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Topics - death metal black metal

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1
CUFF: "Spastic Craniotomy" Now Streaming!

10/31/2014 - DeathMetal.org has exclusively debuted CUFF's latest offering "Spastic Craniotomy" taken by the bands 8th studio album. The new track can be streamed here: http://smarturl.it/Spastic-Craniotomy

"Spastic Craniotomy" is the first track from the upcoming album Transient Suffering Through the Ergosphere and it features special appearance by Larry Wang (Coprocephalic, Guttural Corpora Cavernosa, Gorepot).

“The music reflects a more chaotic and experimental sound than the 'Forced' album”, states vocalist Bob Shaw. “With a much better production quality and instrument arrangements than CUFF has ever offered before, Transient Suffering is surely Cuffs heaviest album yet”

Transient Suffering Through the Ergosphere is the second out of a 3 album storyline following the events of Forced Human Sacrifice to the New Gods of Earth. Once again featuring album art by Mottla Art, 'Transient Suffering...’ includes guest appearances by Larry Wang (Coprocephalic, Guttural Corpora Cavernosa, Gorepot) Chris Williams (Upon Your Corpse) Anthony Davis (Swine Overlord, Gutfucked). It also features 7 new original tracks, re-visited track ‘Breeding Diverse Entities’ (from 2009’s Universal Punishment album) plus a Cock and Ball Torture cover for ‘Supreme Genital Goddess’

The album was recorded at Black Cloud Studios in early 2014 by Ken Coul and CUFF. Mixed/Mastered/Sound design by Z. Smith

Track list is as follows:
1. Spastic Craniotomy
2. Malignant
3. Transfusion of Bodily Fluids
4. Gorging the Sacred Carrion
5. The Transcendence of Mankind
6. Sub-sonic Impacts
7. Through the Ergosphere
8. Breeding Diverse Entities (Re-recorded)
9. Supreme Genital Goddess (CBT COVER)

Transient Suffering Through the Ergosphere out November 18 via Gore House Productions.
Pre orders can still be found at http://smarturl.it/Shop-CUFF

Links
https://www.facebook.com/CUFFLYFE
http://cuffmerch1.bigcartel.com
http://cuffmusic.bandcamp.com/

http://gorehouseproductions.us9.list-manage.com/track/click?u=f45eaa9032861a54237c7e518&id=b93c5c13dd&e=b042390dce

2
Metal / Cult Mongers Zine
« on: October 07, 2014, 11:06:17 PM »
Old school-ish zine, also supporting a distro and Metal Music Coin.

http://cultmongerszine.com/
http://metalmusiccoin.pw/

3
Metal / Advice for bands
« on: October 07, 2014, 02:13:03 PM »
Promoting your music in the metal scene is difficult because there is so much metal and, while the musical competence and production values have improved since the 1990s, content is generally bad and the result is that listeners tend to treat it all as about the same.

Getting a review

If you want your album reviewed, make an electronic press kit. This should include:

  • * An MP3 copy of your album, with correct track names including band name, album name and song name in both filename and ID tags.
  • * A large image of the front cover, preferably 1200x1200 pixels or larger, and a current band photo of the same size.
  • * In PDF, .docx, RTF or TXT form, a band biography including all contact information including social media and website presence for the band

When you contact us for review, do not ask if you can send the link; just send the link. Like other music sites, we have a "review stack" on which we dump the MP3s and then listen as we can. Remove as many barriers to this process as possible.

Most reviewers like to throw on the whole album, not selected tracks. This way, we hear all of what you have to offer. Most reviewers will listen to the first track until they find something that seems obvious, overdone, typical, random, etc. and then begin skipping tracks. They will listen to these subsequent tracks to see if anything grabs them in the first minute or less. For this reason, your first track should be something relatively compelling.

Things that turn reviewers off include obvious clones of existing acts that do not demonstrate their own content; if your band imitates a known style but has its own content, no one will mind. If your band imitates another band including content, you face a harder path. For example, a band that writes music in the style of Autopsy but clearly has its own ideas for song structure, riff form, melody, harmony and rhythm (including vocal hooks) will get more attention than a band whose only claim to fame is that they sound like Autopsy. Most people will prefer to just listen to the original. Reviewers also dislike lazy songwriting that falls back on known tropes, randomness which shows a lack of attention to quality, stupidity, textbook-derived technicality that serves no other purpose, and other artifacts which reveal a lack of purpose thus a lack of something clear to communicate. Be clear about why you are writing music and what you hope to convey, thus the experience and consequently emotion you hope to provide to the listener for their enjoyment.

Writing a press release

Unlike many sources, my attitude is that form is less important than clearly and concisely stating what your band is about and why you are offering up your music. The press releases that get glossed over are the ones that detail your successes as a commercial entity; that information is important for labels but not for reviewers. Better to tell us what connects an audience to your music and what inspires you and where you hope to be.

Include full contact information. Also include your band's presence on social media, the web, etc.

I suggest including a band statement as part of this, like a sample interview question. What's different about this new album or, if it is your first album, what does it shout to the world?

Proofreading never hurts but many of us are agnostic to spelling and grammar if the content is good. What will drive us away is a press release that looks like little thought went into it that also has no content other than "we're a local band looking for a label because we sound like a lot of other bands that made it big."

I also suggest having a YouTube link to a video with a sample song. You do not need to "make a video"; just put some cover art or a band picture on there and let the song stream. This way people can read for twenty seconds and listen for thirty seconds to tell if they think you have anything going on.

4
Interzone / -- Archived Forum --
« on: July 01, 2014, 05:25:04 PM »
As of July 01, 2014, this forum is now archived.

Interzone has been replaced by the forum at this location.

For more information:



5
Quote
Much of the rancour has surrounded frontman James Hetfield’s proclivity for hunting, with campaigners concerned that such activities run counter to the Peace and Love spirit of the festival.

At time of press 25,379 people had lent their signature to a petition calling for the band to be banned on the grounds that he has a “vile obsession with hunting”.

Whatever one’s views on the morality of hunting the campaign does lack credibility. Are we to ban artists from Glastonbury for any sort of objectionable behaviour and simply have Coldplay perform every year? There was certainly no outcry whatsoever when a host of headliners with nefarious pasts and in some case unabashed criminality were booked to perform.

http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/yorkshire-living/arts/music/the-anti-metallica-rhetoric-smacks-of-hypocrisy-enter-metal-1-6697091

Even in highly adulterated form (nu-Metallica) heavy metal is too feral, mythological and atavistic for modern "safety first" kiddies.

6
Metal / Heavy metal is a culture separate from black, gay culture
« on: June 28, 2014, 09:17:10 PM »
Quote
Speaking about the diversity of audiences at heavy metal shows, Ward — who is also a member of rap-metal pioneers STUCK MOJO — said: "Metal always gets weird… and I don't even know… but it gets this weird reputation of being racist or homophobic. It's, like, why? And they say, well, there's a not lot of black people at the shows. It's, like, black people are welcome. We don't have a sign [saying that no blacks are allowed to attend metal concerts]. But it's about culture. And that's the one thing that people don't realize… Because there's not a lot of gay heavy metal bands, that doesn't mean that that culture is not welcome, it's just that we gravitate towards things that we are culturally drawn to, and black culture, in general, is drawn to music that came up in black culture… you know, rap music, R&B, blues, jazz, and there are places where those cultures can meet, and they often do. But even LIVING COLOUR and bands like FISHBONE, they don't have large black audiences. They play rock music, so they have a mainly white audience. So it has nothing to do with color, it has to do with culture."

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/fozzys-rich-ward-explains-why-there-arent-a-lot-of-black-people-at-heavy-metal-shows/

The most important part:

But it's about culture...we gravitate towards things that we are culturally drawn to

8
Metal / The band Opeth was ripping off
« on: June 07, 2014, 07:35:08 PM »
http://www.deathmetal.org/forum/index.php/topic,18441.msg90305.html#new

In the 90s it became clear that soft/hard was a winning formula. Bands like Nirvana later capitalized on how to write a gentle acoustic verse and then have a wailing chorus. But before that, metal bands experimented with this, possibly starting with Venom's "Cold Northern Breeze" but maybe dating back to some of the Black Sabbath experiments.

Cemetary took this into death metal, mixing a ghostly fast vibrato (I still don't know how they did this technique) with lighter distortion than most, creating a sound like veils draped over the howl of wind through a cave. Then, they added in acoustic guitar used strategically at points of quiet emotion, then built up to the more raging death metal riffs. Far subtler than the soft-verse/hard-chorus that Nirvana, nu-metal, etc. would use, this technique caught the attention of many for its subtlety and emotion.

Then Opeth cloned it in a simplistic form, following the nu-metal option.

9
Metal / Canadian shooter quotes Megadeth
« on: June 06, 2014, 01:45:06 PM »
In what appears to be his final post, the page's author used the words of a song by the metal group Megadeth.

You say you've got the answers, well who asked you anyway?
Ever think maybe it was meant to be this way?
Don't try to fool us, we know the worst is yet to come.
I believe my kingdom will come.


http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/06/world/canada-shooting/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

10
Metal / How Slayer re-invented the postmodern world
« on: June 06, 2014, 01:39:34 PM »
HOW SLAYER RE-INVENTED THE POSTMODERN WORLD

Jeff Hanneman left this world for demon realms on May 2, 2013 but the band he created along with Kerry King, Tom Araya and Dave Lombardo lives on. In fact, in the spirit of Francis Fukuyama's The End of History and the Last Man, which posited that modern consumer society was the last stage of human history, the International Day of Slayer presents an understanding of how Slayer re-invented the postmodern world.

In 1983, people thought life was pretty much back to normal. Those 1960s, and the hedonistic 1970s, those were probably just hiccups. Science has conquered all the great fears. We have explored every ocean, climbed every mountain, even seen into space. Billions of pages of documents and books have been written. Surely we know everything. This is humanity at its peak; things can only go up from here. Right? But it seemed as if we were covering something up.

Like a demonic eye, Slayer saw past it all. A managed society created by hordes of MBAs. The positive propaganda on the television. Our assurance that we had fought moral wars and put ourselves on top through an almost religious devotion to freedom. Everything that could fixed, had been fixed, by the use of power from outside. Now in a society of love and trust we were finally together and would beat those nasty Russians and spread our Utopian vision. But the eye of Slayer stared into our soul.

Our souls exuded the faintest whiff of... decay. Fear. Moral cowardice. Emptiness. Slayer caught the trail and peered deep within. Underneath our glossy brochures, good intentions, and technology, the darkest demons of humanity roused themselves. The victims are asleep, thus now is the time to strike. Our oblivion -- out of sight, out of mind -- allowed us to hide the dark abyss within. When you peered in deeply enough into the hollows, you saw the lack of purpose and fundamental deception that we tried desperately to hide.

Fukuyama was wrong. Consumer society is not the last age of humanity. Rather, it is the last age of the old era. The darkness has won, and creeps forth to urge us to destroy. Instead of a world where every question is solved, we face a world of ambiguity. Despite having banished religion, it seems as if the old tales of things that go bump in the night might have truth to them. We are the evil that lurks in the night and our souls turn dark when exposed to the light. Slayer showed us our illusions and pierced them.

31 years after the first notes of Slayer burned themselves into a studio tape and immortal legend among Hessians everywhere, the dark vision of Slayer rises again like a phoenix. We live in times of great change and upheaval. While no one else was able to give us a guide, Slayer did, and continues to guide us into the next era.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyd_0lTUhCg

11
Metal / National Day of Slayer 2014
« on: June 06, 2014, 01:29:10 PM »
...who's celebrating? I'm "working from home" so that I can listen to the material at volume above miniscule.

12
Metal / Shane Bugbee interviews Behemoth's Nergal
« on: June 05, 2014, 03:51:20 PM »
For Immediate Release 6-5-14


Behemoth founder Nergal talks the meaning of Art and his hope that Christianity lives on with Underground filmmaker and author Shane Bugbee.


Recently, one of Black Metal's most outspoken performers sat with underground journalist, filmmaker, author and iconoclast Shane Bugbee for candid interviews about art, censorship and Satanism.


Nergal (Adam Darski) of Behemoth, who has been on trial for blasphemy in Poland, is an Energy Drink spokesman, and recently became a cancer survivor.  He spoke with Shane in May while touring the USA. Due to Shane's own career of controversy, spanning a quarter century, publishing obscene books, working with Church of Satan founder Anton LaVey, bringing the first black metal bands to the U.S., among other feats of transgression, Shane Bugbee was able to get the answers others never can.


The interviews can be viewed in several short videos, seen in pictures and heard via mp3 on a couple of websites Bugbee runs, Creative Class Trumps Ruling Class (http://creativeclasstrumpsrulingclass.com/), and his personal website, The Occult Stylings of Shane Bugbee (http://www.shanebugbee.com).


Video & Audio Links:

• nergal defines and defies defining art… http://creativeclasstrumpsrulingclass.com/?p=1110

• the hope that christianity never dies… nergal of extreme metal band behemoth talks the religion of doubt: http://www.shanebugbee.com/?p=2367

• Full audio interview and photos: http://www.shanebugbee.com/?p=2304


For more information on the work of Shane Bugbee, also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_Bugbeehttps://twitter.com/shanebugbeehttp://www.usaodd.com/

14
Metal / Danziggy
« on: May 30, 2014, 10:43:00 PM »

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