Deathsiege – Throne of Heresy (2022)

A solid candidate for album of the year, Throne of Heresy goes back the roots of war metal in Blasphemy and early Angelcorpse, keeping shorter grindcore-styled riffs in play in order to minimize song footprint and ensure hard-hitting and distinct songs populate this album.

War metal after all might be seen simply as the continuation of hardcore punk through the grindcore roots of bands like Zyklon B, Blasphemy, Niden Div 187, and Impaled Nazarene who wrote short high-intensity songs that aimed less for atmosphere than a swarming mood of intolerance and eugenic extermination of the weak, starting with the power bottom on the cross, the half-Jewish Jesus Christ.

Coming from Israel, Deathsiege aim to correct the colossal historical error of moralistic religion (which is not limited to Abrahamic religions) with a punch in the face of literalism, natural selection, and the necessity of conflict to avoid stagnation.

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4 thoughts on “Deathsiege – Throne of Heresy (2022)”

  1. somebody says:

    based

    1. All illusions burn
      Equality evaporates
      Christ is fisted (twice)
      The Buddha vomits semen
      The goat rapes Mohammed (twice)
      Inversion is inverted
      Reality returns
      The capable enslave and murder the useless
      Natural selection returns
      We head toward the stars
      Leaving behind a sparkling pink field of glitter corpses.

  2. Flying Kites says:

    I’m sure to be one finding Ledney influences where none exist, yet it is good on these Israelis to condense their great demo material into a stanza upon the album. The search for the “perfect” word requires some participant receiving such, the higher coming down to the lower and vice versa.

    1. I think they are trying to rein in war metal from being repetitive, expansive sprawl and to get closer to its roots in Sarcófago, Impaled Nazarene, Mythos, Zyklon-B, Niden Div 187, and Blasphemy. If they add a little of the atmosphere of Ildjarn, early Bathory, and Beherit, they might end up with something quite powerful. Dumbing metal down into a fungible product like late-stage hardcore punk did would be a mistake, but that is exactly what kvlt and war mvtal have tried to do in the main.

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