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Messages - Biannual Scab Miracle

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Interzone / Re: Romanticism/Nihilism Compare and Contrast
« on: October 21, 2012, 08:46:11 AM »
Thanks for your replies, Bill Hopkins.  I think you're right about morality.  Upon reflection, I'm more concerned with ANUS's definition of morality than my own. Nitpicky, I know. I get it from my dad.

I am only in agreement with nihilism insofar as it allows preferences. In my ideal a nihilist can still have preferences, because once nihilism removes the bad values there is still plenty room for them.  In fact, people without preferences put of an "uncanny valley" vibe and are avoided like the plague by more social types (not that social people rejecting them is a gauge for their value, haha.) 

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Interzone / Romanticism/Nihilism Compare and Contrast
« on: October 17, 2012, 05:21:29 PM »
If you were the put romanticism and Anus's definition of nihilism into a Venn diagram, what would result?  They seem to be opposites.  Far as I can recollect Nihilism is about strict logic and rooting out human distortion of reality.  Romanticism on the other hand seems to be about suspension of disbelief and investing time and hope into imagination, fantasy, will, and creativity.  So perhaps the overlapping area includes imaginative goals and ideas that are achievable and consistent, respectively, in the real world?

I'm also confused about the role of morality in all of this.  I suspect Prozak might say we measure actions by the beauty and efficacy of their results, and this is a more realistic (inherent?) system than morality.  I would then continue to irk him by suggesting that we first have to define beauty/what is beautiful and what are good goals in the first place, which require some establishment of morals.  Even then, things like honor still call the Machiavellian approach into question.  How does Anus define morality?

Nihilism leans more toward inanimate, will-less logic and romanticism towards will and emotion, but is it that simple?


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Interzone / a small ponderance
« on: September 17, 2012, 08:26:08 AM »
Why do we not have plantations around anymore?
Because we are moral ubermensch or because we now have technology that dwarfs the output of human labor? 
It's the latter. If the world was starving and we didn't have the technology, plantations would become a retro hit real fast.

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Interzone / Re: Parallel realities.
« on: April 12, 2012, 05:17:39 AM »
Seems unnecessarily extreme. Either good or perversion.

I did that consciously; kind of just poking the beehive right now.  Hopefully on a future thread I will have an insight of my own to present, but for now I'm appreciative of the thought-provoking responses.

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Interzone / Re: Parallel realities.
« on: April 12, 2012, 04:04:27 AM »
How much wiggle room is there in this reality?  If there is really only one true spiritual path, then are specialization and preference perversions? 

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Interzone / Re: Fate
« on: March 30, 2012, 05:58:43 AM »
There is no underlying music in the universe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAPNfKADA7Y

lol. sorry had to do it.

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Metal / Re: Doom metal
« on: March 28, 2012, 03:59:00 AM »
I find Cathedral-F.O.E to be a great salve in times of grotesque ass disgust, when you need to decompose and you want to at least do it with some measure of grace and take some kind of aesthetic photograph to remember it by.

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Metal / Re: What is heavy?
« on: March 25, 2012, 05:38:13 AM »
Thus the anti-poser attitude in metal.  Also, I think the death metal approach of building factory riffs up towards distinction finds a match in the way people who are taken seriously can say amazing things without resorting to paroxysm.  Zooming in, a death metal riff that makes sense only in terms of what preceded it is like a usually generic statement that takes on life given the speaker's history.

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Metal / Re: Mental Tablature
« on: March 21, 2012, 12:48:05 PM »
There's a program called Audacity that will let you change the speed without changing the pitch, but you use the "change tempo" effect rather than "change speed."  Or is that what you're using already?

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Metal / Re: Good electronic music
« on: March 21, 2012, 12:42:03 PM »
lf you ever go to Myrtle Beach on spring break, drive down the strip playing Hamburger Lady at full blast.  It will scare some wiggers' penises back up into their torsos.

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Metal / Re: Mental Tablature
« on: March 11, 2012, 10:13:55 PM »
I find it interesting that you would do this mental tabbing before trying to play the song on the guitar (and that one might not remember the entirety of a song) - do you learn the notes that are being played in a song individually, or do you learn how the song as a whole sounds? 

I go note by note; pretty linear.  It's actually rare that I get a song down so completely that I can play it on guitar right of the bat, though.  I usually have to go back and relisten to something.

Wanna tab out the solo to Chambers of Dis? Seems like a diminished scale but i cant get it to sound right.

Haha I can try. 
This is probably leaving out a lot of the little notes in the middle of the sweeps, especially in the last leg.  I've tried to preserve some impression of the rhythm with the dashes:

0---(-1)---0-(-5)-0-5-4-0-4-5-4-0-4-5-7-8-5-7---7-11-16-17-12-11-15-13-12-8-7-5--13-15-13-12-8-7-5-3-0---8---2----0---10 (whammy bar)---(-2)-5-(-2)-5-(-2)-5-(-7)-5-3-0-1-0-1-(-7)-(-5)-3-1-0-(-4)-(-2)-(-7)-(-12)-(-13)-(-15)-(-17)--(-13)--(-15)--(-13)


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Metal / Mental Tablature
« on: March 06, 2012, 02:47:47 AM »
It has become a habit for me to mentally "tab out" music as it plays, like a guitar tab minus the distribution over strings; basically I keep track of the notation of the music using the chromatic scale.  So the beginning of the US national anthem would go 7-4-0-4-7-12-----16-14-12-4-6-7, where 12 is the same as 0 but an octave higher.  
The advantages:
-You can immediately go play the song on guitar if you can remember it all.
-It's a fun mental challenge with 7 variables and, on paper, unlimited possibilities of arrangement; it's a good way to stay sharp.
-It allows you to see further into the DNA of bands, genres, and possibly time periods by revealing predominant intervals and recurrent patterns
The disadvantage:
-It can distract from other aspects of the music such as its textural nuance, spirit, and logical progression.  For example you might miss the fact that riff Z is a combination of riff X and riff Y.  However, this becomes less of a problem as you get familiar with combinations and get better at multi-tasking.

Does anyone else do this?

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Metal / Re: Power/Progressive Metal
« on: March 05, 2012, 11:07:41 PM »
Have you ever stopped to think that maybe, just maybe, the crowd might be right?

There's nothing intelligent about force and war.  In fact, it is the inverse.  They're childish concepts stemming from sexual frustation and subconscious guilt.

Maybe I'm talking to a corpse, but force is the very thing that maintains the semblance of peace in our society, which you seem to like based on your posts in this thread.

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