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Article on design

Article on design
September 20, 2011, 10:14:05 AM
http://www.firstthings.com/article/2009/03/001-science-and-design-10

Quote
For an irreducibly complex system, function is attained only when all components of the system are in place simultaneously. It follows that natural selection, if it is going to produce an irreducibly complex system, has to produce it all at once or not at all. This would not be a problem if the systems in question were simple. But they're not. The irreducibly complex biochemical systems Behe considers are protein machines consisting of numerous distinct proteins, each indispensable for function; together they are beyond what natural selection can muster in a single generation.

One such irreducibly complex biochemical system that Behe considers is the bacterial flagellum. The flagellum is a whip-like rotary motor that enables a bacterium to navigate through its environment. The flagellum includes an acid-powered rotary engine, a stator, O-rings, bushings, and a drive shaft. The intricate machinery of this molecular motor requires approximately fifty proteins. Yet the absence of any one of these proteins results in the complete loss of motor function.

Some adaptations are far to specific to have been the result of random mutation. The flagellum illustrates this; it didn't just poof into existence with all fifty proteins in place as a result of a random mistake during gene replication, nor did it evolve gradually from such a process. It's almost as if its form was pre-coded, probably in "junk" DNA.

Re: Article on design
September 21, 2011, 04:39:24 AM
In certain areas in the Deep Sea, sea creatures can contain certain phosphorescent bacteria, which can shine or pulse as required by the fish, thus allowing them to see in a place of no sunlight.  A species of tortoise (turtle?) contains, in effect, a "natural" compass in its head, which it uses to navigate the world.  I'm sure there are other "biological" irregularities which certainly seem more "designed" than "evolved" (and I'm not saying which they are, I'm merely commenting).

Re: Article on design
September 21, 2011, 05:29:53 AM
What about complex behaviour in social groups- little societies,  like birds migrations or honeybees?

It can't be easily explained by evolution theories either.

Re: Article on design
September 21, 2011, 06:39:47 AM
Hardline Evolutionist theories as to the origin of life: "it just sort of happened one day".

Re: Article on design
September 21, 2011, 07:42:48 AM
It's not explanatory power which evolutionary theories lack, in fact it is their ability to explain everything in terms of purely material causality that make them so enticing for modern humans.  Of course if one digs down deep enough one can find flaws, but these are easily dismissed by the proponents of the theory.  Ultimately this is not an argument which resolved by reason alone, because the premises of evolution are not irrational per se, it is only by a proper understanding of the metaphysical structure of Reality that one can discern the errors inherent in evolutionism.  Of course, one cannot argue this point with someone who believes that by reality we mean a vast collection of matter which exists in a metaphysical vacuum for no reason and operates according to laws which are completely arbitrary.

Re: Article on design
September 21, 2011, 09:45:25 AM
It's not explanatory power which evolutionary theories lack, in fact it is their ability to explain everything in terms of purely material causality that make them so enticing for modern humans.  
...

Of course, one cannot argue this point with someone who believes that by reality we mean a vast collection of matter which exists in a metaphysical vacuum for no reason and operates according to laws which are completely arbitrary.

Theological respek knuckles? No thanks. Chance is just a property of our models to explain reality, it is not that reality is a crazy absurd place where everything is completely arbitrary.

Re: Article on design
September 21, 2011, 10:09:06 AM
It's not explanatory power which evolutionary theories lack, in fact it is their ability to explain everything in terms of purely material causality that make them so enticing for modern humans.  
...

Of course, one cannot argue this point with someone who believes that by reality we mean a vast collection of matter which exists in a metaphysical vacuum for no reason and operates according to laws which are completely arbitrary.

Theological respek knuckles? No thanks. Chance is just a property of our models to explain reality, it is not that reality is a crazy absurd place where everything is completely arbitrary.

My point was that if two parties have a fundamental metaphysical/epistemological disagreement, then the discussion of a peripheral application of their premises is fairly pointless.  Obviously we have such a disagreement, and this thread is not the place to attempt to resolve it.