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Topics - druidakoda

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Interzone / Cinema
« on: March 11, 2010, 12:58:47 AM »
A cinema thread is a good idea, we could make this more general.

Tarkovsky and Kurosawa are regarded as among the biggest geniuses of cinema.

From Tarkovsky I'd say see Stalker first. The full movie, though nowhere near DVD quality, is here (I don't know how they've got away with this for so long):
http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=4947870279914964017&ei=NVpSS4POE8yP-AaCy42DCQ&q=tarkovsky&hl=en&client=firefox-a#

From Kurosawa the only film of his I've seen so far is Ran and this is apparently by no means his best. It is Shakespeare's King Lear set in Feudal Japan. I had the fortune to catch it in a cinema recently and was in awe through the full 2 and a half hours.

The film team that made this did an excellent job. It would be really hard to find cinema with more attention to detail, more intense acting or more thoughtful framing of scenes.

If you like your intense acting, there's absolutely no-one better than Klaus Kinski; try Aguirre the Wrath of God or better yet get the Herzog- Kinski box set. Here's a comparison between some inferior nonsense starring Mick Jagger(!) and Herzog's version starring Kinski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTgDXu_Nhys&feature=related .

Good cinema, like good music, needs great concentration. It's not fast paced, instant gratification, it is a whole world to immerse yourself in and bring great insight.

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Interzone / The brain acting as a reduction valve.
« on: March 05, 2010, 11:49:48 PM »
This is inspired by the current cannabis discussion.

Any of you who have read Aldous Huxley's Doors of Perception will know what I'm talking about here. It is the idea that the brain, rather than being a creative force, is actually a biological machine which reduces the amount of information we are allowed to process in order that we can function properly as an animal. This is based on findings that the main effect of psychedelics is to restrict glucose to the brain (a similar thing happens to schizophrenics naturally), and also of course on Aldous Huxley's own experience with these substances. This seems to imply some higher source, a soul perhaps.

I have had psychedelic experiences in the past and I can vouch for the fact that there are certain things you can see whilst high on psychedelics that are just not apparent in every day life; such as the complete intricate complexity of all the ripplings in a river or pond where each motion is "separated" out fully, or the true ugliness of the human being creature (as if for that period of time you are beyond human and can look at your strange body in all it's civilised weirdness). The most poignant thing I can think of was looking at a spot I had. I could see right down "through" the skin almost to the very root of the problem, but when I looked at it the next day i couldn't see what I'd seen at all, just an ordinary, insignificant blemish. A friend of mine has theorised that human's have a sort of social persona/aura which masks their true appearance, even to themselves, perhaps based on hormones.

Now maybe you're thinking "this is just because you're mind is being fucked up", but that simply isn't a good enough explanation for it. It raises this whole other question of why that would happen. What is causing your mind to make up such perfectly real sights right in front of your seemingly sober enough (i.e. not incapacitated) mind?

I do not condone the social use of drugs anymore, but I've always had a fondness for this idea and would like your opinions on it.

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Interzone / Colour's effect on mood
« on: February 28, 2010, 04:36:21 PM »
For 6 months I had a dark blue bedroom, now I never felt comfortable in this bedroom and always spent as much time as possible in the living room or elsewhere. Recently I painted my room white as I was finding the room far too dark and didn't like the colour much. Now, it seems to of had some magical effect on my mood. Before I was verging on depression and was feeling very lonely and isolated from friends, but now I am back to the way I was before having a blue room and, what's more, I am really enjoying spending time there (plus the fact that I don't need to switch the light on before it gets dark).

This really drove home the idea that colours have a large effect on us, perhaps much larger than what we give them credit for. Now would this stem from the biological manifestations of a colour's meaning? Or is it that species evolved certain colours from noticing the effect of the colour on it's predators/prey? Or would you say the mood aspect is completely ethereal and not connected to biological evolution?

(Is it fine to use British spellings here?)
 


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Interzone / Antonin Artaud
« on: February 12, 2010, 11:18:08 PM »
Antonin Artaud was one of those "crazy" genius' that crop up every now and again; spending much of his time institutionalised and/or medicated on heroin (which they subsequently banned from use as medication which pissed him off a great deal). Here are his philosophical views from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonin_Artaud:

                                      "Imagination, to Artaud, was reality; he considered dreams, thoughts and delusions as no less real than the "outside" world.
                                       To him, reality appeared to be a consensus, the same consensus the audience accepts when they enter a theatre to see a
                                       play and, for a time, pretend that what they are seeing is real.

                                       "Artaud saw suffering as essential to existence, and thus rejected all utopias as inevitable dystopia."

He was to theater what extreme metal is to music. His Theater of Cruelty turned many of the performers in to quivering wrecks, and induced some to vomit! I only wish I could witness his plays, but it seems his work very rarely played and perhaps then only for academia. He was also a great writer; fortunately his books are available online etc. Basically this thread is just to spread the knowledge of this obscure, raw figure to people who can understand his mentality and vision. Has anyone here seen any of his stuff or anything similar? 

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