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Office work

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Office work
January 09, 2010, 06:27:31 AM
Gawping at a PC for 40+hrs a week is not healthy. Office workers are needed to sustain most of the pointless exercises in our current economic landscape. Would other forum users share the opinion that in order to create a strong, healthy society with meaningful, rewarding occupations the majority of it needs to be occupied with physical labour?

(- - of course you would have maybe a "head" council of the community's most intelligent to direct proceedings as it were- - -)

Re: Office work
January 09, 2010, 07:01:28 AM
Gawping at a PC for 40+hrs a week is not healthy. Office workers are needed to sustain most of the pointless exercises in our current economic landscape. Would other forum users share the opinion that in order to create a strong, healthy society with meaningful, rewarding occupations the majority of it needs to be occupied with physical labour?

(- - of course you would have maybe a "head" council of the community's most intelligent to direct proceedings as it were- - -)
I used to work in an office for 40 hours a week. I never did overtime because I was efficient in getting what I needed to do done in my set hours.

I worked there from graduation for 3 years.

Then I moved interstate to live with my girlfriend. They treated me well so I didnt want to just pack up and leave. So I offered a suggestion that I could work for them 2000km away using remote access. Almost a year later everything is going well, I pop in for a chat when I go back home to visit my parents and friends I grew up with.

Office jobs don't mean stagnation. If you're smart and proactive you can get what you want out of them providing you find a good company. I'm in accounting and I work from home and set my own hours, if I get the job done I get lots of freetime and skip all the rigmarole of meetings and other such office friendly obligations!

I don't know if I did too much physical labour I might hurt my back, I know plenty of others who have! There's disadvantages and advantages in most jobs that you'll ever encounter. the key is to make them work for you.

Re: Office work
January 09, 2010, 09:40:28 AM
I'm currently working for the federal government, and I am doing over 40 hours a week. Since it is a government job, it is not very stressful at all, and it is (presumably) a healthy work environment in my eyes. My career offers many work environments. I have the choice of doing field work on contaminated sites (impacts on my health to a certain degree), compiling technical reports and data (computer work), and/or have meetings and oral presentations with higher-ups or the for public. I'm currently compiling technical reports for distribution to consultants and academia.

I attended a course yesterday regarding environmental regulations where many consultants attended. It was very interesting experience to see how industry, government, and scientists work with(out) eachother. The general idea I got from it was that scientists are impractical, the government regulations are not effective, and industry tries to cover up the issues of the environment. It's a very flawed system, which perhaps someone one day can improve!

Re: Office work
January 09, 2010, 10:30:03 AM
Would other forum users share the opinion that in order to create a strong, healthy society with meaningful, rewarding occupations the majority of it needs to be occupied with physical labour?

Or just walking two miles to work, a half-mile or so to lunch, and then around the city center in the evening?

Re: Office work
January 13, 2010, 01:16:02 PM
To break the tedium of computer/ work, I mounted a thermometer outside my office window.  Yesterday evening it dropped to -55F (that's below 0F) and today it's -15F with a 40mph wind.  As much fun as Pure Holocaust is, being frozen by icewinds does not constitute a healthy work environment.  I gladly return to Access databases and GIS mapping...  This is only tolerable though because I spend almost all my time from May - September flying, hiking, floating, and 4-wheeling around remote army training areas collecting field data (to be processed over the winter).


Re: Office work
January 15, 2010, 08:20:40 PM
In the summer since I am part Sicilian, I work outside and tan naturally. I love the labor I do outside as it strengthens me.

Re: Office work
May 09, 2010, 09:44:22 AM
http://www.healthzone.ca/health/article/764517--being-bored-can-kill-you-study-finds

Just completed my work term. I can safely say that I cannot do desk work for a prolonged period of time, unless it involves thought and I enjoy it. I'll plan on doing fieldwork in the near future instead. I cannot recommend working at a government institution.

Re: Office work
May 09, 2010, 11:01:32 AM
Would other forum users share the opinion that in order to create a strong, healthy society with meaningful, rewarding occupations the majority of it needs to be occupied with physical labour?

You need a physical outlet or else you will become an invalid whether you realize it or not. Your brain can be working all week but if your body is not accessing it's physical capabilities your health (physical and mental) will undoubtedly be effected. Deepak Chopra once said that the human being is the only entity to be able to change their physical health with their mind; I believe that works both ways. You can change your mental health with physical health as well.

You don't have to go overboard with physical labor. Time management is crucial in the scope of being balanced. Overindulgence can satiate you to it and dull the experience of being physically healthy. It's a nice thing to have it incorporated into your profession, but it can be grueling, especially in the winter months. Have you ever seen "the proletariat stare?" My father became an asshole because of this, and it's unfortunate because there was a lot of mathematics included in his job that he could have focused harder upon and maybe pursued a less hands-on career.

There's money in physical labor; money and hard work make the world go round :)


Re: Office work
May 09, 2010, 05:18:00 PM
After school I will be programming but I'm putting myself through physical labour to get there.  I will be the office worker that respects and appreciates physical labour

Re: Office work
May 10, 2010, 12:14:13 AM
You need a physical outlet or else you will become an invalid whether you realize it or not. Your brain can be working all week but if your body is not accessing it's physical capabilities your health (physical and mental) will undoubtedly be effected. Deepak Chopra once said that the human being is the only entity to be able to change their physical health with their mind; I believe that works both ways. You can change your mental health with physical health as well.

Which is quite depressing for those of us who are chronically injured, or disabled. Luckily there's Stephen Hawking so I think the theory that you will become an invalid is wrong. You will just need to adapt.

Re: Office work
May 10, 2010, 09:41:28 AM
You need a physical outlet or else you will become an invalid whether you realize it or not. Your brain can be working all week but if your body is not accessing it's physical capabilities your health (physical and mental) will undoubtedly be effected. Deepak Chopra once said that the human being is the only entity to be able to change their physical health with their mind; I believe that works both ways. You can change your mental health with physical health as well.

Which is quite depressing for those of us who are chronically injured, or disabled. Luckily there's Stephen Hawking so I think the theory that you will become an invalid is wrong. You will just need to adapt.

Now now there... I'm sure that the sensible people of the world adsorb things in relativity. I would never think of the chronically injured or disabled as invalids. Reread my message and you will see that I've made reference to your body accessing physical capabilities. If those matters such a physical work and exercise are somehow BEYOND your capabilities, than that's a different paradigm to be considered. Furthermore it's one that I'm not at liberty to speak about in confidence since I have no idea what that is like.

Re: Office work
May 10, 2010, 06:52:36 PM
Gawping at a PC for 40+hrs a week is not healthy.

Most jobs are pointlessly boring because they're dumbed down so that everyone can work together with the inevitable idiots and peasants.

An office job is what you make of it. The office is the tool; is the goal good? Are there smart people around? Is the task interesting?

If not, do something else. There's more than one path to Valhalla.

Re: Office work
May 12, 2010, 10:02:32 AM
Found this today:

Quote
I never really understood how anyone could submerse themselves in a career (except maybe for research scientists and musicians) in our modern, hyper-ventilated dog-eat-dog industrial rat-race. To me, modern jobs have always been like that Robert Hoyt song where he sings about it being "Quittin' Time" on the high-tech plantation - it's all (or at least most of it) drudgery and tail-chasing that separates us even further from not only the natural world but our own humanity. Okay, maybe I'm a little jaded here as I never really fell in love with a job (except parts of my Coast Guard radioman work and broadcast experience). So, who knows, maybe if I'd become a cancer researcher or evolutionary biologist I'd have kinder things to say about earning a paycheck but as it stands now I think most of us could tell the boss you-know-what...

http://www.rogerwendell.com/about.html