. Marcus is going and indeed he is deep in his thought here.  Maybe I am wrong and I would not want to question the abilities and the mental status/capabilities of my fellow members. I have been a member since 2001 and I value many of you here. Seeing how we are in a fight together, we need to encourage those who wish to follow this metal path, and at the same time stay rigid in our ways by testing the new guard. Yes, I am very courteous in my mannerisms and in my speech, but this in no way reflects the inner  strength I possess in sticking to my ground.

I have accepted that those things could happen to those important to me and myself.  What I can do is fight when they happen.  Death and suffering are a part of life and natural.  

I do not take the time to consider all of the possibilities and prepare for them.  That would make for a wasted life.  I also do not ignore those things as possible.  I feel like this is a state of mind in a way, that 'all' things are possible, that allows me to consider the consequences of the actions that I can control.  
How do the people on this forum cope with the chaos of the world, wich means any of us, our loved ones (parents, siblings, sons and daughters) can be killed at any moment or even worse, tortured for sadistic purposes of maniacs or bored people who decide to torture and kill for fun?

I'm not worried about this so much as that our species may fail.

This worries me more than those things that effect me immediately and is what I call my 'great fear'.  I am trying to make my life about ensuring that we, as a species, continue and advance.  I do not think a cycle of destruction and rebirth is good enough either.  I am but a small part though, and cannot do much of significance towards breaking this cycle or avoiding the greater end.

Thrashymachus

I have accepted that those things could happen to those important to me and myself.  What I can do is fight when they happen.  Death and suffering are a part of life and natural.  

Why not fight before they happen? Imagine the hypothetical guy in the OP who ends up killing your son is the one you are sitting next to on the train, pent up with anger at society. Should you just accept that the death of your son is inevitable, and repudiate all actions or speech which might possibly change that?

I agree that Marcus has a good point here-- until these hypothetical terrible things happen to us, they remain to us unreal.  What does it matter if we are aware of something if we have never experienced it?

To a degree it is our fear of unfavorable possibilities that drives us to make the right decisions.  Their weighing upon us is what gives us the urge for power in many cases.

Isn't this part of what Anus' nihilism is about: the fact that no given situation is inherently 'right' or 'wrong', 'good' or 'bad'?  Think about people who go out of their way to support humanitarian efforts (Haiti most recently).  Are they not the ones who are overconcerned with life's 'evils'?

Istaros makes a great point about metal's emphasis on death and war as opposed to love and peace.  However, this is quite different from one continually worrying about say, terrorism or the war in Iraq.  These are realities (or so I am told), but I will never experience them as such most likely; they are not imminent, and I have no means of seeing them that way.  However, I know I will die, and the metaphorical darkness, evil, and conquering nature embodied in metal is ultimately about life, and the way we choose to live it.  The horrors of the world and the horrors growled of in metal are two different things.

How do the people on this forum cope with the chaos of the world, wich means any of us, our loved ones (parents, siblings, sons and daughters) can be killed at any moment or even worse, tortured for sadistic purposes of maniacs or bored people who decide to torture and kill for fun?

I'm not worried about this so much as that our species may fail.

Out of curiosity, how do you think that would most likely happen?

To forza romana and antihuman, thanks

I have accepted that those things could happen to those important to me and myself.  What I can do is fight when they happen.  Death and suffering are a part of life and natural.  

Why not fight before they happen? Imagine the hypothetical guy in the OP who ends up killing your son is the one you are sitting next to on the train, pent up with anger at society. Should you just accept that the death of your son is inevitable, and repudiate all actions or speech which might possibly change that?

If I had even the slightest inclination that such a person would hurt someone of my bloodline of course I would try to hurt them first. You do not state what I believe you to mean very well though.  If I knew this person was going to hurt my child I would, first,  try to give them perspective, but if I saw no other way, the last thing they'd see is something pointy moving towards their neck or maybe the ceiling of the car.

Thrashymachus

I have accepted that those things could happen to those important to me and myself.  What I can do is fight when they happen.  Death and suffering are a part of life and natural.  

Why not fight before they happen? Imagine the hypothetical guy in the OP who ends up killing your son is the one you are sitting next to on the train, pent up with anger at society. Should you just accept that the death of your son is inevitable, and repudiate all actions or speech which might possibly change that?

If I had even the slightest inclination that such a person would hurt someone of my bloodline of course I would try to hurt them first. You do not state what I believe you to mean very well though.  If I knew this person was going to hurt my child I would, first,  try to give them perspective, but if I saw no other way, the last thing they'd see is something pointy moving towards their neck or maybe the ceiling of the car.

I must not have stated it very well then, because that's not what I meant. I wasn't talking about foreknowledge, but a kind of categorical imperative. It's no surprise that you would use violence rather than kindness if it involved a member of the family, but would you do that in all cases? A stranger?

Since you speak generally I cannot speak surely, but since I believe one should prevent all but imperative death without good reason, because that person 'may' be of great value to the world; I would still try to prevent it, because I do not believe that such a bloodlust-ed killer would be of more value.

I am trying to make my life about ensuring that we, as a species, continue and advance.  I do not think a cycle of destruction and rebirth is good enough either.

In a biological sense, this is "the" Human Question: do we as a species find a way to gain sanity and survive?

Namaste, Marcus.

We often say--and think we're the wiser for it--that if one ignores one's problems then they'll keep on resurfacing in different ways until one finally deals with them. But then I'm sure same same people who say this stuff will often try and give you their advice here, their opinions (I have not read the other replies to this thread yet, btw)... the truth is, you cannot consider matters like this one, the meaning of why things happen, you cannot consider these matters in isolation from one another.. if you manage to content yourself with an answer to this equation, then another equation somewhere else in your paradigm will manifest discontinuity.. it is commonplace to ask question like you're asking here and hope for helpful answers, for answers that will make you feel better.. and, the truth is, sometimes you will receive answers that make you feel better.. sometimes an answer will seem to fit with your paradigm, it will seem to make sense, but of course the accuracy of your entire paradigm in the first place is still not being considered...

I could try to impart my wisdom to you by giving you a carefully-crafted nugget that you wouldn't fully understand, through which I would intent to 'nudge' you in the right direction.. if these nuggets are crafted well enough then it's possible they can have the desired effects.. but I think it's always important to only ever give them nuggests on top of the basic, essential premise I am outlining here.. and since I don't think you grasp this premise yet, I'm going to dispense with the nuggets for now.. all I can really tell you Marcus is that you're doing the right thing, questioning in this vein about the meaning of why things happen, and you shouldn't quit.. and realize that the truth you seek, it has to do with those great mysteries of life, those things most people never think about and don't ever come close to understanding.. you have to realize the immediacy of it, you have to accept the suffering of ignorance in order to acknowledge the ignorance, to recognize it, for you cannot seek to overcome that which you do not perceive.. it is a matter of priorities...

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The problem is not that people have questions and doubts about the great mysteries of life, but just the opposite, that people are closed-minded to such thoughts. The problem is not that the standard person almost always has more pressing concerns than the great mysteries of life, but that questioning them about their prioritization in this regard will almost always reveal their prioritization is based on premature conclusions. The problem is that while on one hand the standard person justifies their priorities in life with admittedly speculative logic, on the other hand the refinement of said logic almost always fails to rank highly on their list of priorities. Or in other words questions in life deemed to have slim likelihood of ever being successfully answered, such as the great mysteries of life, these questions typically do not get pursued, for realistically there is only so much time in a day and nobody can possibly give their attention to every single potential learning opportunity that comes along. And this would be just fine, except that the question of determining what exactly is the degree of likelihood a given question could ever be successfully answered, this question, having to do with the great mystery of the human mind's capacity, is itself typically viewed as a question that has a slim likelihood of ever being successfully answered! So the average person has settled into a compromise position that appears logical with a bent towards practicality, but that is actually founded on excuses, covering up contradiction and circular logic, for the sake of remaining in safety and comfort rather than confronting the overwhelming dilemma of existential uncertainty head-on.