Wolves Among Sheep: History and Ideology of National Socialist Black Metal book published

wolves_among_sheep_-_book

Italian publisher Tsunami Edzioni has released Wolves Among Sheep: History and Ideology of National Socialist Black Metal, a book by Davide Maspero and Max Ribaric detailing the rise of this tributary of the black metal movement that officialized many of the right-wing and traditionalist leanings of black metal as a whole.

The publishers offer the following FAQ about the book and how to obtain it:

We’ve been silent for some time, but that’s because we have been busy sending orders and replying to e-mails. The response to the book has been great so far, and we thank everyone who purchased a copy.

We compiled a brief FAQ for all those who need some information regarding the book and how to obtain it. We hope you’ll find it helpful.

IS THE BOOK IN ENGLISH?
Yes, it is. The whole of it.

IS THE SPECIAL EDITION STILL AVAILABLE?
Yes, we still have some copies left.

HOW MUCH DOES THE BOOK COST?
It depends on where you’re located.

Standard Edition:
Europe and Mediterranean Basin – 38 Euro
Americas, Asia, Africa – 43 Euro
Oceania – 50 Euro

Special Edition:
Europe and Mediterranean Basin – 46 Euro
Americas, Asia, Africa – 52 Euro
Oceania – 60 Euro

HOW CAN I ORDER?
By making a Paypal payment to: info[at]tsunamiedizioni.it

HOW CAN I GET IN TOUCH WITH YOU?
Via Facebook messages on this page or via e-mail to: wolves_info[at]tsunamiedizioni.it

I NEED TO BUY MULTIPLE COPIES, CAN YOU GIVE ME A
SHIPPING QUOTE?
Yes. Just mention it in your message and we’ll get back to you.

I RUN A DISTRO AND NEED TO KNOW YOUR WHOLESALE RATES
Just mention it in your message and we’ll get back to you.

WHEN ORDERING, PLEASE STATE CLEARLY YOUR FULL ADDRESS (NO P.O. BOXES – WE SHIP VIA EXPRESS COURIER AND THEY NEED A STREET ADDRESS) AND A TELEPHONE NUMBER.

National Socialist Black Metal (NSBM) remains controversial because global civilization has shifted leftward since the late 1940s with the fall of fascist regimes in Italy and later France, National Socialism in Germany, and Nationalist movements in Japan. However, starting in the 1990s when the 1968 generation took power in politics and media, a counter-movement has arisen which is critical of democracy, equality and diversity.

Sometimes this movement is merely anti-liberal, as with Michel Houellebecq in France, or libertarian as with the Tea Party and Neoreaction, but often it takes a more potent form. The original black metal bands from Norway, Sweden and Finland embraced the idea of nationalism, or a society being defined by its indigenous people, and rejected the morality of pity, equality and pacifism. Others took this farther and explicitly endorsed the older belief systems, not just National Socialist but the traditionalism of Julius Evola, the nationalism of pre-war Europe, and the monarchism and naturalism of völkisch conservatism.

During the early 1990s, when this material first emerged, I was unwilling to play such bands on the radio when I learned of their beliefs. Later digging found the nationalism of Bathory, the pro-Hitlerian sentiments of Morbid Angel, and the generally conservative — realism plus a belief in transcendentalism — surging through heavy metal. Then came Lords of Chaos and the interviews of Varg Vikernes, tearing the lid off any obscurity that black metal had regarding its anti-humanist views. For that reason, I report on them as they are part of the black metal movement and heavy metal, and it is better to have such things in the light than darkness.

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20 thoughts on “Wolves Among Sheep: History and Ideology of National Socialist Black Metal book published”

  1. jinko says:

    Ideaological is the worst thing that can happen to every aspect of civilization.

    1. vOddy says:

      Every individual, and thus every culture, has things that are valued – in an other word, an ideology.

      Come at me with counter arguments and examples if you have them. I love to be proven wrong, but I think that I am right.

      1. jinko says:

        fuk dat shit.. it’s all abstacshun. those things whch mark a civilixion’ greatness are the way of lief of the people. liberation. art is not philosophy. believe in yofesef

      2. The distinction he’s making is between belief systems of “this works” and “this should be.”

        1. jinko says:

          not reely relevant. esp not when it becomes as stand-in 4 every aspect of a brothas lief. I can’t even begin to imagine how wrong I am about that accoding to every1 else but me

    2. Nathan Metric says:

      Ethics = Ideology

      1. jinko says:

        da fuck… ethnics ha? let me jus tell u, cos u know I know it: your entire way of thinkng – is still just a way of thinking, and itz the last thing likely to ever go through your brain when the ever presebt reality of black gentleman wanting to blade your pale ass in some haunted saloon scene manifests itself. .

        1. jinko says:

          sorry man didn’t mean that last part anyway

        2. Nathan Metric says:

          Jinko, what the hell is that supposed to mean? Are you saying it is WRONG for me think any way of thinking is better than any other way of thinking? That’s a contradiction bro.

          1. morbideathscream says:

            Jinko is mentally challenged. I don’t think he knows what he’s saying. Just look at his spelling for shit’s sake.

            1. jinko says:

              man, u r so wrong about that, but daubt if yule real eyes

            2. vOddy says:

              He could just be dyslexic.
              Which, I admit, is a form of mental challenge. But it’s not the kind that people think of when they hear the term.

              1. jinko says:

                rite. lets see yore latest report card son. did jew get it dla -approved or wat??

  2. Ara says:

    In uncovering black metal, you found an outlook that has similarities to yours. Personifying the artist through the art presented is most times unavoidable, but I usually choose to keep that concept divorced from the art itself, although double standards often apply depending on the strength or weaknesses of the product. Typically when art comes from someone with socially unacceptable views but is a solid effort, the defense is “I separate the art from the artist” but if the product sucks many will say “what were they thinking” or comment on how the product is a result of a disjointed worldview that plagues the modern world. I often wonder how much of artistic appreciation is rooted in wanting to hear or see our own perspectives agreed with by an outside source and presented back to us in an artistic gesture. I’d like to think that criticism doesn’t exist solely on the outside of our own echo chambers and that people do want to be challenged by a new idea, however it may disagree with what we believe makes the most sense. It is strange how certain ideologies can somehow be “heard” without being told of individual stances, as seen in Christian metal and so forth. Does encountering ideologies in music that you agree with enhance the product for you? How often does it come to light that someone that you vehemently disagree with creates something that truly moves you?

    1. Nathan Metric says:

      Ara, I agree. Even an art that is ideologically unsound or incoherent can have virtues that are good independent of the validity of its intent.

      1. jinko says:

        egsaktli ,dis goy sed it beta dan i eva cood .

      2. Meek Metalhead says:

        You could say that incoherent ideologies have some good parts about them too, or at least half-truths that can be taken and applied somewhere. Perfection does not exist, but can only be strived towards.

    2. I often wonder how much of artistic appreciation is rooted in wanting to hear or see our own perspectives agreed with by an outside source and presented back to us in an artistic gesture.

      A common criticism around here is “You just like them because they echo your views.” We’re going to get backdoored into that anyway, so let me address it.

      NSBM and I have mostly different views, and starkly different reasoning. I have more in common with Napalm Death and Black Sabbath than your average NSBM band, and I don’t listen to any branded NSBM although of course I enjoy classics like Graveland, Burzum, Absurd and other acts with associated views.

      In this case, however, we are discussion a historical development to a genre and its beliefs. Since it is in metal, I cover it; since it would be journalistic fraud to obscure it, I discuss it. My own views do not enter into the equation.

      Does encountering ideologies in music that you agree with enhance the product for you?

      I doubt it, since I’m usually unaware of them at the time. I don’t read or listen to lyrics for the most part, and like to have read no interviews or background on a band when listening to them.

      How often does it come to light that someone that you vehemently disagree with creates something that truly moves you?

      I don’t know, for the same reason. I enjoy bands like Terrorizer, Carcass, Discharge and Atheist, and I doubt our views overlap much.

      I think, however, that thinking often occurs on related subjects and that this drives the music. The best black metal has an epic, inhuman and naturalistic feel. Historically, that type of musical approach overlaps with nationalism, Darwinism and anti-democratic thought — but then again, so does a reading of history or literature.

      Speaking of which, I finished reading Houellebecq’s “Submission” last night. It is a beautiful book, finely crafted. I agree with much of it, which may not so much enhance enjoyment as be the reason for its initial appeal, but the book stands on its own.

      How many people who do not agree with it are praising it?

      1. morbideathscream says:

        I’m pretty much a white nationalist as I believe in a country for and by the white people, I also realize there’s no chance of that becoming a reality except maybe in Russia. I like a quite a bit of nsbm, there’s great musical examples of it and shitty examples of it just like in any genre or subgenre of metal or punk. For example, I was disappointed when I listened to arghoslent’s incorrigible bigotry, a band I would see eye to eye with on ideological issues, I thought they were a bit too melodic Gothenburg influenced for me, much prefer grand belials key.

        On the other side of things, I do like napalm death(pre-utopia banished), terrorizer, amebix, discharge and a certain number of thrash/speed metal bands who may express some leftist views. Those would be good examples of artists that I vehemently disagree with, but whose music truly moves me. Kreator’s coma of souls is another example of this. I do enjoy the apocalyptic lyrics by discharge, however.

        1. jinko says:

          white wing supremacists huh? i should have known. well DONT be listenin to blasphemy ,sarcofaygo, suffocation, sepultura, morbid angel etc etc etc. and yo ass cant hack it then fuck of back to russia (a country which hasnt produced 1 good metal band!!( … . \m/

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