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Archaic video games

Archaic video games
October 14, 2008, 02:02:01 PM
From ACT list:

Red Alert:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=RCH2G8YI

Red Alert 2 - part 1/2:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=0RU3IGQM

Red Alert 2 - part 2/2:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=53PDB5I4

Free Descent II demo:
http://www.descent2.com/shareware/d2

Free Descent I demo:
http://www.descent2.com/shareware/d1

Descent:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=043SNIKA

Carmageddon 2:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=UVK4SGT3

Command and Conquer: Tiberian Sun:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=7L3UVV51

These are older games, apparently better than a lot of the stuff now, except in graphics.

Re: Archaic video games
October 14, 2008, 06:57:32 PM
I normally approve of your opinion on music, but your choices here are bad. These are mindless games, yes they're better than the new stuff - but was that ever any reason to listen to Death?

Try these instead

Strategy:
http://www.matthewmurray.net/Reviews/ComputerGames/Civilization.html
http://www.cdosabandonware.com/std_games_details.php?gameid=659#

Adventure:
http://www.adventuregamers.com/article/id,501
http://www.gameboomers.com/reviews/Ll/The%20Last%20Express.htm

Interactive fiction:
http://www.abandonia.com/en/games/388/A+Mind+Forever+Voyaging.html
http://www.the-underdogs.info/game.php?id=4633


Re: Archaic video games
October 15, 2008, 05:42:48 AM
You should rather pick Carmageddon 1. Very nihilistic. Digitalized sprites were better than those blocky 3D peoples in second part (I hated that trend back then). There were three instrumentals from Fear Factory - plastic, brutal and primitive as it should be in such production.
Other games I liked a lot when I was younger was Doom and Doom 2. I remember that music was direct ripoff from Pantera (many from Vulgar Display of Power, most notably Mouth For War, This Love, Rise), Slayer (Behind the Crooked Cross) Alice in Chains (Angry Chair, Them Bones), Black Sabbath (After All the Dead), some Metallica. Game was great. Athmosphere, occultism and science fiction, design, textures, demons and aliens modified cybernetically, and a bit of d&d was somthing, that kids must dig back then. I discovered other references when I was older: Cacodaemon, logo that may have something in common with crust punk Doom as well as with their music on their instrumental called Confusion. Id certainly followed metal path and were somehow influenced by same things that created Death Metal (at least its mainstream brand). Their next game was unsuprisingly influenced by Cthulhu Mythos.
I'm surprised that games you presented aren't really "old". They were popular at time when I was engaged most with that form of entertainment but it was a long way for me before that moment. Wasted time...

I found this if someone cares...
http://doom.wikia.com/wiki/Doom_music
http://doom.wikia.com/wiki/Doom_II_music
Atheist ?!

Re: Archaic video games
October 15, 2008, 07:30:21 AM
Doom brings back some memories (IDDQD), especially those of slaying zombies while listening to Deicide's first two.  It seems Trey Azagthoth is a fan http://morbidangel.com/Zdoom/chamberofdis.html (I believe he also composed the music; unfortunately composed durning the Heretic years).

Re: Archaic video games
October 15, 2008, 03:16:37 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frontier:_Elite_II
I enjoyed it when I was younger.

Re: Archaic video games
October 15, 2008, 05:37:42 PM
Wasn't the last thread on videogames locked because the admin deemed them an incredible waste of time?

Anyway, Planescape Torment is the only game I feel comfortable endorsing here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planescape:_Torment

Quote
The game begins with the protagonist, known only as The Nameless One, waking up with total amnesia. He soon finds out that he is immortal; if he is killed, he will simply reawaken in the same body. He sets out on a quest to regain his lost memories, and discover why he is immortal. As the game progresses, he slowly remembers events from his many previous lives. He discovers much about the personalities of his previous incarnations, and the great influence they have had in the worlds and people that surround him

The key philosophical theme of the work is presented as a question several times: "what can change the nature of a man?". This question considers the possibility (or impossibility) of changing fate; many characters in torment are fighting against their natures, or against what seems to be an inevitable fate. One example is Nordom, who, despite being a modron (a hive-minded species) is developing a personality of his own.

Selfishness is also a very present theme. The Nameless One has, in previous incarnations, been so committed to understanding his condition that he has been willing to sacrifice everything and everyone on that quest. Many consequences of this can be discovered through the game..

Re: Archaic video games
October 15, 2008, 07:49:56 PM
Doom was great (IDFKA :D)

im also partial to most games released by Blizzard (Starcraft, Diablo 2 LOD, etc)

i was a big fan of Total Annihilation. the musical score in that game was phenomenal. full orchestra playing themes of peace when you are building your base, and stirring pieces when your units engaged in total war. probably my favorite video game soundtrack ever.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6mZZiI4ShQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7vsg6n-3hc&feature=related

Re: Archaic video games
October 16, 2008, 05:49:22 AM
I hope we recall that Varg was a D&D player in his youth.

I'm a bit younger, so I grew up with home consoles, in particular, the SNES and the RPGs by Squaresoft made before 1995. The family computer wasn't meant to play games. What was most interesting about games such as Final Fantasy IV, Secret of Mana and Chrono Trigger, to name a few, is that they were more like interactive stories than anything, and the Final Fantasy series is notorious for being very operatic. A lot of the stories are tied together by recurring motifs in the music.

So as a young kid, I grew up with interactive cartoon epics in a time of instantly-gratifying, button-mash gaming. I even picked up on a lot of new vocabulary just from the character dialogues. The stories weren't a matter of arbitrary absolute good-versus-evil, and left them at that, rather there were always several forces at play. I recall Weev wrote something about the story of Secret of Mana being parallel to the Hindu creation/destruction myth, but I can't seem to find his writing on the matter.

I never liked FPS, platformers, fighters, and other games of that nature because they never stick with you after you have played. In fact, it seems that with those types of games you are less satisfied with them when you've stopped playing, and you won't be happy unless you're playing it again. They were just mindless entertainment, like everything else.

(Doom was interesting, just a bit, because of its ties with metal and the games' creators.)

While a lot of idle time during the youth years can be spent with video games, they can lead to wasted time, and should really be avoided in adulthood.

Games that challenge your cognition, like strategy and puzzle games, are probably the only safe territory here.

Re: Archaic video games
October 16, 2008, 06:29:30 AM
I normally approve of your opinion on music, but your choices here are bad. These are mindless games, yes they're better than the new stuff - but was that ever any reason to listen to Death?

They're about comparable to what you posted, with the exception of Carmageddon, which is mindless -- and awesome.

I don't endorse video games; these are games from the past that were interesting. I've never been a gamer, and never could be. Moving virtual bits on a virtual screen... at least get a blog. You might influence 50 people a month.

But your suggestions look interesting, and I will pursue them. I am trying to find information about the ancestor of Civilization called "Taipan," a game for the 6502 machines. Any knowledge? It was virtually identical and a little brainier, save the graphics.

Re: Archaic video games
October 16, 2008, 09:10:32 AM
I never liked FPS, platformers, fighters, and other games of that nature because they never stick with you after you have played. In fact, it seems that with those types of games you are less satisfied with them when you've stopped playing, and you won't be happy unless you're playing it again. They were just mindless entertainment, like everything else.

(Doom was interesting, just a bit, because of its ties with metal and the games' creators.)

i dont know, good fighters like MVC 2, and good shooters such as Wolfenstein, Counter Strike, some of the Medal Of Honor and Call of Duty games, and Goldeneye i found to be quite fulfilling. i can go back to those games any time, and theyll never get old for me.

Re: Archaic video games
October 16, 2008, 11:11:02 AM
I find a good pen and paper game like Dungeons and Dragons tends to involve the imagination more (no flashy images that tell you what everything is supposed to look like, and a much larger amount of freedom than the game's programming confines you to), and also, you can't really play it alone, so there's some social interaction involved as well.  Granted though, they're ultimately both just games, and while it's harmless to spend some time on them, they should never be elevated above the fact that they are just games.

Re: Archaic video games
October 17, 2008, 12:44:35 AM
One of my favorite games is still Tetris. If I ever have kids, I'll make sure to have this game on hand, as it is a great way to build one's spatial abilities.

Some of those early FPS games can be a good source of mindless fun, but I remember my hours of playing Starcraft and Warcraft 3 much more fondly. Both of these game employ a heavy dose of meta-skill in that they require balancing a whole bunch of different operations under a single systemized strategy. Much more engaging than Red Alert.

At the end of the day, there is a whole world of different leisurely pursuits that are more productive and fulfilling than video games. Video games are a pretty damn good example of modern society's tendency to waste a shitload of technology screwing around, when it could be put it towards much more productive ends.

Re: Archaic video games
October 18, 2008, 07:04:56 AM
But your suggestions look interesting, and I will pursue them. I am trying to find information about the ancestor of Civilization called "Taipan," a game for the 6502 machines. Any knowledge? It was virtually identical and a little brainier, save the graphics.

It's one of my first search results out of the net. It's the windows conversion. I didn't test it fully but it seems operable by my first glance.

dll

Re: Archaic video games
October 18, 2008, 10:56:53 AM
One of my favorite games is still Tetris. If I ever have kids, I'll make sure to have this game on hand, as it is a great way to build one's spatial abilities.

At the end of the day, there is a whole world of different leisurely pursuits that are more productive and fulfilling than video games. Video games are a pretty damn good example of modern society's tendency to waste a shitload of technology screwing around, when it could be put it towards much more productive ends.
You got to both points I was going to make before I did. Tetris forces you to use logic and then only makes you use it faster as the levels progress. I also couldn't agree more with your last statement.

Re: Archaic video games
October 18, 2008, 07:36:48 PM
At the end of the day, there is a whole world of different leisurely pursuits that are more productive and fulfilling than video games. Video games are a pretty damn good example of modern society's tendency to waste a shitload of technology screwing around, when it could be put it towards much more productive ends.

They could put it to more productive ends by making BETTER GAMES, just like in music. I find the parallels of the rise and fall of computer games to metal very interesting - starting in the 60s/70s with very rudimentary stuff, quality thoughtful games started in the mid 80s and peaked in the late 80s/early-mid 90s, then declined slowly towards the end of the century with mostly crap being churned out in the last 10 years.

They both declined for the same reason - an obsessive focus on the form (flashy technicals) over the content (plot and function/melody and structure). People now buy games and music for instant gratification, only to be disposed as soon as the latest graphics design or faster guitar shredder comes out.