Burzum’s Filosofem turns 20 today

burzum-filosofem

This is the sort of recording that could very easily displace the already accomplished works of Kvist from your memory. Filosofem, while released 20 years ago this day, was recorded in March 1993; meanwhile, the first track (“Dunkelheit” or “Burzum” depending upon the pressing) was the first track ever written for Burzum. As part of the initial burst of Burzum’s material, Filosofem sticks to a language of black metal that Varg Vikernes helped define, but is arguably closer in spirit to the pure ambient works that followed it. The internet overflows with discussion of the circumstances surrounding this album, as well as its excursions into a sort of streamlined “Odinpop”, but like its illustrious predecessors, Filosofem‘s influence is immense, even if most who try to imitate the ideas on display here kind of miss the point.

8 Comments

Tags: , , , ,

Krallice suddenly releases Hyperion EP

krallice_hyperion

Given that I felt Ygg Hurr was one of the big turds of 2015 (well, perhaps not so much one big turd as a disorganized, half-liquid pile of scat), you can imagine I’ll probably feel similarly about Hyperion. This 26 minute EP came out today without so much as a marketing campaign, although the Bandcamp page from which it’s available claims the tracks were recorded in July 2013. I took the time to briefly sample it, and while the overall messy approach of the band seems about the same, this seems to showcase a Krallice that is slightly more consonant in its randomness than what I’ve come to expect from the band. Still, most likely an EP that bears little resemblance to even the mainline “post black metal” bands, and even less resemblance to good music.

1 Comment

Tags: , , , , ,

20th anniversary of For kunsten maa vi evig vike by Kvist

kvist_debut

Kvist’s For kunsten maa vi evig vike came out on the first day of 1996; a year in which booming consumer technology and gimmicky multimedia projects overshadowed one of the many deaths of the black metal scene. Absurd soliloquies aside, Kvist’s full length debut seems to penetrate someone’s mind every now and then, and is generally praised for its melodic prowess. Our old archives don’t hold it in as high a regard, but those who favor the more conventionally musical aspects of Norwegian black metal may find some value in this recording.

8 Comments

Tags: , , , ,

Classic reviews:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z