Death Metal Underground
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Is all metal speed metal now?

March 15, 2014 –

pantera-cowboys_from_hell

Tom G. Warrior is a relentless innovator and amazing composer. As he details in his book Only Death is Real: An Illustrated History of Hellhammer he grew up in an abusive, uncertain environment within a broken home. He also grew up in “perfect” Switzerland, a place that has more rules than people. These events shaped his personality or rather, the limitations that are still imposed upon it.

What happened was that young Tom G’s ego was crushed and doubt was introduced into his mind. Doubt about the purpose of life, or even his own life. Doubt of self-worth. Fear that at any moment he might find himself without a justification for existing, and be truly discarded and alone. That’s a heavy load for a young person to carry, but the sequential success of Hellhammer and then Celtic Frost lifted Tom out of it. It also pushed aside a healing process.

When Celtic Frost evaporated, Tom launched on a series of attempts to find popularity again, but on his own terms. First, his highly inventive industrial music, and later, attempts to be contemporary. The latest two are below, and they are marked by a duality: a great underlying talent, desperately attempting to ingratiate itself with newer metal audiences. Like all things that do not take a clear direction, they are thus lost on both fronts.

This is not a hit piece on Tom G Warrior. Like many metalheads, I hold him in the highest regard. He is one of the great innovators and farseeing minds in metal. However, his tendency to try to adapt to what is current shows what is currently happening in metal: in a dearth of ideas, the genre is recombining past successes that represent the culmination of earlier genres, and is trying to recapture its lead by offering a buffet of different influences. But alas, like the music of Triptykon, these forays are lost causes.

Currently a morass of subgenre names exist. We can call it metalcore, or modern metal, or math metal, or tech-deth, or even djent, but all of it converges on a single goal: to make a form of that great 1980s speed metal — Metallica, Anthrax, Testament, Exodus, Nuclear Assault — that used choppy riffs made up of muted chords to encode complex rhythms into energetic songs. To that, the modern metal bands have added the carnival music tendency to pick entirely unrelated riffs to add variety, the grooves of later speed metal, and the vocals and chord voicings of late hardcore and its transition into emo.

What this represents is not a direction, but lack of one. By combining all known successes from late in these subgenres, modern metal is picking up where the past left off before death metal and black metal blew through and rewrote the book. The problem is that making music that is intense like those underground genres is difficult, and even more, unmarketable. It approaches the issues in life that most of us fear, like mortality and failure in the context of powerlessness and meaninglessness, and thus presents a dark and obscure sound that makes us uncertain about life itself. Like Tom G Warrior living through a shattered marriage of his parents and a society too concerned with order to notice its own boredom and misery, black metal and death metal shatter stability and replace it with alienated existential wandering.

On the other hand, late punk offered ideological certainty and heavy doses of emotion. Late speed metal, which Pantera cooked up out of heaping doses of Exhorder, Prong and Exodus, offers a groove and a sense of a party on the wild side. Inserting bits of death metal, especially its technical parts, and some of the frenetic riffing of Discordance Axis allows these bands to create a new kind of sound. But at its heart, this music is still speed metal. Where death metal played riff Jenga and put it all together in a sense that told a story, modern metal is based in variety and distraction. It exists to jar the mind, explore a thousand directions, and without coming to a conclusion ride out in the comforting emulation of the chaos of society around it.

But at its heart, these bands are speed metal. Like Triptykon who revitalize the E-string noodling and riff texture of more aggressive speed metal bands, with the bounce of Exodus and the groove of Pantera, these bands offer a smorgasbord combined into one. They mix in melodic metal, derived from what Sentenced and later Dissection made popular, to give it a popular edge. However, what they’re really doing is regressing to a mean. This has happened in metal before, when mid-1970s bands recombined Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath into rock-style metal, and in the mid-1980s when glam metal did the same thing but mixed in the gentler sounds of late 1970s guitar rock bands. When metal loses direction, it recombines and comes up with a mellower, less threatening version of itself.

All of this is well and good if we do one single but difficult thing: recognize that what we’re listening to now is a dressed-up version of what metal and punk were doing in the late 1980s. We’re walking backward in history, away from that scary underground death metal and black metal, and looking toward something less disturbing and more fun at parties. It seems no one has come out and said this, so I figured it must be said. Enjoy your weekend.

Narcotic Wasteland – “Shackles of Sobriety”

January 15, 2014 –

narcotic_wasteland

Nile guitarist Dallas Toler-Wade has unveiled his new project Narcotic Wasteland with the debut of their self-titled album today and the release of a sample song, “Shackles of Sobriety.”

Based on this song, it’s clear the album comes from the modern metal camp and not the death metal camp. It starts with an impressive melodic metal introduction, then drops into the trademark of modern metal, which is Pantera-influenced vocals leading the guitars, reversing the classic death metal formula. Thus most of what you hear is vocal rhythm with guitar keeping constant texture on the backdrop, not guitar leading and vocals filling in secondary texture as all the best death metal bands did.

This creates a “rant effect” which makes me want to scream “Are you talkin’ to me?” at the screen. Behind this during verses is an updated version of the type of lead-picked speed metal riff that might have gone on a Forbidden, Anacrusis or Coroner album back in the day. Then for the chorus, we switch to similar vocal rhythms over a more percussive death metal riff which leads in to remnants of the melodic introduction. That in turn leads to a high-speed guitar solo which borrows obliquely from jazz technique but tends to do so in a throwaway style as if the solo was more there to occupy a necessary space than to serve a musical role. Then repeat and fade away.

“Shackles of Sobriety” is part of a concept album about drug addiction. Apparently Toler-Wade and friends live in a neighborhood blighted by people getting strung out and being dysfunctional, and decided to put it to comedic use by styling it as a narcotic wasteland. All humor at the over the top but prescient reference aside, there’s legitimacy to their gripe. Most of America and Europe are strung out at least on alcohol, and the result is massive dysfunction everywhere. This has been consistent since at least 1959 when William S. Burroughs wrote his epic Naked Lunch, where everybody has some vice, and some have more than enough.

While I applaud this effort by DTW and friends, I still can’t get jazzed for either Nile or this because I am a death metal fan. Nile sounds on the surface like death metal, but it uses harmonically static riffs and keeps them in standard verse-chorus positions most of the time, which obliterates the riff-leading composition used by death metal bands. Most of their stuff more resembles speed metal, as does this modern metal offering.

Goatcraft to play Housecore Horror Film Festival on October 24, 2013

September 28, 2013 –

housecore_horror_film_festivalRenowned underground neoclassical dark ambient band Goatcraft will take to the stage during the Housecore Horror Film Festival on October 24, 2013 in Austin, Texas. The one-man sonic assault features morbid horror movie soundtracks played as if they were death metal played on piano.

Goatcraft singular musician Lonegoat released his first full-length, All For Naught earlier this year to confusion and bafflement by most metal fans but critical acclaim. Since that time, Goatcraft has been making more fans as people come to understand the approach and value of this bizarre and violent but soothing music.

Performing covered head-to-toe in blood, Lonegoat improvises based on themes from the album and produces lengthy compositions that are conceptually linked in motif and rhythm. At the Housecore Horror Film Festival, the latest venture by ex-Pantera vocalist Phil Anselmo, Goatcraft will be on the morbid side of a mostly more radio-friendly lineup.

Goatcraft is gearing up for the 2014 release of The Blasphemer, a full-length album due for release on I, Voidhanger Records based on the concepts and graphic imagery of 18th century poet William Blake. See also our review of the Goatcraft demo and a Goatcraft interview.

Sponsored by Scion A/V, who are the people who make urban combat vehicles, the festival promises to be a whirlwind of mayhem with bands like Gwar and Goatwhore leading the lineup. For more information on the Goatcraft performance, visit the Goatcraft live page.

Goatcraft Interview

What’s GOATCRAFT aiming for by playing the Housecore Horror Film Festival?

Goatcraft was offered to play this festival after one of the organizers, Corey Mitchell, saw one of my shows. Horror movies and soundtracks are very metal and have been a source of inspiration for countless metal bands. I think that Goatcraft will both shock and please the festival goers, as well as showcase how dark and violent piano music breaches all realms.

Can you tell us a bit about the Housecore Horror Film Festival?

Housecore Horror Film Festival is a three day festival consisting of enough horror films to desensitize even the most moral of people. Its goal is to merge horror flicks and metal under one exposition. I hope that they turn it into an annual festival after this one proves to be successful. Austin needs more blood and guts to ward off the hipsters.

How do you feel about being sponsored by Scion?

I’m personally not sponsored by Scion, but they were recently announced by the festival to be one of the main sponsors. This is my assumption, being that I am not involved in the organization of the fest at all other than being informed about the music portion and my role in it. To each their own. I’m sure that having a big company sponsor something is important for commercial success, which they want this festival to be very large.

What’s next for GOATCRAFT?

I’m in talks with others about more shows, as well as another performance on-air at a radio station. In between shows there has been effort in finishing the next album that will be out on I, Voidhanger Records in Italy. Luciano, the label owner, has a very strong grasp on art and dark music, which we’re both on the same page about the release.

Do you think neoclassical/necroclassical is expanding?

There have been countless people that have confronted me about Goatcraft here in Texas. I think that metalheads tend to be open-minded about dark music as long as it shares the same spirit as metal. I showed Vader and Vital Remains some of my new material a couple of days ago after they played San Antonio. There was nothing negative said and they seemed to like it.

Thanks Brett for taking the time to inquire about Goatcraft. All the best.


Housecore Horror Film Festival
gc live 2

  • Gwar
  • Repulsion
  • Down
  • Goblin
  • Crowbar
  • Philip H. Anselmo & The Illegals
  • Eyehategod
  • Pig Destroyer
  • Hate Eternal
  • Goatwhore
  • Whitechapel
  • Pallbearer
  • Warbeast (ex-Rigor Mortis)
  • Skrew
  • Iron Reagan
  • Ancient Vvisdom
  • Bloody Hammers
  • Primitive Weapons
  • Star & Dagger
  • First Jason
  • Chris Vrenna
  • A Band of Orcs
  • Lord Dying
  • Hymns
  • White Widows Pact
  • Child Bite
  • Blackqueen
  • Goatcraft
  • Honky
  • The Black Moriah (ex-Absu)
  • Cavalcade
  • Death Will Tremble
  • Headcrusher
  • Dead Earth Politics

Emo’s/Antone’s/Dirty Dog
2015 E Riverside Dr. / 505 East 6th St.
Austin, TX
October 24-27, 2013

Forgotten Heroes of modern music

December 7, 2011 –

Pantera was part of the downfall of metal.

No offense to those who enjoy the people in the band personally. I’ve met several and they’re good guys.

But turning speed metal into party rock was a fatal move.

It opened the way for the real blight, which is the indie-emo-screamo-weeabo shit we see even in black metal now.

I can’t stand the saccharine, unmasculine, revengeful crap that John Lennon put out. I’m sorry for the loss of George Harrison however.