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Barbarism reverses ecocide

Barbarism reverses ecocide
May 10, 2011, 06:29:33 PM
Quote
The study, published online Jan. 20 in the journal The Holocene, looked at land use and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere between the years 800 and 1850. Globally at the time, humans were cutting down forests for agriculture, driving carbon into the atmosphere (vegetation stores carbon, so trees and shrubs are what scientists call "carbon sinks"). But in some regions during certain times, wars and plagues culled the population, disrupting agriculture and allowing forests to regrow.

http://www.enn.com/agriculture/article/42679

Civil utilitarian society is inherently ecocidal and if it runs amok, ultimately suicidal. We need the sort of leadership that knows how to do two things.

  • spot growth caused by people and say no more for now
  • clear away past growth that has withered but still occupies space and return it to wildland

Re: Barbarism reverses ecocide
May 10, 2011, 09:48:53 PM
  • clear away past growth that has withered but still occupies space and return it to wildland

A similar idea applies to settled areas: stop building more buildings, start renovating the abandoned/dilapidated old ones.  In my area of London, there's an entire (former) business district which is almost totally deserted, and is generally owned "by the council" (i.e. "nothing will ever be done about it, stop asking").  At the same time, this same council seriously considered knocking down abandoned houses to build - guess what - office space for local businesses.  This is fucking insane, and the surrounding residents combated the motion immediately.  So now they're knocking down the old houses to build houses.

My fucking God.

Re: Barbarism reverses ecocide
May 10, 2011, 10:29:09 PM
[I'm from] London
Everything makes much more sense now.

stop building more buildings, start renovating the abandoned/dilapidated old ones.
Humanity has fucked itself so hard that even this seemingly totally intuitive position is complicated. See, for the past 150-200 years, your status is more or less determined by your wealth. Naturally, this will make you want to be fiscally responsible, even if it makes you environmentally irresponsible. Many buildings, especially those built post World War II, are constructed out of things that are poisonous if grinded into dust and inhaled because they are cheaper and quicker to make than building a proper structure. I understand that this may be less of a problem in an old city like London. If you're living in Australia or America north of the Mexico-US border, you will have to take away almost every structure carefully with as little destruction as possible to do what is truly best for the environment.

Jeez leweez

Re: Barbarism reverses ecocide
May 10, 2011, 10:31:49 PM
Then don't take the structures away, just give them a paintjob and some new wiring/plumbing - hey presto, a usable building at infinitesimal cost compared to a brand new complex.

Re: Barbarism reverses ecocide
May 10, 2011, 11:08:53 PM
Then don't take the structures away, just give them a paintjob and some new wiring/plumbing - hey presto, a usable building at infinitesimal cost compared to a brand new complex.
Those buildings will still crumble eventually, releasing the toxic compounds.

Re: Barbarism reverses ecocide
May 10, 2011, 11:29:49 PM
Then don't take the structures away, just give them a paintjob and some new wiring/plumbing - hey presto, a usable building at infinitesimal cost compared to a brand new complex.
Those buildings will still crumble eventually, releasing the toxic compounds.

All the more incentive not to build any more of the things, but, rather, make the most of the ones we have, while possibly slowly starting to dismantle the totally unusable ones.

Better yet, put a big sarcophagus over them and lock undesirables inside with explosives; blow them the fuck up.

Re: Barbarism reverses ecocide
May 11, 2011, 01:31:27 AM
- buy up unused land, manipulate governments to conserve forest area better
- encourage fitting more people into smaller spaces, through vertical building and smaller housing
- concentrate the area of "attractive" zones (cities) by making most areas less comfortable to live in
- manipulate the economic market so that environmental destruction goes against businesses' favour