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271
Interzone / Re: Meaning.
« on: December 06, 2013, 03:36:43 AM »
I get what Vigilance is saying.

Consider that he started with an assumption: Meaning is not real, meaning is the product of human minds. It is the most basic platform from which we develop ideas like nihilism.

Now what he means is clear; The more meaning you find in something, the more withdrawn you are from the actual meaningless reality of the something.

My car means a lot to me, because I rely on it to achieve my goals (which are admittedly quite meaningless). To someone else who does not rely on my car's utility, my car is less meaningful to them. It does not represent anything outside of its own existence as a car.

So meaning is basically a measurement of the significance of utility reflected in an object (or idea, song, what have you).

Now of course I see both sides and can not make a decision on the meaningfulness of meaning. So it is a human invention, a psychological crutch or restraint. So is my car, yet I accomplish tasks with it, and so cause changes in the actual reality surrounding myself.

Real, not real. Sometimes I only confuse myself more by drawing a distinction.

272
Interzone / Re: Who/What is Satan?
« on: December 06, 2013, 03:28:00 AM »
You think that Evil doesn't exist without egotistical delusion?

273
Interzone / Re: Night
« on: December 06, 2013, 03:21:15 AM »
I am jealous of insects and birds for their ability to optically sense colors in the ultraviolet spectrum. Cameras can't really get us close, unfortunately, but that is an interesting new view that we wouldn't get any other way.

274
Interzone / Re: Who/What is Satan?
« on: December 05, 2013, 03:49:09 PM »
Maybe Satan is All The Above.

Or maybe He is You and I.

275
Interzone / Re: Black Holes.
« on: December 04, 2013, 05:18:24 AM »
Quote
Everyone trusts the word of scientists that they just finished mocking a few lines earlier, and if not, then appoint themselves amateur scientists who can now explain various space-time phenomena.

I am indeed a layperson, doing a fairly good job of explaining to another layperson, considering that none of us are astrophycisists (that I know of... and if you are, get your ass in here, and help me out).

Level any and all specific criticisms toward my explanation, please. I can withstand criticism. I can even withstand being wrong. But you are not helping anyone to suggest that we're all talking nonsense because we don't have access to astrophysics equipment and knowledge.

Singularities are so basic in nature that you can understand them just by wanting to. Same with vibration, refraction, and probably all the other important things that define our universe. If you want to delve into the numbers, be my guest. I don't understand them, but I don't need to. I understand singularities as far as I am able and willing and any further knowledge would not really benefit me. Like I mentioned earlier, though, providing more or corrective information would be appreciated.

276
Interzone / Re: Night
« on: December 04, 2013, 02:49:24 AM »
What is going on in the top photo? Is that a stream of magma?

277
Interzone / Re: Black Holes.
« on: December 04, 2013, 02:46:26 AM »
I've never understood what singularity is.

It is a point. If you think of a singularity like a sphere, maybe a small moon or a planet, then you could not stand on one side of it.. Your feet would be touching its entire surface.

You could also think of a singularity like a pixel on your computer screen. An object moving across the display can't get from one side of the pixel to the other. It is either there or not there.

As you shrink a sphere, its curvature increases. Increase the curvature to infinity, and you have a singularity.

Since mathematics doesn't allow for infinities, singularities in real life are special, because they are indescribable by math, which means a hey day for those who use math to understand universal mechanics.

Thanks. Still, it's very abstract. I'm left with the feeling I still don't know what it is. It's a point? Where would this point be, what would it do? How are they related to black holes? Would the singularity be like total dissolution or absorption?

I have the feeling that all the concepts that are thrown around for people who are not scientists are severely condensed for the general public. In reality, they are a bunch of calculations. Am I right?

I'm not a scientist, so I won't speak for them.

I am pretty sure you can grasp a singularity intuitively without any math though.

I say a singularity is a point because it does not have distance between one side and the next. If you draw a circle on paper, you can point to any spot inside it, and still be "inside" the circle. If you draw smaller and smaller circles, you will eventually have on so small that your finger cannot fit inside of it; your finger covers the entire thing up. Not having any space inside for another object to move around in; that is a singularity.

That is significant when you consider the smallest things in the universe that we measure; about 10 raised to -33 centimeters. That's really, really small. The reason we use this point for measurement is because if you get any smaller, you lose the location of whatever you are trying to measure; things just sort of "disappear" sometimes, when they are that small. But those things are particles and subparticles, and are typically of very low mass. Hell, photons are treated as practically mass-less.

Singularities that appear in nature like in black holes, then, are special, because they are still really, really small, but they are not nearly mass-less. In fact they are as massive as stars. Stars are only stable so long as the hydrogen explosions inside them can counteract the intense gravity that is squeezing it into a spherical shape. Due to entropy, the hydrogen will eventually run out of energy and the star's own gravity will overcome the outward-pushing force of hydrogen explosions. At this point, the star shrinks indefinitely. Evidently, we get a black hole after that, because with no outward-pushing energy to save it, the star shrinks to a singularity, with gravity so strong that it even bends the orbit of photons! That's really saying something considering that photons move faster than anything else in the universe and are nearly mass-less! But that also means that singularities are invisible. Since photons carry information as light, we cannot see what is going on in the vicinity of a singularity; thus the name, "black hole".

278
Metal / Re: Daily listening playlists
« on: December 02, 2013, 09:54:08 PM »
Man how can you listen to Mercyful Fate every day?

Unless its all the parts without King Diamond.

I guess I'm kind of a guitar geek, I love the riffs and leads.

I didn't realize MF put out albums without Diamond. All the albums I have feature him as the singer.

279
Interzone / Re: Black Holes.
« on: December 02, 2013, 04:09:13 PM »
I've never understood what singularity is.

It is a point. If you think of a singularity like a sphere, maybe a small moon or a planet, then you could not stand on one side of it.. Your feet would be touching its entire surface.

You could also think of a singularity like a pixel on your computer screen. An object moving across the display can't get from one side of the pixel to the other. It is either there or not there.

As you shrink a sphere, its curvature increases. Increase the curvature to infinity, and you have a singularity.

Since mathematics doesn't allow for infinities, singularities in real life are special, because they are indescribable by math, which means a hey day for those who use math to understand universal mechanics.

280
Interzone / Re: Coursera introductory classes on Classical music
« on: December 02, 2013, 01:42:18 AM »

I love learning about the guts and gears of music, but I hate to be taught.

I'm not sure if that means that you'll watch or you'll hate them because they are trying to teach you something in the lectures...

Yeah, that sounded really stupid, didn't it?

I meant that I learn "at my own pace". I need to be able to satisfy curious tangents by breaking away from whatever subject I'm on and digging around elsewhere. And I hate to be on other people's time. So I'd rather not have a person spending time with me, trying to explain things, going over lessons, answering my questions, quizzing me. It makes me feel like a load on their shoulders and I can't concentrate when thinking that way.

Learning from books is what I do best; videos are the next best thing.

281
Interzone / Re: Pig-chimp love
« on: December 02, 2013, 01:39:07 AM »
At least I can feel less weird about some of my fetishes.

282
Interzone / Re: Black Holes.
« on: December 02, 2013, 01:37:06 AM »
Astrophysicists don't "fear" black holes; I thank they are rather excited about them. Singularities don't appear to exist anywhere (else) in the universe, so to have an example of a "living, breathing" singularity that can be indirectly observed is really fascinating. Science's only use is explaining cause and effect relationships, so of course that's what the physicists are going to try to do. It is their job, after all.

Physicists deal with singularities on a smaller scale when working with mathematics, but when you are working with shapes too small to be observed, you are "allowed" to smooth things out with handy functions of numerical interaction, so they don't have to deal with points that appear at first glance to render infinities. So the idea of having to deal with infinities on a real-life up-close scale like a black hole's singularity is pretty exciting.

283
Metal / Re: Daily listening playlists
« on: December 02, 2013, 01:30:56 AM »
I can only listen to Onward to Golgotha like, twice a week, and often less than that. That level of intensity affects me too much if I expose myself to it over and over in a small time span. Same with Reign in Blood (and most of the other death metal I listen to on a regular basis; Suffocation, Death, Morbid Angel); just enough is almost too much.

To keep the music from becoming overwhelming, I space a lot of Ravelle, Debussey, Stravinsky, and Rachmoninov, and miscellaneous Segovia in between the metal. It helps me to keep the perspective that I prefer.

Now Mercyful Fate, Burzum, Inquisition, Manilla Road, and Celtic Frost have albums that I can listen to every day, but they are not so psychologically demanding as the death metal albums. Maybe if I had more time to just sit and listen and do nothing else, I could absorb more of the DM in a shorter period of time but I don't want that level of intensity to become my norm. Slow, quiet, meditative, and fluid music must come in between the DM, and that makes the experience all the more extreme when I do decide to throw on some Deicide.

284
Interzone / Re: Coursera introductory classes on Classical music
« on: November 30, 2013, 05:18:01 PM »
Thanks for this! Downloading now.

I love learning about the guts and gears of music, but I hate to be taught.

285
Interzone / Re: Who/What is God?
« on: November 30, 2013, 05:16:52 PM »
Quote
That's the point. God is within reality. Reality and God play by the same rules. There may be additional dimensions, afterlives, alternate realities, occult dimensions, etc. but they are not dualistic, e.g. of an entirely different logical rule-set than reality itself.

If only I could reason people into this idea. This is like the very last concept that people (spiritual, religious, superstitious, atheist, whatever) want to accept. I don't know what is so difficult about accepting the idea; it practically shines with righteous truth.

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