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Goatcraft – The Blasphemer

April 12, 2014 –

goatcraft-the_blasphemer

While dark ambient provides a set of moods that metal listeners can relate to, it generally aims for simpler instrumentation than metal fans are accustomed to, and falls short of the dark yet violent atmosphere of death metal. Goatcraft merges horror movie soundtracks and dark ambient into “necroclassical,” a form of music created with a digital piano as its leading voice that creates a dense texture of melodic development underneath the soaring and expanding moods of dark ambient.

Created by the mastermind behind some of the music of After Death and other post-death metal projects, Goatcraft expands on the style of its previous work All For Naught with a greater tendency toward melodic development and more distinctive songs. This in itself is a great achievement, since solo piano is somewhat limited in that a certain number of techniques must be repeated to maintain the rhythmic clarity that fans are accustomed to from drum-commanded genres. But where All For Naught attempted to hammer out a death metal-like rhythm, on The Blasphemer Goatcraft shows greater enmeshing of the eerie melodies that could underscore a horror movie and the sustained atmospheres of the darker side of electronic music such as Danzig’s Black Aria or Dead Can Dance.

What makes Goatcraft compelling is that it ventures beyond the somewhat static loops of dark ambient and the more pop/rock-oriented music of electronica. The artist has stopped trying to translate rock and metal into a piano sound, and instead is seeking his own voice. While technique is often very similar, melodies diverge greatly which gives each song its own distinctive feel. These melodies also grow and develop beyond the circularity of most radio music which repeats everything twice and then reformulates it, developing instead more like the scenes of movie of futile and suicidal battle. To keep the level of ambiguity high, Goatcraft often develops its songs to a peak and then recapitulates its themes in a new direction before fading away, stating less rather than more and gesturing toward what exists behind the curtain of time.

The Blasphemer represents a maturation of the approach of All For Naught with new songs that take greater advantage of the musical prowess of its progenitor. In this more distinctive voice, Goatcraft is able to get beyond technique and aim more toward the crafting of melodies to fit a situation, which is why this concept album based on the paintings of William Blake stands out. If Goatcraft has a new frontier, it is to continue developing technique alongside melody to make songs even more distinct, but the band has shaped “necroclassical” into a unique and distinctive style in the process of its own growth. While much of this material sounds straight out of an occult horror movie centered in misty graveyards, the more aggressive and pummeling piano attack underscores these dark themes with a more physical presence, grafting onto them a menace that most dark keyboard music cannot provide. It will be interesting to see how this band refines itself further in the future.

GOATCRAFT began as a vision of frustration. Occult music had died a crass death, imitated into candy piece fragments of its original vision. Death metal had been absorbed by the insatiable obese monster that is rock music and had lost its spirit of tempestuous power, replaced instead by lite jazz and creeling self-pitying children. Even the rising dark ambient and neoclassical scenes seemed afloat on a river of fast food grease; sweltering in their own indirection.

With this massive failure pressing on his nerves like a forgotten shell fragment from a war long lost, GOATCRAFT’s sole member Lonegoat decided in 2010 to overcome doubts and re-double the attack. What was at first a keyboard attack to rival the sonic intensity of death metal quickly became layers of neoclassical piano centering on dark concepts, and later, with the addition of soundtrack-like dark ambient lush atmosphere, an entirely new type of music, baptized by Lonegoat himself as Necroclassical.

After the underground success of GOATCRAFT’s 2013 debut All For Naught, Lonegoat is back with its best and most mature work to date: The Blasphemer, a concept album themed around the works of the famous English painter and poet William Blake.

“Written and recorded from July to November 2013 under the influence of William Blake’s paintings and theological observations, the album represents my quest to reconcile the mystical side of GOATCRAFT with its nihilistic side.” sole-member Lonegoat explains.

Goatcraft to play Housecore Horror Film Festival on October 24, 2013

September 28, 2013 –

housecore_horror_film_festivalRenowned underground neoclassical dark ambient band Goatcraft will take to the stage during the Housecore Horror Film Festival on October 24, 2013 in Austin, Texas. The one-man sonic assault features morbid horror movie soundtracks played as if they were death metal played on piano.

Goatcraft singular musician Lonegoat released his first full-length, All For Naught earlier this year to confusion and bafflement by most metal fans but critical acclaim. Since that time, Goatcraft has been making more fans as people come to understand the approach and value of this bizarre and violent but soothing music.

Performing covered head-to-toe in blood, Lonegoat improvises based on themes from the album and produces lengthy compositions that are conceptually linked in motif and rhythm. At the Housecore Horror Film Festival, the latest venture by ex-Pantera vocalist Phil Anselmo, Goatcraft will be on the morbid side of a mostly more radio-friendly lineup.

Goatcraft is gearing up for the 2014 release of The Blasphemer, a full-length album due for release on I, Voidhanger Records based on the concepts and graphic imagery of 18th century poet William Blake. See also our review of the Goatcraft demo and a Goatcraft interview.

Sponsored by Scion A/V, who are the people who make urban combat vehicles, the festival promises to be a whirlwind of mayhem with bands like Gwar and Goatwhore leading the lineup. For more information on the Goatcraft performance, visit the Goatcraft live page.

Goatcraft Interview

What’s GOATCRAFT aiming for by playing the Housecore Horror Film Festival?

Goatcraft was offered to play this festival after one of the organizers, Corey Mitchell, saw one of my shows. Horror movies and soundtracks are very metal and have been a source of inspiration for countless metal bands. I think that Goatcraft will both shock and please the festival goers, as well as showcase how dark and violent piano music breaches all realms.

Can you tell us a bit about the Housecore Horror Film Festival?

Housecore Horror Film Festival is a three day festival consisting of enough horror films to desensitize even the most moral of people. Its goal is to merge horror flicks and metal under one exposition. I hope that they turn it into an annual festival after this one proves to be successful. Austin needs more blood and guts to ward off the hipsters.

How do you feel about being sponsored by Scion?

I’m personally not sponsored by Scion, but they were recently announced by the festival to be one of the main sponsors. This is my assumption, being that I am not involved in the organization of the fest at all other than being informed about the music portion and my role in it. To each their own. I’m sure that having a big company sponsor something is important for commercial success, which they want this festival to be very large.

What’s next for GOATCRAFT?

I’m in talks with others about more shows, as well as another performance on-air at a radio station. In between shows there has been effort in finishing the next album that will be out on I, Voidhanger Records in Italy. Luciano, the label owner, has a very strong grasp on art and dark music, which we’re both on the same page about the release.

Do you think neoclassical/necroclassical is expanding?

There have been countless people that have confronted me about Goatcraft here in Texas. I think that metalheads tend to be open-minded about dark music as long as it shares the same spirit as metal. I showed Vader and Vital Remains some of my new material a couple of days ago after they played San Antonio. There was nothing negative said and they seemed to like it.

Thanks Brett for taking the time to inquire about Goatcraft. All the best.


Housecore Horror Film Festival
gc live 2

  • Gwar
  • Repulsion
  • Down
  • Goblin
  • Crowbar
  • Philip H. Anselmo & The Illegals
  • Eyehategod
  • Pig Destroyer
  • Hate Eternal
  • Goatwhore
  • Whitechapel
  • Pallbearer
  • Warbeast (ex-Rigor Mortis)
  • Skrew
  • Iron Reagan
  • Ancient Vvisdom
  • Bloody Hammers
  • Primitive Weapons
  • Star & Dagger
  • First Jason
  • Chris Vrenna
  • A Band of Orcs
  • Lord Dying
  • Hymns
  • White Widows Pact
  • Child Bite
  • Blackqueen
  • Goatcraft
  • Honky
  • The Black Moriah (ex-Absu)
  • Cavalcade
  • Death Will Tremble
  • Headcrusher
  • Dead Earth Politics

Emo’s/Antone’s/Dirty Dog
2015 E Riverside Dr. / 505 East 6th St.
Austin, TX
October 24-27, 2013

Goatcraft launches new video for “Infinite Death” from All For Naught

May 22, 2013 –

goatcraft-all_for_naughtTexas-based neofolk phenomenon Goatcraft, who use piano sounds to reproduce the hammering chromatic attack of death metal, have released a new video for the song “Infinite Death” from this year’s album All For Naught. Coming from musicians who worked with post-Nocturnus project After Death as well as other Tampa-style death metal, Goatcraft is a new approach to a familiar goal.

Using only a single digital piano, Goatcraft soundscribe Lonegoat creates impromptus from simple themes to which he adds layers of complexity, producing miniature operatic soundtracks that allude to the chromatic phrasal riffing and explosive hammering of early death metal. All For Naught, the project’s first album, resounds with a resistance to the standard “keyboard music” tropes that make otherwise independent projects into clones.

All For Naught was released this year on Forbidden Records and contains a full album worth of distinctive material including reworkings of past Goatcraft songs. So far, it has made entrance into metal, industrial, neofolk and horror movie soundtrack-loving communities, and hopes to expand that reach with this more professional video that reveals some of its inner concept.