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Archaic video games

Re: Archaic video games
February 18, 2009, 07:06:10 PM
Re: Valve, i have to admit i liked Portal quite a bit. i found the idea of people forming emotional attachment to the box fucking hilarious, however

Re: Archaic video games
February 18, 2009, 08:26:33 PM
Re: Valve, i have to admit i liked Portal quite a bit. i found the idea of people forming emotional attachment to the box fucking hilarious, however

Youre not the only one.

Want some cake?

Re: Archaic video games
February 19, 2009, 12:57:12 AM
Before the thread disappears.

Shadow of the Colossus.

Re: Archaic video games
February 19, 2009, 01:48:30 AM
more like an ability to follow narrowly-set patterns of unchanging rules and laws in order to move, in a linear fashion, towards a predetermined result.

The game of life is different how, exactly? Good luck escaping the laws of nature, however they may manifest themselves (physical laws, systems).

Re: Archaic video games
February 19, 2009, 08:59:27 AM
it is different in the degree of its complexity, much as reading Heart of Darkness is different from reading a Clifford book. tied in to that, it's also unpredictable - although laws are constant, they are not all known, or even understood. you're not choosing to submit yourself to a set of behavioral parameters when you go for a walk and amazingly don't drift off into the upper stratosphere; the parameters are in operation regardless of your acceptance of them. if you want to display true will power in a GAME, cheat. use all the methods at your disposal. winning by following the rules only displays a desire to be praised, not a desire to win.

Re: Archaic video games
February 25, 2009, 02:16:33 PM
At the end of the day, video games are like television: spending quality time locked in yourself when you could be creating something instead. Why not just chomp on AIDS-infected dicks?

Re: Archaic video games
February 25, 2009, 02:47:19 PM
that's a failed criticism - reading is no different. every medium has certain capabilities that others don't. as with all other media, 99% of this one is composed of shit. that doesn't mean the other 1% is as well.

Re: Archaic video games
February 25, 2009, 02:52:59 PM
At the end of the day, video games are like television: spending quality time locked in yourself when you could be creating something instead. Why not just chomp on AIDS-infected dicks?

Right, and I suppose you're going to lecture me on how listening to Death Metal is so much different...

Re: Archaic video games
February 25, 2009, 05:25:52 PM
At the end of the day, video games are like television: spending quality time locked in yourself when you could be creating something instead. Why not just chomp on AIDS-infected dicks?

I take extreme issue with what you say because I fail at life. I will lose sleep tonight knowing you posted this.

Re: Archaic video games
February 25, 2009, 05:40:41 PM
that's a failed criticism - reading is no different. every medium has certain capabilities that others don't. as with all other media, 99% of this one is composed of shit. that doesn't mean the other 1% is as well.

Respectfully, I disagree.

Like genres, different media have different strengths and weakness. That doesn't mean they're equal, or that those capabilities are important.

For example, if I constructed a machine that played by sense impressions of having sex with various famous women. That's a different medium. Is it equal?

Video games go nowhere. TV goes nowhere. Both of them put images in your head where you should be using your imagination. You're letting someone else directly program your brain. Books and music require interpretation, require you to meet life half-way and bond with it.

I think it's fine to disagree, but I note that addicts are defensive.

I've been reading over the descriptions of video games here and quite honestly, I think it's masturbation to praise them highly.

Can a true masterpiece emerge from, say, rap or techno or jazz? No -- because they're not dedicated to order but to aesthetics. They do not require you to meet them half-way and pay intense attention.

Some genres are just useless. If I invented a genre where we used six notes of every key, specialized in a beat imitating the drone of an excited heart, which had a fixed song structure, would we say it compares to classical?

No, it does not.

So why bother with the lesser, unless you have a lesser opinion of yourself?

Re: Archaic video games
February 25, 2009, 06:22:50 PM
all your points are solid, but i'm not disagreeing that videogames are trash. they are, but you're still throwing the baby out with the bathwater - The Doors weren't stylistically much different than the rest of the hippie-driven drug-fueled music around them, but their application of ideas has given them a different legacy than the other rock bands of the time. the reference to imagery is also failed because all visual arts put images in your head, often without much room for alternative interpretations; there's not many ways to "interpret" michelangelo's sculpture of David. this doesn't detract from their ability to affect the viewer in a meaningful way.

i can't defend videogames any more than i can defend recreational marijuana use; i don't desire to defend either, they both exist to the same end. but, i have full confidence in defending the depth of the one game i mentioned. i can't recall the last time i played it, but its story and characters remain as vivid in my head as those of Moby Dick. i'd like to suggest playing(i.e. reading) through Planescape:Torment if you haven't already. not to prove that games can be good, but simply because it IS good. the fact that it's a game is irrelevant to the quality it possesses.

Re: Archaic video games
March 24, 2009, 08:59:50 PM
No idea if anyone here has played Metal Gear Solid 2, but it seems to promote some of the ideals of this site.

Re: Archaic video games
March 24, 2009, 09:53:06 PM
How so? I played it a while back so my memory is foggy at best.

Re: Archaic video games
March 25, 2009, 01:05:49 PM
Every time a video game debate pops up, I am always fascinated by some of the responses. Most of the defenders are lost in the wonders of their childhood, the instant gratification, the awe-inspiring story elements, the brilliant atmosphere. Whatever it was: it has stuck with us. As a child I played SNES and then moved on to Final Fantasy VI and VII which was like nothing I had ever seen. The music, plot and atmosphere put me in a place I'll never forget. Life was great. In all of my memories it would seem the sun was shining through my blinds as I sat there entirely immersed in the world I'd spend time in. This is escapism at it's finest.

The attackers of the medium are looking straight at the reality and implications and consequences of the medium- they do not share the experience that bids the defenders defend it.

Now I can see the validity in both sides of the arguments. Yes, it is passive entertainment and our time on this world is better spent elsewhere. But yes, it was a great wase of time.


I can never see the great distinction between films and video games. I agree that MOST video games are useless shit. Just like most films (these days at least). However, let us think why we watch a film in the first place. A film strives to envoke emotion and thought in it's viewers. Some video games (most notabely the RPG genre) do the same, and strive for the same. And a novel? The same. When I read Robert E. Howard's conan tales I am connecting with my inner-adventure, lost in a fantastic world. When I played those RPGs as a child, I was doing the same. There are tons of parallels.

I would never say all video games are mindless. Most of them are. Most TV is also mindless, but can you say time is not well spent when knowledge is acquired as you sit watching a National Geographic special? Sure, it's condensed and streamlined, and the visuals are a priority, but the information and biological interest is there.

Now I would say that Gamer "culture" these days is just gross. It's sickening, and enveloping our frail, dumb youth.

Let us seperate the garbage like "Twilight" from a Melville masterpeice. Because as you all know if you've walked into a Border books store, the garbage fills most of the shelves. I see the same parallel with film and video games.

Re: Archaic video games
March 25, 2009, 01:51:33 PM
Every time a video game debate pops up, I am always fascinated by some of the responses. Most of the defenders are lost in the wonders of their childhood, the instant gratification, the awe-inspiring story elements, the brilliant atmosphere. Whatever it was: it has stuck with us. As a child I played SNES and then moved on to Final Fantasy VI and VII which was like nothing I had ever seen. The music, plot and atmosphere put me in a place I'll never forget. Life was great. In all of my memories it would seem the sun was shining through my blinds as I sat there entirely immersed in the world I'd spend time in. This is escapism at it's finest.

The attackers of the medium are looking straight at the reality and implications and consequences of the medium- they do not share the experience that bids the defenders defend it.

Now I can see the validity in both sides of the arguments. Yes, it is passive entertainment and our time on this world is better spent elsewhere. But yes, it was a great wase of time.


I can never see the great distinction between films and video games. I agree that MOST video games are useless shit. Just like most films (these days at least). However, let us think why we watch a film in the first place. A film strives to envoke emotion and thought in it's viewers. Some video games (most notabely the RPG genre) do the same, and strive for the same. And a novel? The same. When I read Robert E. Howard's conan tales I am connecting with my inner-adventure, lost in a fantastic world. When I played those RPGs as a child, I was doing the same. There are tons of parallels.

I would never say all video games are mindless. Most of them are. Most TV is also mindless, but can you say time is not well spent when knowledge is acquired as you sit watching a National Geographic special? Sure, it's condensed and streamlined, and the visuals are a priority, but the information and biological interest is there.

Now I would say that Gamer "culture" these days is just gross. It's sickening, and enveloping our frail, dumb youth.

Let us seperate the garbage like "Twilight" from a Melville masterpeice. Because as you all know if you've walked into a Border books store, the garbage fills most of the shelves. I see the same parallel with film and video games.

Here I make my point about how literature and music are the most superior of art forms:

There is a difference between literature/music and movies/video games/television.  Literature and music provide you with one sense each: in literature's case, visual sensation from reading, and this is not complete as you are reading words without images, and in music's case auditory sensation obviously.  In only hearing music, or in only hearing words, your mind has to supply everything else on it's own.  These mediums exercise the brain, by the brain having to substitute it's own interpretations of the received audio or visual data.  Your brain does it's own interpretations, which I find infinitely more fascinating.  I rather enjoy my imagination.

Movies/ video games/television provide you with what is largely a virtual reality.  They do not stimulate the imagination as much because much of the information is presented already there for you.  I imagine on some level this confuses the hell out of your brain and body, and in many cases, they must consider the stimuli presented to themselves quite real on a subconcious level.  Think about it: while your concious mind says that it's not real, your survival mechanisms are probably looking at the interaction of sound and sight and considering it quite real.  Of course, that is just psychological conjecture, and my main point is that when the senses are overstimulated as they are in movies/television/video games, too much of this can make the brain "lazy" in a way, as it does not require the brain to substitute it's own interpretations.