King Crimson releases teaser of new album

by Cory Van der Pol
July 2, 2014 –

king_crimson-band_photo

1960s progressive rock band King Crimson whose evolution paralleled that of Black Sabbath in developing melody-based, complex song structure music using moveable chords and other techniques, have returned with a new recording that at just over a minute shows the direction they will take on their new tour, which will cover the US starting September 9.

The recording shows the new seven-member incarnation of King Crimson which includes Robert Fripp (guitar), Tony Levin (bass) and drummers Bill Rieflin and Gavin Harrison. Observers will note the venerable Crimson fusing its 1990s style of complex atmospheric improvisational music with its more acerbic 1970s work.

Tags: , , , , ,

3 comments

  • Imposition

    Thanks for Crimson update. This is news to me, and good news.

    However I’d say their evolution was much closer to bands like Yes, ELP, Gentle Giant, Van der graaf generator than Sabbath.

    And I don’t know what you mean by ‘melody-based’ songs which use ‘moveable chords’.

    1. fenrir

      It is not that hard to understand if you try to understand what they mean XD

      melody-based, meaning that the song will follow the evolution of a melody or melodies, I guess.

      Moveable chords often applies to guitar, just using same finger shapes for different chords. It has little meaning on the piano, I guess. On the guitar, different finger positions of the same chords with give different quality to the sound of the chord. So using “moveable chords” just means you will outline chords by moving the same finger position up and down the neck of the guitar.

      So What the writer means by the two together, I think, is that you will actually play a melody with one finger, and use the rest of the hand to outline a particular chord SHAPE. Then, apply the same chord shape to wherever the melody on that string takes you. Is this clear enough?

  • fenrir

    This is frequently used in Jazz. Because, fuck the key. Jazz is melody oriented, that why they keep jumping between keys. This is where King Crimson takes this from.