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Metalheads who went on to greater things

Re: Metalheads who went on to greater things
March 31, 2010, 11:14:30 AM
Becoming an engineer or a professor of statistics and economics in brazil seem like pretty valid successes to me. Authority positions like that have power within a society.
They aren't going to change the world, statisically speaking that's pretty much impossible for most of us. They can change their world however.
No one is saying they're not successful. All Traucos is saying is that going from the dude who did vocals on None So Vile to an ESL teacher isn't necessarily going on to greater things, for as a vocalist he arguably had a wider impact on the world. The thread should really be called "metalheads who went on to be successful in other fields," in which case it is a perfectly apt description. But I do think you have a point in saying that mistaken belief in an ability to change the world can lead to depression; one should learn not to aim higher than one's abilities let them.

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Power over self = overman.
No.

BTW, I heard Trey Azagthoth is playing NES in his mom's basement. Saving the world, ONE PRINCESS AT A TIME.

And Hitler wasn't particularly successful. He probably had a mental disease and shot himself to avoid getting sodomized by the Soviet army. Good job, bro. Like a true Aryan.

Re: Metalheads who went on to greater things
March 31, 2010, 01:37:53 PM
It turns out that the skeletal remains the Soviets claimed were 'Hitler's' belong to an unidentified woman.  General rule of thumb when dealing with Soviet-era claims: don't trust, but verify.

Re: Metalheads who went on to greater things
March 31, 2010, 11:59:34 PM
Used hitler as an example of one persons actions cultivating international renown, many metalheads do fantastic things that you'd have no way of knowing about. Suggest thread be renamed to "hessians who did interesting things outside of music that garnered the attention of a wider community", but all things considered the current thread title is doing a wonderful job.   I don't recommend heetler as a blazing role model for the hessian youth in their fight against banks and absented foreskins, however he really sold me on the meth addict/genocidal lulz angle and should be recognized accordingly (a shower of syringes and uncleaved foreskins on his head).

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Power over self = overman

No

I'm curious why you'd vilify this, also thread derailment

Re: Metalheads who went on to greater things
April 27, 2010, 04:59:26 PM
Maybe it's a bit of a stretch but isn't Bruce Dickinson a fencer and commercial airline pilot? He's also a Western History buff.

Power over self = overman.

That's certainly where it must begin, then power and overcoming branch out from there. We can then define those whose power begins and consequently depends on that which is without as definite undermen. Example: notable strictly in terms of lucky wealth like inheritance or lottery winner or popularity like a TV star or rock star.

Re: Metalheads who went on to greater things
April 28, 2010, 07:52:20 PM
There are many people who are metalheads who have gone on to become productive members of society.  I myself know some people who are biologists, chemists, teachers, psychologists, and even forensic scientists/crime scene investigators who are metalheads.  There are even metalheads who are well-versed in theology and become scholars in religion.  While that may require distancing from the more Satanic currents in metal, it does not have to completely remove one from metal.

Re: Metalheads who went on to greater things
April 28, 2010, 10:48:28 PM
There are many people who are metalheads who have gone on to become productive members of society.  I myself know some people who are biologists, chemists, teachers, psychologists, and even forensic scientists/crime scene investigators who are metalheads.  There are even metalheads who are well-versed in theology and become scholars in religion.  While that may require distancing from the more Satanic currents in metal, it does not have to completely remove one from metal.

Interesting twist friend. I have a minor in philosophy and religion, and worked in that field during the summer of 2007 on an assignment for my job. I find no problem with the study, discourse and debate of world religions (including Christianity). Religion is an expression of mankind's microcosmic self and a foundation for most early cultures. For each religion it's crystal clear that a dominant personality was able to manifest their self-actualized nature and influence enough people for that person(s) to be venerated throughout the ages and into modern times (albeit in smaller cells).

I'm pretty sure that the Satanism of early Norwegian Black Metal was the foil of this, only devoid of dogma and legitimate "belief." I can't bring myself to understand them as "devil-woshippers," but more as vice-regents of resurgent atavism. All of those crimes were most likely symbolic of a culture under years of stress from an alien folk-spirit that inched towards forced universalism.

Their actions, regardless of their criminal status were genuine and should have been expected.

Re: Metalheads who went on to greater things
April 29, 2010, 03:30:38 PM
I wouldn't be surprised if there were many more out there who have gone on to do important things (or at least OTHER things), but whom we are unaware of because they don't advertise their metalness. Even in a relatively casual workplace, blasting Slayer while you draft project proposals is a little weird. The really successful ones are probably working someplace where they have short hair and suits and ties. I imagine the more influential they are, the harder they are to spot.

As an example of a FAN though, how about Russian President Dmitri Medvedev? I hear he used to make bootlegs back when bands like Black Sabbath were blacklisted in the USSR.

Glenn Danzig comes to mind, with the formation and perpetuation of his namesake band.  Beats the shit out of high school punk.

The really successful ones are probably working someplace where they have short hair and suits and ties.

I have known a number of these. They don't look metal, act metal or talk about it publically, but at home they've got a ton of it and like to listen to it.

It's really difficult to listen to metal in a professional work environment, and also, it's kind of counterproductive. Your attention is divided. That might work OK with really simplistic stuff like war metal or speed metal, but for anything with real spirit and complexity it dumbs it down.

If you're working on a quiet task, however, classical music builds the mood. Its less insistent sonic dynamics allow it to exist in parallel with your thoughts and augment them with a sense of order, logic, structure and joy.