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The doomish death vein, before doomdeath

The doomish death vein, before doomdeath
May 12, 2007, 09:52:23 AM
I refuse to speak of the really boring stuff that came out in the name of doom metal, and later doom death. Repeated E chords and moaning make me want to suicide, and I won't grant them that satisfaction.

However, it's interesting to think about how much of early death metal encompassed doom as a mode in its palette, and so escaped the repetitive nature of doom metal with its full effect intact.

1. Celtic Frost - probably started the whole mess, as a black/death hybrid with Gothic and doom aspirations.
2. Obituary - "Cause of Death" was remarkably doomy because it knew when to slow down and then pick up later. This saved it from being either doom, or adynamic death metal like much of the FL output at the time.
3. Gorguts - the first two albums made each song a descent, starting off in pure death metal, and then dropping to a melodic slower pace before picking up to a conclusion. Repetitive but effective.
4. Asphyx - the masters of doomy death metal from Europe, they made budget riffs cool by working them into epic songs.
5. Incantation - "Onward to Golgotha" may be the best death metal album ever made, in part because its rhythm section knew when to use different tempos to segregate ideas within the song, allowing the moods to freely express before melding into a conclusion.
6. Infester - occult doom-death with nationalistic leanings, this band resembles Gorguts if given the impetus of Incantation and the esoteric drama of Wagner.

I'm sure I've missed others, but I think these were the primary acts that influenced what was to come. I am not sure if doom-death is all that important, but I know that without dynamic, song structure on a scale of the whole piece, and some form of melodic development, death metal becomes techno played in power chords with no direction and I won't debase myself by spending time listening to that.

At the Gates, Carnage, Demigod, God Macabre and Fleshcrawl all deserve consideration here as well.

In fact, most of the better death metal bands made considerable use of 'doomy' passages.  

Wolfbane

Your forgetting the most important band in this equation: Autopsy!

I would go so far as to suggest the Karelian Isthmus by Amorphis. But at the gates? The red in the sky is ours was a fairly energetic work, not what i would consider doomish.

Blessed are the Sick anyone?

Nile577

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5. Incantation - "Onward to Golgotha" may be the best death metal album ever made, in part because its rhythm section knew when to use different tempos to segregate ideas within the song, allowing the moods to freely express before melding into a conclusion.


Has anyone worked out what the spoken word section right at the end of the track 'Deliverance of Horrific Prophecies' says? It sounds like something backwards, although it could possibly be Latin.

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But at the gates? The red in the sky is ours was a fairly energetic work, not what i would consider doomish.


Perhaps he was referring to "Gardens of Grief"?

There are plenty of doom parts on that release, but as you said, it's really the only album of theirs that has many doom moments.

Having mentioned Celtic Frost, Hellhammer's "Triumph of Death" has always been what springs to mind for me when someone mentionsd doom, or doomy metal. The slower droning style rather than the fasty punky based riffs on a lot of Hellhammer/Celtic Frost are good examples of early doom/death or whatever we're calling it.

Asphyx, especially The Rack.

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Has anyone worked out what the spoken word section right at the end of the track 'Deliverance of Horrific Prophecies' says? It sounds like something backwards, although it could possibly be Latin.

I heard somewhere that he's saying "I sang Golgotha in the nude"; no idea if that's true or not.

I was listening to Ceremonium's second disc last night, first time in years with a decent set-up. Vastly underrated Death/Doom band, the second disc is leaning more towards the Black Metal side of things as well. I am pleasently suprised by the 'unpredictable' nature of this album. The music itself, has a strange mystical feel to it as well - unlike other US band's that attempt to practice this art.

Is their first album OOP? Cant really find much info about it.

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I heard somewhere that he's saying "I sang Golgotha in the nude"; no idea if that's true or not.


I will never hear that album in the same way again.

Don't forget CIANIDE either, who took a significant CELTIC FROST/HELLHAMMER influence and made it theirs in the context of American death and speed metal.  "A Descent into Hell" is probably their crowning achievement.  They recently released a 2CD demo/promo compilation as well, which is great for the older material.

Annihilaytorr

The first Death/Doom hybrid(well, besides Hellhammer/Celtic Frost)was Dream Death. What makes them really unique is the fact their sole full length was released in 1987 and puts the Death Metal side of their sound firmly within the Possessed school of old style Death Metal.

Dream Death - Journey into Mystery(1987)


STS

The first cluster that comes to mind is the Greek quadra Varathron, Rotting Christ, Necromantia and Septic Flesh- their importance to the development of atmospheric, stylistically classical death metal is incalculable.