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Slowing down the mind

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 19, 2011, 09:04:52 PM
The human body lusts for life. We isolate ourselves from life and wonder why we're so restless. You don't need drugs, prayer, or meditation. Go out and fuck someone.

Alternatively, try meditation.
Alternatively, smoke crack and worship Satan!

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 19, 2011, 09:20:39 PM
Is the goal to reduce mental stimuli or the need for excessive amounts of it?

The thing about TV, video games, porn, the internet, etc. is that they provide an easy means to immediate yet fleeting rewards. Thus, working on tasks that require more patience and focus before coming fruition (such as developing a skill or meditating) might be helpful in decreasing your dependence on such activities.

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 20, 2011, 03:18:57 AM
I would advice against sitting still in a forest for an hour, that sounds boring as fuck.

And this is part of why our culture will never be able to stop itself from committing ecocide without a radical change in mindset. If you can't create an awareness and come into a relationship with the community of life, then you will never be able to truly respect it. You can't come into a relationship with the biosphere by merely studying it scientifically; like a person you can only truly know it through interaction and direct experience.

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 20, 2011, 04:26:35 AM
It's already been scientifically established that finding oneself in a green space causes biochemical changes in a human - knowing this, why aren't more scientists tree huggers?

Phoenix

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 20, 2011, 11:05:50 AM
I would advice against sitting still in a forest for an hour, that sounds boring as fuck.

And this is part of why our culture will never be able to stop itself from committing ecocide without a radical change in mindset. If you can't create an awareness and come into a relationship with the community of life, then you will never be able to truly respect it. You can't come into a relationship with the biosphere by merely studying it scientifically; like a person you can only truly know it through interaction and direct experience.

I see what you're saying. I would submit, however, that on the left-hand path discipline doesn't have to entail suffering. It need only entail intellectual challenge, which can be quite fun, and which involves suffering only insofar as one fails to realize the right answer.

Is the goal to reduce mental stimuli or the need for excessive amounts of it?

I would identify two aspects.

First, you want to qualitatively improve the nature of your thinking, which I might describe as learning to think more 'softly', 'subtly' or 'with stillness'. Consider that you are sitting in a chair, there is a floor or ground underneath you, you're wearing clothes at the computer (HOPEFULLY!?), your body possesses hands, a head, a torso, etc. You are aware of all these things at the present time as you read this, yet you are not constantly reminding yourself of it. You do not need to "say" it to yourself by thinking it out in words, rather you know it without words, in concepts. I would submit that, in this vein, one should strive to make their thinking less conventional, dense.

Second, you want to work towards reducing the amount of your thoughts so that you only usually think important thoughts, that you often think nothing at all, and that sometimes you can think sillier thoughts but you do it in a controlled way whereby you can stop whenever you want [this is an idealized scenario, in reality you may need to often humour yourself to cope with the insanity of surrounding society, but you would not get carried away in your humor, humor is truly an art to be mastered!]. In this approach you realize your intentions, desires and emotions are intimately bound to your thoughts, as truly your important thoughts are extensions of these things. You realize that if your priorities in life are silly priorities, then your thoughts will be equally silly, because the subject matter you choose to engage in life (and think about) is silly. It's a matter of building inner unity by rooting out incongruous, contradictory or outright mutually-exclusive feelings, intentions, desires, and beliefs.

Ultimately, the more one progresses at it, bringing stillness to the mind cannot be separated from an overall spiritual evolution.

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 20, 2011, 12:47:58 PM
I would advice against sitting still in a forest for an hour, that sounds boring as fuck.

And this is part of why our culture will never be able to stop itself from committing ecocide without a radical change in mindset. If you can't create an awareness and come into a relationship with the community of life, then you will never be able to truly respect it. You can't come into a relationship with the biosphere by merely studying it scientifically; like a person you can only truly know it through interaction and direct experience.

I see what you're saying. I would submit, however, that on the left-hand path discipline doesn't have to entail suffering. It need only entail intellectual challenge, which can be quite fun, and which involves suffering only insofar as one fails to realize the right answer.

Let me put it this way then: Sitting in the forest for an hour and not moving is not boring, and it is definitely not suffering. If someone thinks it would be "boring as fuck" they have probably never done it and have no idea what a forest is actually like. If you think it is suffering then I don't know what to tell you. Trees and animals and insects and water and fungi and decomposers don't recognize the left or right hand path. They were the teachers of humanity long before Yahweh and his most loyal angel, and they are outside their dichotomies.

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 20, 2011, 12:52:10 PM
I've done it for about 20 min. and then i got bored. Maybe if I had some hotwheels cars with me!

But really, I'd much rather walk through a forest. I experienced what I think was ego death while doing this on LSD. Is that gay or what.

I'll admit I'm no nature boy, I've only ever been camping once. But its something I would like to do.

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 21, 2011, 11:02:35 AM
I too grew up a video game kid. Over half my life thus far has been spent honing my videogame and internet skills. But keep in mind racing thoughts is a symptom of bipolar disorder. Our childhoods exacerbated this but in my case it's genetics, yours could be too. Find a good psychiatrist (easier said than done) and see what he has to say.

Since I started taking an atypical antipsychotic with a mood stabilizer my thought patterns have improved dramatically. Before I started my meds, I was tormented by racing thoughts that were  literally impossible to stop. My mind was in a perpetual state of disarray and it was impossible to focus. I was paranoid and I thought the government controlled people via radiowaves during the worst of my mania. Cardiovascular exercise and weed offered some relief but only short term. At one point I abused amphetamines for the couple hours of clarity they offered, but obviously that just made things worse. I know some members of this forum are staunchly opposed to psychiatry as a whole, but medication has significantly improved my quality of life and I would be  dysfunctional without them. Meds may or may not be for you, but just remember that psychiatrists have doctorates, the members of this forum do not.

Outside of medication, I concur that prayerful meditation is a great way to cultivate concentration and maintain a realistic frame of mind. I would advice against sitting still in a forest for an hour, that sounds boring as fuck. Taking walks promotes clear thinking, same with running and biking.  Excessive introversion is worthless, so try opening up and sharing your thoughts with loved ones.



I feel excatly like you described. I hate to get personal, but my father had some symptons back in his youth that made people want to give him a strong drug, that made things better. But only for one day I think, then he quit the drug (I think it was used as an emergency, not for life. The drug  was fenobarbital). He still has obssessive compulsive disorder to this day.  I already went to a psychiatrist some time ago, he prescribed two drugs, one that I don't remember if it was an anti-depressant, and an anti-psychotic. But I never bought them. I don't want to be in need of drugs for the rest of my life, and I think that the symptons would come back the same if I quit the medication. Plus I don't want to live with the side effects.

Re: Slowing down the mind
September 21, 2011, 11:51:04 AM
 I know meds seem like a ball and chain, but I get much more out of life with them than without them.  They might be able to help you just the same.  Either way, I wish you best of luck in your mental training.

Also, know that the sedative your father took is nothing like modern antipsychotics.